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Full text of "Blade Magazine"

'93 FACTORY KNIVES DEBUT 



WORLD'S #1 KNIFE 



PUBLICATION 







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BLADES IN BLACK 



How To PUk Your 
~>er#ecf Carry Fold* 



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REKA! Yukon 



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'to I V) ■ VAX.- 





COVER PRICE S3. 95 U.S.A. S4.95 CAN 



70989"33919" 



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Bradford's S%mfy Wa^e 



Shepherd Hills Cutleiy, manufactured by WR. Case and 
Sons Cutlery, is proud to introduce a shocking new 
collection of knives in Bubba Gum Bone! This unique 
hot color is now available in the popular trapper and 
toothpick patterns with additional releases 
available later in J 998, The distinctive Lady Case 




'/ blade etch completes this exciting new issue. 



QM 




Btjbba Gum 

Tiny 

Toothpick 

• #2195L (610096 S5) 

• Bubba Gum Jigged 
Bone Handle 

• 3" closed 

• Lady Case 
Blade Eich 




Bubba Gum 
Trapper 

• #2198L (6254 SS) 

• Bubba Gum Jigged 



1998 Additional Releases 

Bubba Gum Muskrat 7/98 
Bubba Gum Peanut 7/98 

Bubba Gum Canoe 10/98 




TO ORDER CALL 



CALL FOR FREE CATALOG 



1-888-4CASE XX or 1-800-727-4643 

TOLL FREE • MON. - SAT. 8-8 • SUN 8-6 • We're on the Web!!! www.casexx.com 
Shepherd Hills Cuilery • P.O. Box 909 • Lebanon, MO 65536 



After 15 Years.,. 

CLIPITs Still Watch Out For Y 



w^ : 









» 


^M ^B ^H 


J 


W 









. . . driving 
home through 
the moonlit 
trees, deep in 
thought . I snap to 
attention when I see 
skid marks leading to i 
the edge of the road and 
smoke rising. My mind races 
ahead of my body - I've got to help. 
I screech to a halt and stumble down the steep 
embankment. At the twisted wreck, the smell of gasoline 
nearly overwhelms me. I find the driver unconscious and 
trapped by the seatbelt that saved him. In one reflex motion 
I pull out my CLIPIT and cut the seatbelt free. Hours later, 
as the lights of home come into view, I realize how lucky we 
were to have a CLIPIT watching out for us ... 

Now There's Just More of Them 

tl ^r\I ie\i>rrf\ For more information see your local dealer or call (800) 525-7770 or 
* J PV w Wl %% ** (303) 279-8383 - See us on the Web at www.spyderco.com 



Blade 



June IWfi 



THE WORLD'S #1 KNIFE PUBLICATION 



1 2 How To Pick Your Perfect Carry Folder 

Know your needs and your choice will be a snap. By Steve Shackteford 

20 Blades In Black 

See the latest knives in your favorite color, or lack of one. By Joe Kertzman 

28 The Majica: A Sultan's Dream Come True 

Discover a sword lhat's a marvel of mechanisms. By Steve Schwarzer 

34 Charging Headlong Into The Edge Evolution 

AH hail Don Fogg, the blade smith's bladesmith! By Mike Haskew 

38 Beware Of The Medicine Man 

Learn why sharing knife knowledge bodes well for all. By Ed Fowler 

42 Married To The Steel And Each Other 

Meet the dynamic duos of embellished knives. By Mike Haskew 

48 How To Hot Shape The Blade 

Take the latest $50 Knife Shop lesson. By Wayne Goddard 

52 sao 

These pieces may be the most coveted of the Vietnam War. By Bernard Levine 

57 Which Carbon For Which Cutter? 

Study the steels the hammer boys use. By Joe Kertzman 

62 Q&A: Why Forging Stainless Isn't Worth 
The Effort 

The BLADE® answer man fills you in. By Wayne Goddard 

64 Cuts Great, Less Filling! 

AMK's Eagle packs a punch in a lightweight package. By MSG Kim Breed 

66 Knives Of The Great Alaska Gold Rush 

Celebrate sourdough steel on the centennial of the "Stampede." 
By Bernard Levine 

99 The Bowie From Two for Texas 

Learn how it was determined and who made it. By J.R. Edmondson 

I 04 Factory Fashions In The Fast Lane 

See "98's latest production pieces. By Sieve Shackteford 






4 / BLADE 



JUNE 98 



Blade 

WORLD'S # 1 KNIFE MAGAZINE 
Vol. XXV. No. 6, June 1998 



Incorporating JJMEEICIN 



-^ BLADE 



Staff 



Magazine 



Publisher 

David Kowalski 

Associate Publisher 

Thomas P. Paar 

Editor 

Steve Shackleford 

Associate Editor 

Joe Kertzman 

Advertising Manager 

Steven A. McCowen 

Advertising Sales 

Luci Stone 
Marilyn Farrow 

Advertising Assistants 

Rebecca Eberhardy 
Nancy Trommer 

Art Director 

Gregory Krueger 

Graphic Designer 

Kim Schierl 

Field Editors 

Ed Fowler, Wayne Goddard. 

B.R. Hughes, Jerry Fisk, Bob Gaddis, 

Dave Harvey, MSG Kim Breed 

Correspon den ts 

Bernard Levine — Oregon 

D' Holder — Arizona 

Jim Batson— Alabama 

Steve Schwarzer — Florida 



e-mail address 

blade@krause.com 

website address 

www.krause.com 

Subscription Services 

(715) 445-3775 ext. 257 

HlMiF.% (ISSN 1064-385}) is published monthly by Krauve Publico 
Ions, Inc.. 7D0 E. Slate SI., Iota. Wt 5499(1. Periodical postage paid at 
Into, WI M*M5 and aoditiunai mailing offices. Subscription price is I 
year (or $19.95; 2 years (or $37.95: 3 years lor 154.95 in Ihc US ind 
possessions. Foreign subscriptions, including Canada and Mexico. 
twelve issues for $50, Copjfrighl 1998 by Krausc Publications, Inc. A]] 
rights reserved except vrhcrc expressly waived. POSTMASTER: Send 
address changes to BLADE. TOO E_ Stale Si-, lolm WI 5494S. Ediorial 
contributions should be mailed to Blade Magazine. 700 E. State Si-, 
lola, WI 549904XKII and must be accompanied by return postage. We 
assume NO responsibility for loss or damage of unsolicited material. 
Any malarial accepted is subject ro such revisions as necessary in om 
sole discretion to meet the requirements of this publication. Upon 
acceptance, payment will be made al our current rate, which covers all 
author's .. 1 1, 1 or contributor's rights, title and interest in and to the 
material mailed, including but not limited to photos, drawings, charts 
.ind designs vsIiilIi glial in.' Kairjttad M MWI 1 bt HI Ql ir.iiliili'; ,,i 
delivering a manuscript and/or material shall constitute as expressed by 
Use contributor that the material Is original, and in no way an infringe. 
mcnl upon Ihc rights o( others. The views and opinions o( authors or 
advertisers, expressed or implied herein, are not necessarily those of 
the publisher, editor, or Krause Publications and they assume no 
responsibility for views of authors or advertisers, letters and questions 
to the editor: The act of mailing or delivering a letter or question shall 
const ilurc permission to publish that letter or any portion unless 
informed otherwise in that Matt 

Printed in The United States 



krause publications 

700 E. Stale St., tola, WI 54990-0001 
Phone 71544W214 • Fan 715445-4087 



*" - " 



L I GHT - STRONG - SHARP 



Jtjfej*. 



Gigand's axel ting new folders give you: 

* New hi-tech designs by Dr. Fred Carter 

* Light, strong, bard chromed aluminum alloy frames 

* Sharp AUS-HA stainless steel blades (Re ST) 

* Frame mounted lock springs 

* Smooth working alloy bearings 

* Larger stronger pivot pins and screws 

* Complete with ballistic nylon ahaath and pivot pin wrench 

* Unmatched quality and value 




GIQAND KNIVES 



a ^%'X L *^A / ror wholesale information, 

* ^ - « *'**' call toll free 1-800-888-2188 

or contact your nearest cutlery dealer, 
visit our website: www.gigand.com 
A PREMIER COLLECTING KNIFE MANUFACTURER Quantitiei are limited! 

FAX: 8o6-2-2*H»S2Sf)0 







7HES JS WHAT THE BEST LOOKS LIKE! 

Introducing the Marco Polo" and Yakuza™. Fine knives from the 
legendary knifemakers o/Seki, Japan — EXCLUSIVELY JUNGLEE™ 

(Both knives came with a nice leather sheath with a belt/boot clip) 



"MARCO POLO*"" 

A mrvivai dagger that offers the modern 
adventurer rtyfe and protective power. 
Crafted In rugged Kraton* rubber and top- 
quattty AUS-t itatViran rtoeJ this 10' ft" knife 
offers rmiHi-temrtiori at the c™,iiilf,g edge* of 
the double tided *ty." blu4e r 

KtttKf Suggested Retail *97 M 




YAKJUZA" 

tuperit tontt> with exceptant balance* 
Created in AUS-& ftaifliell iteeJ, thit doubit- 
lidcd, razor on-d t*Tf>t-*<crrat*d II" ton to 
matchei its S'ft' blade with a bna bairtcr 
and a contoured Knrion* rubber grip, 
K0J032 Suggested Retail '99* 

WHOLESALE ONLY 

For the dealer nearest you, please call toll tree l(600)CUlXEinr 



JUNE 98 



BLADE 5 



A 



// 



UNSHEATHED 




By Steve Shackleford 



Why Don't They...? 



The state of the knife industry, both 
handmade and factory, seems to be in 
fine fettle. A veritable blade buffet of 
imaginative styles, materials and mecha- 
nisms is out there for the taking, and 
many knife consumers are taking. 

However, even in "Cutlery Camelot" 
there's bound to be some nit-picking jour- 
nalist around to find fault with the status 
quo, and it might as well be me. Following 
are a few suggestions presented in ques- 
tion form to custom makers and knife 
companies alike: 



tt 



Why don't advertisers 
list the price of the 
knife in the ad?" 



• Why don't all makers (custom makers 
more so than knife companies) of fixed 
blades include sheaths with their knives?; 
•Why don't all companies/makers offer 
reversible clips on their knives that have 
clips so that the knife is easier to use by 
both lefties and righties?; 

• Why don't advertisers list the suggested 
retail or list price of the blades in their 
ads?; 

•Moreover, if a knife isn't ready for 
shipping when it's advertised, why doesn't 
the advertiser indicate as much in the ad 
and tell approximately when it will be 



ready for shipment?; 

• Why don't all knife companies tell 
exactly what steel it is they use in their 
blades instead of giving the steel esoteric 
names that only they understand?; 
•Why don't more companies offer their 
popular models in small, medium and 
large handle sizes (with appropriate 
adjustments in blade sizes, etc., to keep 
the knife in proportion) to fit small, 
medium and large hands? Though more 
companies are starling to do this, there 
are a few that still need to get with the 
program; 

•Why don't more companies (Shepherd 
Hills Cutlery would be a good one to 
emulate) and/or makers provide special 
educational programs/pamphlets and/or 
knives designed specifically for children'?; 
■Why aren't so-called limited-edition runs 
of knives truly limited, such as 500 pieces 
or less?; and 

• Why don't more knife companies do 
collaborative efforts such as the recent 
Boker/Gerber Applegate-Fairhairn dual 
commemorative? Granted, both Boker 
and Gerber have an Applegate-Fairbaim 
knife, which made the collaboration a no- 
brainer, but there are other examples 
where companies could work together on 
a knife or knife set. Makers are way 
ahead of the companies in this regard. 

If you have any "Why Don't Theys" 
you'd like to add, please send them to: 
BLADE Magazine®, 700 E. State St., 
Iola.Wl 54990- Blade 




Why don f more knife companies collaborate on joint projects, as Boker and Gerber 
have on the Applegate-Falrbairn Limited Edition Set? 

6 •■ BLADE 



A COVER 
STORY 




The Frank Centofante II C50G by 
Spyderco is designed by Centofante, a 
BLADE Magazine Cutlery Hall Of 
Famer®, and features the patent-pending 
SecureLock™. a back-up safety mecha- 
nism that keeps the knife's linerlock® 
from accidentally disengaging once the 
blade is locked open. The lever for the 
SecureLock is on the left side of the knife 
handle, which situates it by the right-hand 
user's thumb for easy access. 

The handle is G-10, the blade is ATS- 
34 with a Rockwell hardness of 59-61 RC, 
and the knife comes in two closed sizes: 4 
inches (the Frank Centofante C25G, 
$129.95 suggested retail price) and 5 
inches (the C50G. $149.95 SRP). Each 
knife features a non-reversible, lip-down 
clip. Overall weights: 2-3 ounces. 

"The SecureLock 

keeps the blade 

from accidentally 

disengaging." 

For more information on the new 
folder, see this issue's story on the latest 
factory knives for 1998, or contact 
Spyderco, attn: J. Laituri, Dept. BL, FOB 
800. Golden, CO 80402-0800 (303) 279- 
8383. 

The cover shot is by Ross Hubbard. 
The inset shot is courtesy of TNT Two 
for Texas ©1997 TBS. Inc.. a Time 
Warner Co. All Rights Reserved. The 
inset photo is by Erik Heinila. Blade 




JUNE 98 



It Ain't 




w£ 




The 

NEW 

^ Wild, Wild 

Turkey from 

Kershaw Knives 



Teflon- 
coated 
bushings for 
super-smooth 
operation 



Stainless steel thumb-stud 
for one-handed open and dose 



Unique, slotted handle is 
lightweight, tough, and easy-clean 



Laser-cut stainless steel blade, 
hand-honed to a "shaving sharp" finish 

Removable pocket clip for easy carrying 



kerskaw 

k n i vm E s 



25300 SW Parkway Avenue ■ Wilsonvilie, 
Phone:{503)682-1966 ■ (800) 325-2891 
Or visit our website at kershawknives.com 



But everything you wont in a lough, titanium-handled pocket knifejr sure is. 

The new Wild-Wild Turkey from Kershaw has the features knife-users ore asking for- from its 

rugged, ATS34 stainless steel blade (rated at 59-61 an the Rockwell hardness scale) la its slim, hi-tech 

styling. The unique, slotted handle design is exceptionally lightweight, making it comfortable to carry in your 

pocket. But because it's manufactured from super-tough, bead-blasted titanium, the Wild-Wild Turkey is also 

extremely durable- and wildly handsome. The thumb-stud allows convenient one-handed opening ond 

closing on smooth, Teflon®-toated bushings. An internal liner locks the blade in position. And if that's 

not enough, there ore three other precision-built knives in the 1 430 series to cfioose from: 

Model 1430, The Wild-Wild Turkey 

Handle- Tilaniam, 3 W (9.8m) 

Blade- ATS34 Stainless Steel, 3 '/«" 17.9cm.) 

Weight- 2 'A 02. 

Model 1431, The G-10 Wild Tvrkey 

Handle- G-10, 3 Vs" (9.8cm.) 

Blade- ATS34 Stainless Steel, 3 W (7.9cm.) 

Weight- 1 V* oi 

Model 1435, The Ti-Hawk 

Handle- Titanium, 4 3 /s"(H.0cm.} 

Blade- ATS34 Stainless Steel, 3 W (8.5cm.) 

Weight- 3.0 02 

Model 1436, The G-10 Hawk 

Handle- G-10, 4 Will. 0cm.) 

Blade- ATS34 Stainless Steel, 3 W (8.5cm.) 

Weight- 1 'V* 02. 



97070 
Fax:(503)682-7168 



And they're all backed by Kershaw's 
limited lifetime warranty. 

For your nearest Kershaw dealer, call 
800-325-2891. 



The 
Incredible 



Folders 



Pronounced "Jnnff-lee" 



All Junglee 
Knives come with a 
•~ Limited Lifetime 
"1. Warranty 



K02041 Marsbatf Jr. 

■ 2-S/B" Blade, 1-1 a" Closed 

■ AUSIO.3.5 oi. 
Sujufntsd BtrnH 
Mc»*M.fS 



* "Do rr right. Don't take shortcuts. Use the best materials." 

*»■ This is our philosophy in building fine knives, Wc use the most durable materials and superior knife 
making skills of master cutlers from Scki, Japan and around the world. Our knives are backed up with 
a Lifetime Warranty - BUY WITH CONFIDENCE! 




WHOLESALE 
ONLY 



l 3 , ! l T!r? < J , ! , T«!M;!]'n •bi^ib 1^17 



INTRODUCING THE NEW GENERATION OF FINE KNIVES 



"" "" "ifftrto 



iforg 

K04014 Scrimshaw 
Lockback — Eagle 

J" Blade. 3-7/B" Closed, '{ , 

440 Sulntejs Steel, 3,S op_ ; 'J1 
Suggested Retail Price $29.95 



■-,J;. 






3231 



txpfo 



K04021 Explorer 4x4 

MM" 8 lade, S-l/4" Closed 
440C Stainless Steel, 7.2 oi. 
Suggested Retail Price $59.95 



■ jags 






ITUBBVJ 




/%& 



&p 




K04000 Baby Stubby 

I -S/8" Blade. 2-3/B" Closed 
420-J2 Stainless Steel, 1.1 i.i. 
Suggested Retail Price $ I 1,95 




K04001 stubby" Ta 
Silver/Semi-Serrate 

2-l/4"Blade,3-l/4"CloW 
420-J2 Stainless Steel, I 
Suggested Retail Pric- 



K04071 Stubby Tanto 
Black/Semi-Serr 

7.-1/4" Blade, 3-1/4" Close 
420-J2 Stainless Steel. 1,9 oz. 
Suggested Retail Price $ 1 7,' 



m 

.*c* r 






K04024 Explorer' 4x4 
— Rosewood 

1- 1/4" Blade, 5- 1 M" Closed 
440C Stainless Steel, 7.2 oz. 
Suggested Retail Price $69.95 



WHOLESALE ONL. 



V 



K04009 Ruffian III 
— Raior 

2-5/8" Blade. 4" Closed 
440C Stainless Steel. 1.9 oz. 
Suggested Retail Price $35. 



FOR A DEALER NEAR YOU 



READERS RESPOND 



This Is Your Column! And we want to know what you think. Do 
you tike what you've read in BLADE®? Do you have a 
complaint? A suggestion? An opinion you'd tike to share with the 
largest knife audience in the world-71,000 readers per issue? 



Mail your comments to: BLADE, P.O. Box 789, Ooltewah, TN 
37363-0789, or visit our web site: www.krause.com or e-mail: 
biade@krause.com. We reserve the right to edit your comments 
to fit the space available. 



Reader Questions Fowler 

Why Blades Are Not Primary Weap- 
ons" by Ed Fowler in the Decem- 
ber '97 BLADE® caught my attention. 
Fowler should stick to what he knows — 
making fine knives. His description of 
taking blades away from undesirables 
during his tenure as a police officer 
would be ludicrous if it weren't for the 
fact thai he may actually get some young 
police officer killed. 

Fowler shows his lack of qualification 
to be a police officer with his statement 
that he "never wanted to take another 
person's life unless it was absolutely 
necessary." which is an admirable trait. 
However, he "didn't consider (his) own 
defense as qualifying as absolutely neces- 
sary." Thank God most of those with 
such an attitude have been purged from 
law enforcement. 

Preserving life is the highest good but 
not when it involves the police officer 
giving up his own life to avoid killing 
some predator. When an officer sacri- 
fices his life because he refuses to use the 
proper degree of force, he endangers his 
brother officers and the public he's 
supposed to serve. 

I'm certified as an instructor with the 
side handle baton and spent three years 
learning the straight baton. I've also 
spent a number of years in the martial 
arts, learning fighting and control tech- 
niques. I've spent 23 years as a police 
officer in the Los Angeles, California, 
area. I've studied the knife as a tool and 
a weapon, so I feel I'm qualified lo speak 
on the subject. Anyone, even the most 
skilled of martial artists, who, when 
armed with a gun, chooses a baton for 
self-defense against someone who's 
armed with a knife is a fool. 

It's obvious that Fowler never faced 
anyone who knew what he was doing 
with a knife, as he states that on one 
occasion, he "felt sorry for (his) adver- 
sary." 

From a legal standpoint, the knife is a 
deadly weapon. A police officer 
shouldn't meet deadly force with a lesser 
degree of force, the baton. The law 
doesn'l require it and common sense 
dictates that an officer not do il. 

The fact that Fowler survived these 

10/ BLADE 



incidents is a combination of good luck, 
that his adversaries were unskilled and 
his own good fortune, not because of any 
ability on his part. 

Any skilled knife fighter will dispatch 
very quickly someone who chooses to 
defend himself with a baton over a gun. 

Louis C. Castle, Culver Cily, California 

Editor's note: Some well-constructed 
arguments, Mr. Castle. However, with all 
due respect, BLADE stands by Mr. 
Fowler and his story. 



Knife Future, Dupuis Style 

In response to your request for feed- 
back from BLADE readers on the 
future of knives, I'd like to propose the 
following; 

1. That the current trend toward tacti- 
cal/hi-tech combat knives and folders 
involves both the fascination with "new," 
exotic materials and mechanisms, and 
the knives' inexpensive cost compared to 
the handmades made a few years ago 
(i.e.. interframes of $l,000+). There also 
has been an increase in demand for 
simple slip joints in classic patterns and 
materials. Both of these knife types 
aren't only being collected but also are 
being used as practical tools, something 
that was almost unheard of just a few 
years ago: 

2. Knife trends — like art or fashion — 
move in cycles. The next few years will 
see an increased interest in older pieces 
from established makers and antique 
factory knives of American origin. With 
the popularity of knives, both factory 
and handmade, steadily growing, the 
blade-buying public will tire of the hi- 
tech scene and want to return to the 
basics: knives that were around 20, 3f) or 
even I (10 years ago. These pieces are 
limited in supply and the resulting 
demand will see prices soar; 

3. About four-to-six years from now, 
large straight knives and miniatures will 
be the cutlery of choice of many collec- 
tors. Knives were of a moderate size for 
most of the "80s and have been for all of 
the '90s. Therefore, interest in extreme- 
sized pieces (many of historical or 



geographical significance) will "take 
ofF'; and 

4. In about 10 years, pieces that are 
currently waning in interest (interframes, 
engraved art knives, etc) again will be 
popular. Publications and photography 
documenting these knives over the past 
5-15 years (such as BLADE and Jim 
Weyer's Points of Interest books) will 
help show the timeless beauty of such 
pieces. It will take, however, quite a few 
years for interest to resurface in these 
once market-saturated knives. 

The above speculation is contingent 
on non-interference from state, federal 
or even local law. For example, in 
Canada push daggers cannot become 
widespread and trendy as they recently 
were made illegal lo make or possess. 

Dave Dupuis, address n/a 



Tactical Folder Debate (cont.) 

What's wrong with having a knife 
that can be opened with one 
hand? Where is it written that only 
people in the service or law enforcement 
or emergency personnel have access to 
this type of knife? I've been collecting 
and using blades for over 30 years and 1 
think the factory and custom models 
available now are fantastic. Most of 
these so-called tactical pieces make 



"For those against 

such knives, don't 

buy them!' 



r« 



excellent, fast, lightweight utility blades 
that go almost unnoticed clipped to your 
pocket for every-day carry. For those 
opposed to such knives, don't buy them! 
The last time I looked there were still 
plenty of trapper and stockman pocket- 
knives for sale out there. Leave those of 
us alone who like the convenience of a 
lightweight one-handed folder. What's 
more, if some call these tactical folders, 
then so be il! 

Robert D. Haigh, Milton, Massachusetts 

Bladf. 
JUNE 98 



I WANT 




iS1998Matenglnc. 






ATTACH A PICTURE OF ANY PRODUCTION KNIFE 
FROM THE PAGES OF BLADE MAGAZINE TO THIS AD, 
AND TAKE IT TO YOUR FAVORITE, LOCAL CUTLERY 
DEALER. IF THEY DONT HAVE WHAT YOU WANT, TELL 
THEM THEY CAN GET IT FROM MOTENG. 



DEALERS, GET IT FROM 

ik Moteng 

Call: 800-367-5900 or 619-625-2777 

email: info@moteng.com 

MOTENG IS A WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTOR. DEALERS ONLY, PLEASE 



Steel Sidekicks 



arry 



ers 



n addition to Hie pieces illustrated in th 

story, several other nice carry folders an 
offered by knifemaker Robert Cupdepon. 

■i Cutlery (the Puma Flash), Sp; •'■ 
(the new Rescue Jr.) anil Kershaw ' 
Wild Wild Turkej |, I litre are, of c 
mam others. 




. 



"IYo|>le huy knives iii^i-jt 
Tor aesthetics than utility;" 

■ Matt Ctmahle 



What's the perfect carry folder for you? Keith Derkatz 
of Kaiz Knives may be closer than some think when 
he said. "If it looks good, feels good and appeals to 
you, that's it." 

Though many of you already know what you like and need, 
there are no doubt some of you who may not know exactly what it 
is you're looking for in a carry folder. As knifemaker Ken Onion 
pointed out. many novice Made enthusiasts buy everything that's 
"new and hot" at first. "After a year or so of this, they learn 
they've bought a bunch of knives they can't use," he observed. 
"It's then that they settle on exactly what it is that they want." 

To cover all the bases, first ask yourself exactly what your blade 
needs are. To help decide which carry folder is best for you. 
BLADE® devised a list of questions and ran them by custom and 
factory knife people for their observations on the subject. 

Use 

There was near unanimity on what question you should ask your- 
self first concerning your carry folder: What use will you put the 
knife to most? 
"The first thing I ask a customer is what he's going to use the 



knife for," knifemaker Wally Watts noted. 

"You might use it to skin an animal but more likely you'll use it 
to skin fruit, open boxes or letters or clean your fingernails," Matt 
Conable of William Henry Knives observed. "That's what most 
carry knives get used for. no matter their size." 

However, like life, there are few absolutes. "People buy knives 
more for aesthetics than utility," Conable qualified. "When 1 look 
at how popular the SPECWAR. combat-oriented tactical folders 
are, I have to think people are making their choice hased on 
aesthetics because I don't know too many people who go around 
piercing armor with their knives, which is what some of the tacti- 
cal pieces are designed for." 

Comfort 

The next question to ask yourself: Is the knife of a size and feel 
that you'll went to cany it? As knifemaker Ernest Emerson said, 
no matter how neat or cool the knife may appear, if you don't 
carry it. it's of no use to you. "Does it fit your hand good, is it easy 
and lightweight to carry? You need something you can use all day 
without raising a blister," Onion noted. 
"Put it in your pocket and see how it feels. When you rub your 



12' BLADE 



JUNE OH 



HOW TO PICK 





CARRY 
FOLDER 



! By Steve Shackleford 



-X 



all over it, make 

sure it has no edges that hit you wrong," 

Conable advised. "Are the edges rounded and deburred? 

If they aren't, after about a half hour of using or carrying the 

folder, it will be very uncomfortable. If it feels good in your 

hand, that's a good indicator." 

A key to good knife feel is the handle material. Onion prefers 
the synthetics— Micarta®, G-10, carbon fiber, etc. — for their durabil- 
ity. "Some of the natural materials have eye appeal but they can shrink 
and scuff," he noted. 

Watts, on the other hand, said if you're going to spend a couple hundred 
dollars on a folder, you'll want a pretty bone or other natural material instead 
of Micarta, Conable seemed to agree. 

"I like warm materials. By warm, I mean it looks warm and feels it," he 



Determine 
your needs and 

your choice 
will be a snap 



Examples of opposite sides 

oi the perfect carry knile 

spectrum: Watty Watts' 

two-btade sliplock tolder 

in tossil ivory and the 

latest Katz one-blade. 

carbon-fiber 

lockback. 



BLADE ■ 13 



Steel Sidekicks 

explained. "G-10 is so cold. It works good 
but it's loo cold. [ use cocobolo or jigged 
bone for handles. Ivory and pearl scare me 
because they're loo fragile." There's one 
exception to his rule. "1 use ivory Micarta 
with a satin finish," he said. "Now that's 
elegant! It has a softness to it when the 
light hits it. Plus, it's lightweight and 
stable." 

Associated questions to ask yourself are 
where you'll carry the knife and in what 
kinds of clothes. Will you carry it in the 
bottom of your pocket in pants of thick 
material, such as Levis, or thin material, 
such as dress pants? "That will determine 
the size and thickness of the knife," Watts 
said. "Those who live in big cities and 
travel a lot usually want a small knife, but 
around here (Texas) and in the South, 
people aren't really concerned about blade 
length. They specify the length to match 
the job." Of course, cheek local, stale and 
federal laws concerning blade lengths in 
your area. 

If you don't like the feel of a knife in the 
bottom of your pocket, there's always the 
clip. "Knife clips are at a premium," Onion 
said. "They make the knife accessible. It 
doesn't just sit in your pocket and leave a 
big lump," There's also the question of 
whether you want a clip that's reversible — 
attachable on both the left or right sides of 
the grip — or lip up or lip down (the latter is 
where the open end of the clip points 
toward the handle hull). 

Lightweight pieces appeal to a large 
segment. "Most (blade enthusiasts) like 
lightweight knives but they don't want to 
sacrifice strength," Conable said. "If they 
can get an ultra-lightweight knife with 
structural integrity, that seems to be the 
optimum now. However, some find more 
confidence with the heft of a piece and, if 
it's ultra-light, they don't think they've got 
enough knife." 



Does Ii Cut? 

Any number of questions address a knife's 
cutting performance, such as: Which steel 
and how should it be heat treated? Does 
the blade have proper edge geometry (is it 
too thick, too thin or "just right")? Is one 
blade enough? What should the blade 
shape be? Should the edge be straight, 
serrated or a combination? Should the 
grind be hollow. Hat. chisel or convex? 

As for the steel, you'll get any number of 
answers, though the heat treatment and 
edge geometry can be just as important. 
Onion uses 440-C mainlv but also the 
powdered metals— CPM 420V and CPM 
440V— and stellite. Watts and Conable 
prefer ATS-34. There are many other 

"Every knife should 
be designed with a 
specific purpose." 

— Ken Onion 

stainless and non-stainless steels from 
which to choose. 

Onion prefers a Rockwell hardness of 
59-60 RC for his 440-C and powdered 
metals, while the stellite stays at 57-59 RC. 
"For everyday use, 440-C is a good, stan- 
dard steel. It's so corrosion resistant, has 
good edge holding and is very tough," he 
said. For maximum edge holding and 
corrosion resistance, he recommends 420V 
and stellite. "They just cost more," he 
advised. As for 42l)V's reputation for being 
hard to sharpen, he said that if a 420V 
blade is ground nice and thin, it should 
sharpen easily. "If a 420V blade is ground 
too thick before the edge is set, then it's 
hard to sharpen," he said. 

Added Conable: "A blade with ATS-34 
at 59-f>0 RC with a good thin edge and 
taper to back it up so it stays sharp is an 
effective tool." Chimed in Walls: "ATS is a 
good steel and it's stainless. 1 heal treat all 
my ATS blades to 59 RC 
and thev 



HU»«» ft 



•'Kb 



;■*> 



€ 



• 



m 



sharpen up relatively easily and hold an 
edge good." 

Blade shape is pretty much up to you. 
Onion said, "though 1 think every knife 
should he designed with a specific purpose, 
whether technical, tactical or whatever." 
As for two or more blades, Walts prefers 
the multi-blade for its diversity, "Thai's 
why so many people carry trappers." he 
commented. "Most people who use a knife 
like to keep one blade back that's real 
sharp just for cutting animal flesh and 
other special needs." 

"Thai's a good argument," Conable said 
when he heard Watts' rationale, "but I've 
always gotten by with just one blade. I'd 
rather have one good blade than 10 stuck 
in there just because you can gel them in 
there." 

Onion said thai one blade will suffice 
because it should hold an edge for at least 
one day. after which time you should be 
home in time to resharpen it if need be. 
Besides, he carries two knives — one of his 
folders and a small Swiss Army knife, the 
latter for "grungy or detail jobs" so he can 
save his folder for special culling chores. 

As for the edge. Onion tikes ii serrated 
for the first third of the blade past the 
guard. "The best serration is Kit Carson's 
by far," he noted. "It's a convex serration 
that lends itself lo culling without tearing." 
Katz has both straight and serrated blades. 
"A straight edge is just as good as a 
serrated edge," Derkatz opined. On his 
serrated models, the serrations cover three- 
fourths of the blade from base to tip, "If 
the entire blade is serrated, the material 
being cut lends to ball up in the serra- 
tions," he explained. Both Conable and 
Watts offer straight edges only. Some 
prefer the straight edge for whittling and 
cutting string, while serrations seem partic- 
ularly adept at cutting heavy line and card- 
board. If current sales at retail knife stores 
are any indication, the combination edge is 
most popular. 

As for the grind, opinions vary. The 
hollow grind is designed for slicing and 
ease of sharpening and is probably the one 
used most. Some makers say the flat grind 
is the strongest and most versatile. The 
chisel is a variation of the flat 
grind and is designed 
for prying 



"A folder has to have 
gadget appeal/ 

— Ken Onion 



?f 



Proper knife balance can be a key for an 
optimum carry folder, as demonstrated 
on this piece made by Matt Conable 
under the William Henry Knives label. 



14 /BLADE 



JUNE 98 



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Steel Sidekicks 

(inadvisable with a folder) and puncture 
strength. Bladesmiths seem to prefer the 
convex grind, which is ideal for heavy 
cutting and chopping (also inadvtsahle with 
a folder), 

Looks 

As Conahle noted earlier, aesthetics play a 
pivotal role in many carry folder purchases. 
Proper mechanics are also a key. All 
moving parts should fit flush and tight. 
"The knife should have everything engi- 



neered out properly. It should have a good 
handle-lo-blade ratio. "In other words." 
Onion explained, "the blade should be as 
close to the same size as the handle as 
possible. The knife must have good flow, 
symmetry and geometry. If you run a 
straight edge from the tip of the hlade to 
the butt of the handle, it should be a 
straight line." 

But there's more to it than thai. Do you 
like the way the knife looks? Perhaps more 
importantly, does it make a statement 
about your taste in knives? 

"Even if you don't buy the knife think- 
ing about how it fits into your image. 




you're still making your choice based on 
how you see yourself." Conahle said. "If 
yoo buy the biggest tactical folder you can 
find, that's a statement when you pull it out 
of your pocket. On the other hand, if you 
take a 2 1/2-inch Jot Khalsa damaseus 
folder with gold filigree and opal out of 
your pocket, that's a different statement 
entirely." 

The Toy Factor 

When it comes down to it, carry folders 
aren't only tools but toys as well. After all. 
how many times have you seen a grown 
man obsessively opening and closing a 
manual one-hander as if it's an adult 
version of a yo-yo? With that in mind, what 
kind of blade-opening mechanism should 
yoor carry folder have? 

Conable makes linerlocks® only, though 
"I don't claim to know enough to know 
whether the linerlock is better or worse 



v* 



n 



Official Licensed Reproduction 

Distributed Exclusively By 

PROFESSIONAL CUTLERY SERVICES 

9718 Washburn Road, Downey, California 90241 

800/356-8507 FAX 562/803-4261 



Around here, people 
specify blade length 
to match the job/ 

— Wally Watts 



than other knife mechanisms. I like liner- 
locks because they're light and how much 
blade you can get in the handle. Linerlocks 
feel good the was ihe\ engage and disen- 
gage, and they can be lough if made of tita- 
nium hut still be lightweight." Onion said 
the linerlock is popular and has excellent 
mechanics if done right, "though all the 
mechanisms— linerlocks, loekbacks and 
sliploeks — have merit. I like them all." 

While Walts will make loekbacks, 
usually only on special orders, he swears by 
the sliplock. "I've told people for years you 
only cut with the sharp side." he winked. 
"I've never had a knife fold up on my 
fingers." 

No matter the mechanism, always exam- 
ine it thoroughly before buying the knife. 
"The mechanism should operate nice and 
smooth. Open the blade and flex it forward 
and backward and sideways to see if there's 
any play in it," Onion advised. Though 
there should be a small amount of play, 
neither should it be too loose. If it's a liner- 
lock with an adjustable tension screw, you 
should be able to adjust the tension with- 
out taking the knife apart, he added. 

Whichever mechanism you choose, pick 
the one that you enjoy operating. "A folder 
has to have a lot of gadget appeal," Onion 
stressed. "When you're sitting in your Lay- 
Z-Boy® at the end of the day, you want a 
knife that's like your best friend, one 
you've just got to have in your hand and 
roll around in your fingers and work the 
mechanism a few limes." 

For the addresses of the knives in this story, 
see "Where To Get 'Em" on page 95. BTjSE 



16 /BLADE 



JUNE 98 



Historic World Premier from the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund 

The Official Vietnam Veterans Collector Knife 



*/#/. 



*ir 



***m 



Shown approximately 

actual size ol 7W (19.69 cm). 



/ 




Limited Edition. 

Crafted to the highest standards, 

with a minted medallion depicting the 

compelling Vietnam Veterans Memorial Sculpture. 








To all those Americans who marie the ultimate sacrifice in 

'm\\ Vietnam, and to those who returned home without the 

i\ heroes' welcome they so justly deserved, a Stirling tribute 

—the first-ever collector knife issued by the Vietnam 

Veterans Memorial Fund. 

THE OFFICIAL VIETNAM VETERANS COLLECTOR KNIFE. 

With an original, full-color illustration by military artist 
Jim Dietz. featuring a squadron of "Huey" choppers bringing in reinforce- 
ments to the battlefield. The bolsters are precision cast and richly accented 
in sterling silver. Mounted to one bolster, a representation of the Vietnam 
Service Ribbon; to the other, a medallion depicting Frederick Halt's com- 
pelling Vietnam Veterans Memorial Sculpture, minted in solid bronze. With 
blade of stainless steel, and grips that match the look and feel of real rubber. 
The entire edition is forever 

limited to just 45 casting days. fj^m IH ,^«g| *Qi 
Complete with its own padded III Wr* • J 

and zippered case. Just $37.50. Wp*M E*' ^»= 'S ^Q 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. O^Z^ . . 

If you wish to return any Franklin 
Mint purchase, you may do so 
within 30 days of your receipt of 
that purchase for replacement, 
credit or refund, 

Franklin Mint Collector Knives. 
Perfecting A Collecting Tradition. 



A Limited Edition Collector Knife. 

Please mail by June 39, 1998. 

Franklin Mint Collector Knives 
Franklin Center, PA 19091-0001 

Please enter my order for The Official 
Vietnam Veterans Collector Knife . 
I need SEND NO MONEY now. I will be billed 

$37.50* when my knife is ready to be sent. Limit: 

one knife per collector. 

'Plus my stele sales tax and 
$3.95 tor shipping and handling. 




SIGNATURE . 



M, .nr.H'-.^i '. M... I roM CCTTOM I 



MR/MRS/MISS_ 
ADDRESS 



PLEASE PflWT CLt Aflir 



. APT. I . 



CITY. 



STATE- 



ZIP 



TELEPHONE I L 



J 



20052-06-001 

Sculpture © F.E. HART and V.V.M.F. 19B4. 

THE FRANKLIN MINT 



A 






THE KNIFE I CARRY 



a 



I carry a Spyderco 
Native, which has a 
slightly magnetic tip. 
Recently I was working 
on a copy machine to 
clear a paper jam and 
used the tip of the 
Native to help retrieve a 
small screw I'd 
dropped into the 
copier. You guessed 
it— I left the knife in the 
machine for two weeks. 
Nothing hurt, though, 



J5 



-Walt Piotrowski. 
Clarendon Hills, Illinois 




"The knife I carry every day is a Swiss Army Tinker. When hunting or fishing, I carry a Buck 
Model 105 Pathfinder that's almost 30 years old. It had been lost off the bed of my pickup but, 
with my name and phone number inside the sheath, it was returned by a good man. " 
-Robert D. Keene, Seneca, South Carolina 




"I normally carry two knives at all times, one being a Chris Reeve Sebenza 
Worker. The other is a 4-inch Marble's Woodcraft repro by P.J. Tomes. 

These two knives can do it all. " -Ralph Meriino. Sylmar. California 

18 /BLADE 




/\¥^¥ 



Just tell us briefly what knife you 
carry. Add a little history or an 
interesting anecdote. Try to 
include a sharp photograph of 
you and your knife. We'll publish 
your comments in an upcoming 
"The Knife I Carry." Your name 
will then be entered in a drawing 
to win a free 1996 IBCA Robe- 
son knife from Queen Cutlery. 
Drawing to be held Nov. 15, 
1998. Mail to: Blade 
Magazine®, P.O. Box 789, 
Ooltewah, TN 37363-0789. 




JUNE 98 






A Historic World Premiere X 

The Ancient Dagger of the Maya \ 

/ he mysterious Maya of Central America are famed for their dazzling cultural 
achievements' Advanced mathematical knowledge. Accurate astronomical recordings, 
ftov 1 ^^ *?//%-}#*> * \u<l iirtii'Dili offassinntmg bctwtif. 
*J* " » Cortez and his conquistadors melted down artifacts for their precious metals and 

Is* f^ V /^> -^ Others Ihat lollowcd them destroyed most remaining Mayan-Aztec 

'* ^* cultural objects. Painstakingly researched. The Dagger of the Maya is an 

authentic recreation of one of the highest achievements of Mayan 
craftsmanship of the Classic period. It depicts Chac, the god of rain and 
lightning, the most powerful Mayan deity. 

\ \ 

I he Dagger has heen intricately sculpted hy a master artisan, Each 

piece is hand polished to a gulden bronze glow. The blade is fully 
tempered stainless sleeL. t|»c piece measures 9 inches in length 
and comes with a custom designed presentation hoard lined in 
;ht IhYs skinning w«rk of art. 

this is the piremiere pieceVrom Mistoria, The Noble Collection's 

new group oY collectibles that combine the highest standards of 

quality with the enchannnoil and Mystery of legend and 

history. It is iffered at the issue price of kve payments pf S24.50* 

in a Strictly limited edilio l of 30 casting nays after w hich (he 

mold will be destroyed. A certificate of authenticity and 

historic reference material accompany each piece. 



m 



♦*IM V) 



,M" 1 



Unconditional Guarante 

,li vim are mil absolutely delighted 
j>uxch<ise you may return it within 30 
full refund. 



30 navs fur a 



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dispfa\ ho 

I he- tW^gi 

, l,i \ ."mr hi en 



RESERVATION FORM 
AvjMjM.' euhisivety through I hi Neblt Collection ■ Ropoml by Inn* IS, WW 
Please enter my reservation for The Dagger of the Maya. 1 need 
SEND NO MONEY NOW, I will be billed in five monthly 
installments of $24.50*. The first payment will be due prior to 
shipment. 
Limit: one dagger per collector 

Name 

I'll 1M I -KIM i I I Akl t 



"it is shim ii 



■I U|HiliiMI!l;lliK 
iieluul si/i- offl iin In" 



Address. 



Citv- 



. State. 



Zip. 



Telephone {. 



Masterfully crafted. A strictly Limited Edition. 
Exclusively from The Noble Collection. 



Signature . 



*Plu*$4,5f> [pf *hippppiF mtd handling Sale ui* will h- hilled 11 itpplit 
AJ] unkn arc tutijrcl I.) actepupurf nrtd jupl^lsilii). 



nun . sixis: I 



Mail to: The Noble Collection 
P.O. Box 1476, Sterling, VA 20167 



Black-On-Black 



Other Pieces 
Available In 
All-Black 

Ka-Kur Black Tanto 
Gerber Guardian Back -I Ip 
Kui-k Nighthawk, fully serrated 
Browning Kodiak 1 .1X1. wis 
Mud 11 Tactical Tornado 
Spyderco Military C36 



1 By Joe Kertzman 



ft hey 're regulators of all things alien 
on earth. They are our best, last and 
only tine of defense when close 
encounters get ugly. They work in secret 
and they dress in black. 

We acknowledge our debt to the 
spoof hit of 1997, but these words could 
equally apply to the current rage for 
blades in black. They're dressed in black 
handles that melt into the background of 
dark pants legs, discreetly, like black on 
black. 

"Black is more subdued and less 
conspicuous," Mark McWillis, product 
line manager of Bench made Knife Co., 
says, "A black knife with a black clip 

20 / BLADE 



HUES 



blends into the background of the dark 
pants most people wear. It doesn't draw 
attention to itself." 

Benchmade's latest collaboration 
with Allen Elishewitz comes in the form 
of the Stryker with a double-ground, 
ATS-34 blade featuring a black BT2 
finish. Black G-K) handle slabs put the 
finishing touches on the overall black 
effect. 

"When you have multiple colors 
available in your product line, black sells 
better than other colors," McWillis 
notes. "Some people just like black. 
Twenty years ago. shotguns were wood 
stock and blued. Now everyone from 
Remington to Colt makes guns in all 
black." 

In addition to aesthetic reasons for 
black, McWillis says there are practical 



applications. As far as he knows, G-1Q is 
not available in any other color, and 
black is non-reflective, a sought-after 
feature in military and paramilitary situa- 
tions. 

"We don't coat with our BT2 coaling 
to make the blade black." McWillis adds. 
"The reason we're doing it is for corro- 
sion resistance. ATS-34 is corrosion 
resistant but it will rust if you let it. A lot 
of people carry this knife in their waist- 
band where it's very hot and humid. This 
Teflon m -based coaling helps prevent 
rust. The ancillary benefit is that it's 
black." 

How the BT2 coating will wear. 
McWillis says, depends on how the knife 
is used. "We don't get a lot of them back 
from people complaining they're not 
satisfied with ihe coating." he says. 

JUNE 98 



"Nothing is what it 

seems; they are the 

best kept secret in 

the universe" 
-From the movie 

Men In Black 



Men are seemingly enchanted by black- black handles, 
black blades, black knives. United Cutlery meets the 
demand for black with the CT24 Colt Python designed 
by Ken Onion. It sports a 3 5/8-inch, black, 420 J2 
stainless steel blade and a black aluminum handle. 



W BLACK 



The Price For Looking Good 

The cost for "wearing black" is nominal. 
In Benchmade's case, $10 is added on to 
the retail cost for the BT2 coating, and if 
the coating wears, the blade can be 
replaced for $35, The all-blaek Slrykcr 
carries a suggested retail price of 
$149.95. 

"I carry around a black ITC1Q93 
(United Orion interlock®) just because I 
like the black look," Kil Rae of United 
Cutlery says. "Typically, if you offer a 
few colors, one will sell two-to-one over 
another. If you get a good response from 
two colors, you're doing well. Black has 
been selling as well as our grey blades." 

United is offering the CT24 Colt 
Python liner lock designed by Ken Onion 
in both black and grey versions. Each is 4 
3/4 inches closed with a black or sand- 

JUNE 98 



blasted 420 J2 stainless steel blade and a 
cast aluminum handle with a black- or 
silver-coated finish. The Python comes 
with a black, reinforced nylon pouch and 
retails for $56.29. 

"Made in black." like Men In Black, 
seems to be a catch phrase people are 
drawn to. "The old satin finish, the stain- 
less look, has been around in the indus- 
try for a long time," Rae reasons. "It's a 
tired look in the market." 

So, black is back, and it's tougher 
than ever. The black version of the Coll 
Python has the same hard, weather-proof 
coating used on camera casings. 

"We played around with different 
coatings," Rae explains. "Some wouldn't 
chip and would last a lifetime, but they 
cost as much as the knife. We carry 
around a camera that 1 looked at and 




said, 

'Hey. 

what 

about 

the same 

coating they 

used on our 

camera?" We 

sourced it, went to 

the factory that makes 

it. and now both the 

silver and black versions 

of the CT24 have that 

camera coaling." 

Rae claims that in United's 
15-year history, there have been 
no complaints about the coatings 
they use. "We've hecn doing a lot of 

BLADE/ 21 



Black-On-Black 



sandblasting, bui we jusl started on the 
black blades." Rae imparts. "We've been 
wanting to do black blades for a long 
time, but we wanted to find the right 
materials first." 

A Stealth Appearance 

"We're going in the direction of an all- 
black stealth appearance," Chuck Hoff- 
man of Boker USA says. "Maybe it's a 
fad, but it's a popular segment of the 
market. We've had requests for the Top 
Lock in all-black. When we bring an 
order in. they're sold out before they 
land." 

Is black a manly color'.' Is it a muscle- 
pumping, reaction-getting, impulse- 
buying color that's the secret to knife 
sales success in the industry? 

Hoffman regards a black, tactical 
appearance as more appealing to men 
than women. "If they appeal to the gals, 
it's because guys are asking for them," 
he declares. "Benchmade has been doing 
this style longer than anyone. Les de 
Asis either picked up on a trend or 
started one. Ask Les! If anybody led the 
industry into a black tactical look, it was 



With a black blade and a blued guard 
and pommel, it's engineered to be non- 
reflective. 

Macho Men In Black 

"That kniTe was derived through military 
channels where there's definitely interest 
in low reflectivity," Frazer says. "For 
practical purposes, it's probably more of 
a macho-type look." 

For those who aren't members of 
special operations groups, but who are 
looking for a macho knife, Frazer 
suggests the black TiNi Autoclip. Taking 
the patented clip from the Autoclip 
series (a ciip operated with a quick turn 
of a thumb wheel on the handle for 
several attachment options), and 
combining it with a titanium nitride 
finish. Frazer says the TiNi Autoclip 
resulted in a useful, wear-resistant knife 
that's aesthetically pleasing. The 
suggested retail price is $5'). "5. 

"People who arc more knowledge- 
able are upgrading to our TiNi finish for 
edge enhancement." Frazer says, "It's 
one of the best coatings for stainless 
steel and only a $5-$ 10 upgrade. The end 



The Teflon-based coating helps prevent rust. 
The ancillary benefit is that it's black." 

-Mark McWillis, Benchmade 



Benchmade." 

Benchmade's McWillis won't argue. 
"More men buy knives, period," he 
states. "Over ninety-nine percent of our 
customers arc male. If women buy 
knives, they're for gifts, at least in our 
case." 

"1 think they're being purchased by 
would-be tactical users," Hoffman adds. 
"They're not all being bought by law 
enforcement officials and Navy SEALS 
for their non-re fleet ive qualities in true 
tactical situations." 

Hoffman's version of a knife with a 
non-reflective blade is the Boker Omega 
II G10 Super Liner. It sports a sleek, 
black, partially-serrated, 440-C blade 
with a titanium nitride coating, a 
textured GIO handle, a clip and a 
lanyard hole. The Interlock has a tita- 
nium thumb stud for one-hand operation 
and retails for $175. 

The nitride coating adds $35 to the 
consumer cost for the knife. "If you look 
at ours, even the clip and screws arc 
Teflon-coated," Hoffman explains. 
"Each adds to the labor cost, which adds 
to the overall cost of the knife." 

Spencer Frazer of SOG Specialty 
Knives says his company was built 
around the SOG bowie, a knife based on 
pieces used by special operations groups 
and the 5th Special Forces in Vietnam. 

Gutmann 's Military Bolo would blend into 
the background of any dark, murky jungle. 



result is knives with 55-58 RC ratings." 

"The coaling has been used on indus- 
trial drill bits, and the companies using it 
are getting five-to-10-limes the life out 
of their drill bits." adds company repre- 
sentative Ron Anderson. "We've used 
black oxide in the past, but we feel this is 
one of the best coatings. I'm in the 
warranty department, and I've never 
seen a knife returned for the coaling 
wearing off." 

"You lake a hard blade, apply Teflon 
to it. and you've got a very smooth, slick 
knife with an anti-rusting agent that aids 
in the cutting process," says Shiraz Balo- 
lia of Gutmann Cutlery. 

Gutmann offers the Junglee Military 
Bolo, a 19-inch knife with an AUS-8, 
Teflon-coated blade, a Kraton® handle 
and a Kydex® sheath. It retails for 
$129.95. 

According to BaJolia, one advantage 
of the hard, durable Teflon is "you can 
chisel away at, and you might scratch it." 
Even so, coating the blade is a separate, 
subcontracted process. It increases cost 
and Gutmann can not apply another 
coat to a blade that may have been 
abused, he adds. 

"You could shave with them." Balo- 
lia insists. "I use a short sword with the 
same coating in my boat to cut up dog 
fish that have poisonous spikes on their 
backs. It's always exposed lo salt water. 
The button on the sheath rusts, hut the 
rest of the knife has not." 



22 / BLADE 



JUNE 98 





ALL OUR KNIVES OPEN 

WITH ONE HAND. IN CASE YOU'RE 

BUSY WITH THE OTHER 



THE 820, 830. AND 840 ARE LIGHTWEIGHT IN OUNCES ONLY. THESE 



■""""V*. PRECISION KN1VIS F1ATUBE DURABLE ZYTEL 1 HANDLES, 

|^^ ^^^^. AMBILlEXTflOUS OPENING HOLES LICENSED BY 

such loyally in Banchmade owners. For example, our pocket clips aie tough stainless steel 

^ SPYDEBCO. AND AYS 34 STEEL DUDES 

you want one, yet easily removable if you don't We use Torx screws throughout They can bB cranked 

more tightly without stripping, and allow for more control over blade tension. The trick, you see, isn't mak- |^ 

ing knives that give you what you're looking for. It's making knives that give you what you just might overlook. 



BENCHL iADE 



HELD TO A HIGHER STANDARD. 



LIJCATEC IM ::KU:;ir, Lilt UHEGOf* i:ALL US AT 1 -300 MO lill OR VISIT OUR WEBSITE WWW.EJENCHMADE COM. 



Balolia says tht 
black coating is popular 
for other reasons and may 
he a mind-set triggering 
images of covert operations 
in the field. 

"Everyone's (especially men) 
buying it. It's a popular color for 
us," he says. "I can say that it's more 
popular with men because we offer 
pouches with our folders as a cour- 
tesy. At first, we were giving away red 
pouches, but the men were saying 
they looked like ladies' sunglass 
pouches. They wanted black ones." 

"I'd say we'll definitely have more 
offerings in black next year." Frazer 
predicts. 'It's an area that's growing, 
though I ill in "I see il taking over the 
stainless market." 

The takeover may have already 
begun. Only an elite few know the 
truth. Our future is in the hands of 
secret agents working for the Depart- 
ment Of Immigration against alien 
infiltration. They're dressing in 
black— with blades of black. 

For the addresses of the knifemukers 
in this story, see "Where To Get 'Em" 
on page 95. BlaS 



\M ' 



4* 



Black-On-Black 



Benchmade achieves 

blackness in collaboration 

with Allen Elishewitz 

on the Stryker. It features 

a double-ground, ATS-34 

blade with a black BT2 

finish and a black 

G-tO handle. 






k NETWGLUv LH-" CLASSIHIEDSL 



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THE BLADE LIST CLASSIFIED ORDER FORM IN THIS ISSUE 



24 / BLADE 



JUNE 98 



wmn&m 



"Night Chant* 

from 

David Ycllo whorse* 

The Navajo used the ceremony of 
the Night Chant to restore spiritual well 
being. Renowned Navajo artist David 
Yellowhorse has created a magnificent 
new knife using the Night Chant's uplift- 
ing symbol, the yeibichai (yay bu chay) as 
its focal point. Crafted in nickel silver, 
desert ironwood, purple spiny oyster, 
black jet, chryscolla, and turquoise, Night 
Chant is the third in a special series creat- ■ 
ed specially for United Cutlery. like the 
others, Night Chant promises to sell out in 
a matter Of weeks and gain value swiftly. 

Strictly limited to a one-time-only produc- 
tion of just 600, Night Chant is presented 
in a glass-top walnut display case, com- 
plete with certificate of authenticity. 



1-800-548-0835 






*0. 






ftj. 



KET»T7i?»HiiMirnrr 






tfaO--*' • 



i" CSA7 *% 



&*¥&; 



mmm-4 



David Yellowhorse* is a silversmith by trade, but 
has waited until now to introduce his first collection 
using solid precious metal. This premier edition fea- 
tures one full troy ounce of .925 solid sterling silver 
for each knife. Every knife is individually serialized. 
Each knife has its own presentation quality hardshell 
display case, plus a certificate of authenticity 
personally autographed by David Yellowhorse. 
Production strictly limited to 2,500 pieces each. 

Always look for the signature: 




it.'.'. 2(£ 


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t I HI IKY lfUANI>S 



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Kit includes Fatal 5 h" sewed muslin wheels, 
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Speedy Arbor size 1 1 2". W, ,V4") 

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8" KIT 79.95 

III" KIT .99.95 

WHEELS 

Concentric Sewed Muslin 
Specify Arbor Size (1/2", 5/8", V-Tl 
15 H UP 

SI/.K EACH ''.mi 



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8" J 3/i" HI."H 

liriirt- li.ii 

LiHise Muslin Wheels 
Specify ArhorSize (1/2", i/S". 3/4") 
M ■* it 

Sjffi Ml] EACH 




Used by pfOfcSSiBSifa lor vi/ut clejji edfiL'S 
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it for ik-.iiiuis nod piilistiiiiK. .ill cbrnpamd! 
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*■!«<) 6" set 1 5.00 SiKSN (f ' sel I7.W 



SILVER SERIES 



i' 



The Silver VIimknc jnd Silver Fits jrt twu <i1 iht- 
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The SirJili.' Sdver tinlsters jre pre sh aped jihJ Mip 
nlied « ith [mis tfee prftiraurt i|UjLily t40-C 
hiuilcs tuve prt 1 dnlled Dji ijiirs. nukiii^ the ii.ui 

die% easj t" shape 

Silver Moose 7 V H M overall with 3" blade 

SSS73 Bladeimly &5Q 

5S573* KB ■ $4-75 

Silver PW 6 V K r overall with I 3/4" Made 
SS-T4 Blade only .,.- ls"S 

KS-Ttt Kit 2^1! 



CI STOM KITS 
The tils heti»w include sEJinless strel pre- 
slij]xd hliiile. hrj» rivets, tuhitiK. guard and 
hjiidle nuEeri^l .ih.l sttp-by-siep iiisirtuiimis 

APVCIIH 111 NTl'.R 



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H in' owrall wiih 3 l/i" bliilr 

SSntil Apjchi Waili- mly 17 i:i 

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sioi x 111 mm 

7 5:11" overall wilh l" htjdi- 

SS-liK Siiiiiv Hiailv ulth .17.58 

SSMSK Cnnijiii'ti- HI - - ... J?.')i 

(BETErWE HUXTER 



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1 1 |je Irniiiliiiii^l sly It- entlerv sel incliitles 
pre-shapetl surgical styinless hlides shnwn 
above plus h.irulli- nulerijl. nnd rivets 
tuning set yttJ >ieyii sel also ftvaUubk 



SS80I 1 1 in Triidinuml Sel 
SS807 * C:inini; Sel 
SSKIH ** SleatSel 



.69.95 
19.50 
J5')5 



I IIJRT KIT 



Sharp, l>e\ihle siuinless stt'ei hlaJe is 12" over- 
all. Kit contains Made, ivory micarla lianilli 1 
matLTial :iuti nirktc sitter pills. Fast to mnke. 
SS'llOK Fillet Kit IdSls 



\m 'i4ik; blades 

OITRACK BOWIE 



<i t.'K" overall with h l/i" hUi- 

SShO! OteH'iliiL' Itlaile onlf 
SS495* (Jmipleti' Kil....- -'.._ 

KAW SKIWF.R 



1 1" ofiTall wufi i H hlade 
SS-KJ Kjh Blaili- unly 



2s Si 

SS"S2K Completi- hit JAM 

NAVAJO SKININEK 



B 7'S" oierail with H I. h" Made 

S.S~m Savaitp Wade onlt 22.2i 

SS"S*K t Jim* tf Kil : W2I1 



TEXAS BOVUK KIT 




Tile Texas Bimic Bade. 1 12 I 2" iivmll. ■" v I 
1/2" ■ J/HV thick hljili'l. hrxv. jh.ii.- ...i il piini 
itii'l arid a prrdrl lli-d dvnumdwiMjd hlittk lur du' 
li.uiilli 

SShoh Blade nnlv 17.95 

SSH95K Kit rompiflf .WW 



AL\M(I BOWIE KIT 



The Abnit) Made is 15" tiver;ill lengih. 
Made is 8" s I 1/2" \ 5/,s2" [hick. Pre 
slotted brass guard is t" kin); .W wide 
and 1,'A" thick. Our Alamo Howie kil 
includes the hhulr pre slotted guard, 
brass handle pins and handle material 

SSH175 Blade only 28.<H 

SS475K Kit comnlew; J8.95 



Is" overall with l l" hiadi' lliilhiw ^rinimi From 
3 lt»" stin3L llandti- di-siani'd fur ease in balaiiiL' 
and handling HrLssdiiiihle ^tilard is 5 lis X 1X4 

SS935 liiithai'li B«»ie M,-n 

t:l")ts Diinhli' Brass thianl ft.iO 

RENAISSANCE DAUGKR 



Unusual shape anil 'heart' ctu uui makt- this 
a uniigui' anil spmai knifr. 6 I 4" overall wait 

1 </.|"h(adi' I.B" irikk 



SSIh" gfiiaissame llagRer . 
ItTTIII OPENEtt 



"I M- 



Easy ;md t|uiL'k to make, edges are sharp for quick, 
easy usi-. Make several In give as rtllts K 1 2" 
iivt- rail wiih h I h" hlade. ~ H" wide. I lo" thick. 
SS2I11 better llpener 

SFORTSHAM 



A graeena and useful aildiiiou iii tin- sportsman s 
knife lolleitmii ' v H H overall wilh s I 1" Mule 
grciund Irom I K" sunk 

SSlei Spensman Kin 



a^t^V^ 




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Siii.ill liljuii- uiltt hihiMii.lII itrsivin the iuI imt 
hijde is li^lti ami easy miist' * VH" itviT4ll with 

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MUAIIU'.RS 
Rest magnifiers ivtllable. 

ailjiisiiihle hc^ilhniul fits all 
Easily wi>rn over glasses I 
U'li^s are ^ruiind £ polished | 

.'i i-.::i.-.n- type. Hade in ISA. 



£*.<• 



fti.nJ i .ir^inij, Tonls h fK set 

haitd :i>r-;i'-;| l„llii.l UI^'.llllJ .lint 

slurpwirti fi" iivvraJI Icnjilh 
W$ <^in-til|!TiiuLSH 



MADE IN USA 



STEEL UTTEB AM) 
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Made in I'S.V linesl slirl Sharp giitlut' style I 
for cltsir. deep, impressions. I/lb", y SJ" nr | 
1/S" (slate size desired), 

Imsrst J" of intludes periodl Sii.'li 

Figures (9 |H. 'i retervs tn II $ B.ls 

HIT IM111I S SAVE tJimtiosel SM.'li 



Lr^ltvMASE 



Standard Fanavise with Sofi 

rotation and I BO till. I'erlii I 

angle for any job 2 1.-2" nylon 

jaws withstand heal m j(K) F 

PV.4UI Standard 1'anavise 29.<)i 



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ETCHING 

MACHINES 



ml i. . ■■ your hljides ivith the 
easy u» use iVrstmaliMT or 
^r PiTstJiiyliirer Plus etching 

roachioea Type name or 

draw a pcrsiviaJ dtsijyi ffl the SpeL&d sEentd 
iitLJiiTj.il prnviLhit iheti '^ll-.^ ;ln- easy (fl tise 
Instructkins for pnd'essiiieial rvsvks in -sctimds. 

OSOjptete kil iciilEaiilN every thill i; you :\<-n\ to 
eifli slainli-s,s .util uirhon >ievJ 



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The BEST multi-purpose tool on the market just got better. The new lock 

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LEG ENDARY^JEl BLADES 



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safety, and ease of use. 



P0 Box 23088, 14200 SW 72nd Avenue, Portland, OR 97281 USA 



Ultimate Sword? 



i 



l 



I 



COME TRUE j 



Paul Maffi's long 

knife is a marvel 

of mechanisms 







», 



so 



*r\ 



'He has no trouble making 
dreams come to life." 



The Majica is 42 inches long overall and 
disassembles into six separate parts. 
(Sweetman photo) 



28 I BLADE 



JUNE 98 



Paging 
Mr. Maff i 

.ml VUilli's address am I [ih,. i ii number: 
15 Napier SI.. IHpl, Ill , I M..VIHM: 
22,1,1. Sulnev, Australia telephone (12^52 
imi25(p. II ton have .mi other <j«eslions 
concerning Mut'll. contact Stei u 
SiiiHiir/iT, i>cpi. ill.. I'uii 4. Pomomi 
Park, 11-32181 (W4) 649-5026. Sthwaricr 
ulsu uill lie ill ilk- llhirie Shim \ Interna- 
tional ( nilcn Fair June 12-14 ai ihefuhli 
Gallcria C 'i-iil re in Alluiilii. (ieorgia. 



Paul Anthony Maffi with his dream 
sword in hand. (Sweetntan photo) 



Disassembled, the 42-inch sword fits 
with room to spare in the 28-inch 
carrying case, (Sweetman photo) 



By Steve Schwarzer 



I've been in the knife business nearly 20 years. In 
that course of lime, occasionally someone or 
something very special surfaces. Paul Anthony 
Maffi and his awesome sword qualify on both 
counts. 



I was working away in my shop a few months ago 
when I received an excited phone call from a noted 
collector of fine an. He was ecstatic and wanted to 
come to my shop to show me something extraordi- 
nary. 1 agreed. My friend showed up with one of the 
most remarkable pieces of artwork I've ever seen. 

The collector arrived with Maffi in tow. Paul is a 



JUNE 93 



BLADE/ 29 




Ultimate Sword? 



quiet, very talented young man from Australia. A member of 
the Australian Knifcniakers Guild, he started making swords at 
age 10 in his father's steel fabrication factory. Paul says his inspi- 
ration was the Star Wars movies. He honed his skills making 
bowies and hunters for a few years. In 1992, he began focusing 
on fantasy knives and swords. 

After winning several awards, his work began to take on a 
different focus. He wanted to build the ultimate sword — the 
sword he'd been dreaming of since he was a child. That dream is 
now a reality. 

Named Majica. the sword is 42 inches long. Because of its 
complexity, it's almost impossible to describe. It fits into a 28- 
inch box. A 42-inch sword in a 28-inch, hand-carved leather 
box? That's right! It disassembles into six separate pieces and 
reassembles in 28 seconds. 

Most knives and swords assembled in separate pieces have 
some slop in the mechanisms, but not this one! When assembled, 
it's solid as an iron bar. It also contains some of the most unique 
locking mechanisms I've ever seen. It would take a book to 
describe everything involved in making this unusual piece of art. 
It follows a theme, from the hand-carved leather box to the 
damascus daggers that spring out from the guard at the touch of 
a button. The carved steel guard and bow are incredible. The 
grind lines on the damascus blade flow beautifully into the lines 
of the hilt. The hill is a sheath for another beautiful dagger 
hidden inside. 



At lower right is one of the damascus daggers that springs out of 
the guard at the touch of a button. (Sweetman photo) 



PARAQOp 

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3D /BLADE 



JUNE 98 



THE GUTTING EDGE 



/lC r 'Q 




WW**** 

CMAC 






Jeff Cordon Champio 
Chevrolet Monte Carlo 
antique silver knife. 

7,500 produced 



ont 1997 



FINISHES 





3-1/8' 
HANDLE 



• BLADE 2-1/16" LONG. 1/8" THICK 



BLADE ETCHED WITH SIGNATURE 
AND PRODUCTION NUMBER 



ALSO AVAILABLE: 

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1997 Chevrolet Monte Carlo 
antique-silver knife, 10,000 produced 

Rusty Wallace Miller Lite 1997 Ford 
Thunderbird antique-silver knife. ^ 
5,000 produced 



Dale Jarrett Quality Care 1997 Ford 

Thunderbird antique-silver knife, 

5,000 produced ^&k 

John Force Castrol 1997 Mustang "^^j 
Funny Car antique-silver knife, 
10,000 produced 

COMING SOON: 
Rusty Wallace Elvis "/Miller 
Lite 199B Ford Thunderbird 
antique-silver knife, limited edition 

John Force Elvis 7C.istrol 1998 Mustang 
Funny Car antique-silver knife, limited edition 



I ; 3-DIMENSIONAL 

: CAST METAL GRAPHICS 



These cast metal, limited -edition knives feature 
an etched, stainless steel blade, antique silver 
handle, and are fully functional. 

• Handles measure a full 3-1/8" long, blade 
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• Stainless steel blade is etched with driver's 
signature and the production number of 
the knife. 

• Includes special packaging to display the 
knife either open or closed. 



^!JBiS 



II ATI fl || FOR YOUR LOCAL ARC 
HvI'lUN DISTRIBUTOR, CALL 

PLATINUM SERIES 1-800-41 1 -8404 

Prctdufiidn quants shown may be * or - TOV AH Driver's & SpOfiSOfS N&nes and Of 
LiknesK* Trademarks ,yid Licenss$ u&d wlfc permtssirjn or under bcense Aciirjn 
Perfornance Compannfe. he. ■$ consEanKy impffowg ana updattng &ir protiuas 
Coosaquensiir imag&a may; tfclferlram I'ema actuaty prodwed ©1997 Action 
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CODE B-03 




Ultimate Sward? 



The sword has the appearance of a fine piece of jewelry and is 
a sultan's dream set with semiprecious stones, ll has more mech- 
anisms than Professor Gadget and each works like a bank vault 
door, it would take several days just to admire the sculpted steel 
in the blades, guard and pommel. Paul says he has more dreams 
in the works. I can't wait to sec them. 



Australian Show 
April 18-19 



I K - IV hi IMrlhiiuriK!, Ai 
Bennett (03)93384481 nr 

;i iik iiilu r of the Viislnitiu 
«ili exhibit ul till' slum mi 



hi hi in ii, in 1 1 . Anne 
54 (i74(l. Paul MiifTi i 



I've spent many years admiring the fantastic work of Virgil 
England. Gil Hibben. Paul Jarvis and other makers of fantasy 
swords. I'll have to add one more name to my list of great sword- 
makers — Paul Anthony Maffi. 

Boys, you'd better get busy because there's a new kid on the 
block. He lalks funny, drives on the wrong side of ihe road and 
claims the water goes down the sink in the opposite direction 
from here, but he has no trouble making dreams come to life. 

The author is an ABS master smith, vice president of The Knife mak - 
ers ' Guild and one of the leading makers of mosaic damasctts. Bmx 



The Stroke of Genius 



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32 / BLADE 



JUNE 98 



i 1998 Moteng he. 




THE SWISS CHAMP 

Moteng stocks 
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Order yours today 
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Profile In Sfeef 



WWWJCH 



t INTO THE EDGE 



m&f 



r\ 






EVOLUTION 



Don Fogg 




It was just sparks flying 
all over the place." 



The Kemat offering that served as the 

cover for the August 1993 BLADES was 

a collaboration between Fogg and 

Murad Sayen. (Weyer photo) 



1 By Mike Haskew 



willingness to step out of the 
crowd, to take a risk and assume 
a leadership role can have aston- 
ishing results. For years, Don Fogg 
hasn't simply accepted the challenge, 
he's reveled in it. 

As a knifemaker, bladesmith and tech- 
nical innovator, Fogg has seen the knife 
business continually evolve during the 
past two decades. More importantly, he's 
been a catalyst of that evolution. A 
pioneer among knifemakers using 
computer technology, he said he's been 
Oil the Internet for 10 years. "It's been a 
hobby and fascination for me, and when 
the web started taking shape two or 
three years ago, I saw it as the perfect 
place to reach out and show other people 
in the world what's going on in my back- 
yard. In January I got 53,000 hits (Inter- 
net users accessing his web site) and last 
December 45,000, so we're gaining 
momentum," he noted, 

Fogg said his web site receives many 
inquiries on forging, bladesmithing and 

34/ BLADE 



metalworking. "There are a bunch of us 
out there now," he remarked, "and 
everything on the web with the exception 
of the knives themselves is free. The 
thing I like about the web is the open 
exchange. I've talked to people all over 
the world. It's a fledgling part of our 
vernacular but it hasn't really taken 
shape yet." 

Long known for producing elegant 
damascus steel, Fogg credits his fascina- 

The Fogg File 

Last movie seen: The Usual Suspects 
Last book read: Home by Beth Powning 
Heroes: "The people of peace like Mother 
Teresa and Gandhi, the people with the 
power of truth that changed the world." 
Kni remaking heroes: Jim Schmidt. Jimmy 
Fikes and Mel Pardue 

What's on his front burner: "l"m working on 
a piece for an Italian collector in collabora- 
tion with Jim Kelso," 
What's on his back burner: "Most of my 
orders. 1 don't know if I'm easily distracted, 
but I'm way behind." 



tion with the material for bringing him 
into knifemaking. "It's such a beautiful 
material and so responsive to the 
maker," he observed. "You can get it to 
do almost anything you want and it still 
maintains its organic quality. It's a Cadil- 
lac material." 

Though damascus already can be 
found in a multitude of patterns, the 
possibilities for more are endless. 
"Damascus is so expressive," Don 
explained. "It will draw you right into a 
dramatic pattern and, because it's 
organic, the steel responds, and every 
blow is registered in that steel. If you go 
with that and see it as an asset, you might 
get a wood grain or tree-bark look, or 
even some other version of it. Pattern 
development can drive you crazy. You 
can create something and see a section 
that gives you an idea, and then some- 
thing else that will give you another 
idea." 

Some of Fogg's most memorable 
achievements were on collaborative 
efforts with Murad Sayen during their 
partnership, which was known as Kemal. 

JUNE 98 



"It was one of those moments where we 
met through happenstance. Our lives 
were at the right point and everything 
was go for a partnership," Don reflected. 
"The trick to successful collaboration is 
not to be able to tell where one man 
stopped and the other started. The part- 
nership lasted for U) years, and some- 
times it was absolutely electric. We lived 
a hundred miles apart and would meet 
halfway. He would have a piece finished, 
and I would have the next blade." 

Both Fogg and Sayen knew when 
Kemal had seen its best days. "It just 
had its run," Don explained. "It became 
obvious that it wasn't working and that it 
didn't have the same energy. We could 
have continued it but both of us felt it 
was over. We respected it loo much. 




Currently working with Jim Kelso on 
another collaboration, Fogg combined 
with Kelso on this unusual damascus 
folder several years ago. (Weyer photo) 



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JUNE 98 



BLADE/ 35 



■ 



"Damascus is a 
Cadillac material." 




Don's Zanlums are linertocks® with textured and/or anodized titanium handles. 
Closed lengths: 5 1/4 Inches. (Weyer photo) 



Profile In Sfeef 

We're still very close friends and do a 
piece once in a while. Murad and 1 are 
bonded at the hip. His wife gave birth to 
their son in my house." 

One of the most memorable Kemal 
pieces was the stunning work that 
appeared on the cover of the August 
1993 BLADE®. "That was one of those 
electric moments," remembered Don. 
"The blade was just very creative. We 
had been talking about working with 
lightning, and I had that in my mind. We 
started out on the piece and didn't have 
a plan and just let it go and let it happen. 
At some point it was just sparks flying al! 
over the place. When I got done with the 
blade, I started lugging it around and 
showing it to people whose opinion 1 
respected. Even without the handle, 
people were pushing one another aside 
to look at It 

"I brought the blade to Murad and he 
ruminated on it for at least six months," 
Fogg continued. "What came to mind to 
him was an Indian totem type of piece 
and, once that theme got in his mind, he 
did some research and the design based 
on that. I think that, ultimately, the knife 
will be in a museum and be well taken 
care of. It's a pivotal piece and I couldn't 
have done it on my own." 

Don is now working on some collabo- 
rative ideas with Jim Kelso, with whom 
he's worked on at least one knife project 



in the past. "We're 'playing tunes' 
together," Fogg laughed. "I'll hum some- 
thing and he strums a few bars. It's part 
of that undeniable synergy that can 
happen with two good artists who get 
together and give in to it and try not to 
overpower each other." 

Through the years, Don has been a 
proponent and participant in bladesmilh- 
ing symposiums and hammer- ins across 
the country. He was in the process of 
attending the most recent rendition of 
the Alabama Forge Council Bladesmith- 

Don Fogg 

Dept. BL. 40 Alma Rd. 
Jasper. AL 35501-8813 
(205)483-0832 

ti mill in c Contact maker for into 
Slump 24k-i:uid cherry blossom 
Features A wide ;irray of fixed hUides — 
including; swords — and folders, mosl in 
daniascus: exotic handle materials; also 
uwks in titanium: anodizes 

ing Symposium, which had rather 
humble beginnings in Jim Batson's back- 
yard and was observing its 10th renewal 
as BLADE went to press. Last June, he 
visited Rick Dunkerley's home in 
Montana and participated in a hammer- 
in with Dunkerley, Barry Gallagher and 
Shane Taylor, making an indelible 
imprint on every maker he met. 
In fact, Fogg has a habit of impressing 



people, both as an outstanding knife- 
maker and a fine gentleman as well. 
"Don's one of the most creative human 
beings on the planet," notes fellow ABS 
master smith Steve Schwarzer, who also 
happens to be vice president of The 
Knifemakers' Guild, "What's more, he's 
just one heckuva a good guy." Added 
Gallagher: "Don has so much class and 
knowledge, and has changed my life and 
my whole thought process on how I 
approach knifemaking." Fogg's also won 
many knifemaking awards, the most 
recent being the 1997 B.R. Hughes 
Award for the best knife submitted for 
ABS master smith review al last vear's 
Blade Show, and the 1997 BLADHhand- 
made rM Award for best handmade art 
knife. 

In October, Don will leach swordmak- 
ing at a symposium held at the J.C. 
Campbell Folk School in Brasslown, 
North Carolina. "This will be the second 
year I've been there," he said. "It's a 
wonderful blacksmithing facility set up 
by Francis Whttaker. It's hard to find a 
place with 14 furnaces, and we had them 
all smoking last year." 

Through all his knifemaking endeavors, 
Fogg has been willing to lead the way. 
Much of his artistry is recognizable on 
sight. As he's said, when the piece is right, 
it's almost impossible to put a maker's 
mark on it. If it's right, you don'l want to 
put anything on it other than what it is. 
The mark is in the piece itself. iB^de 



36 / BLADE 



JUNE 98 



Last Time In 





the 29th International 



Knifemakers Guild Show 



July 10, 11, 12, 1998 



RIVIERA HOTEL &? CASINO 

Convention Hall — 2901 Las Vegas Blvd. South 

• Hunting • Bowies • Folding • Sporting • Miniatures • Art • Swords • Daggers 



Photo by 
Weyer international 




Maker: HOWARD RO0SIM5 
Engraver MICHAEL DUSBEfl 



Maher; ED LAHY 

Damascus Bar: ntCri SMOLEti 

Scrimshaw: LlrlDA HAY KAR5T 




The Knifemakers Guild 5how is recognized as the 
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where more than 250 members display and offer 
for sale handcrafted knives of the finest quality. 



For special Guild Motel arrangements, contact The Riviera Hotel & Casino, 1-800-634-6753. 
Please ash for the Knifemakers Guild Room Rate of $79 single or double. Official airlines 
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Phone; 602-878-3064 




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Knife Talk 




BEWARE 

OE THE MEDICINE MAN 




Sharing knife knowledge bodes well for all 



The brightly colored medicine wagon 
rolled down Main Street, dust rising 
from its wheels as the townsfolk 
gathered for the arrival of the Pony 
Express and news from the rest of the 
world. The medicine man climbed up and 
stood on the back of the wagon and began 
his pitch. He offered, for the mere price of 
a week's wages, a new "secret potion" 
that was a 2,000-year-old Chinese remedy. 
It would cure cancer, syphilis, rheuma- 




There are few more noble goals In the world of knives than 
sharing knowledge, as Wayne Goddard (left) does here 
while Instructing at an Alabama Forge Council Symposium. 

38 / BLADE 



■ By Ed Fowler 
ABS master smith 



tism, impotence and attract women like 
flies, he claimed. An articulate speaker, 
he attracted the townsfolk and, for the 
afflicted, inspired new hope. 

As the people wasted their hard- 
earned money buying bottle after bottle, 
the old town doctor stood at the back of 
the crowd. He sadly shook his 
head while he watched them, 
many patients of his, lay out 
cash money for the worthless 
cure, the same people who 
hadn't had the means to pay 
what they had owed him for 
years. With mixed feelings he 
watched as they chased hope- 
less dreams. With great desire 
he wished some such cure 
existed as it would have saved 
the lives of many of his former 
patients whose company he 
greatly missed. 

The town marshal stood 
next to him as the event tran- 
spired. The aged doctor spoke 
of the travesty that they were 
witnessing, suggesting that the 
charlatan should be run out of 
town. He noticed that the 
marshal was rubbing his shoul- 
der, a shoulder that had given 
the lawman some pain since 
the big bar fight years ago. The 
look in the marshal's eyes told 
the doctor that his suggestion 
fell on deaf ears, ears which 
would soon turn red with the 
aftereffects of the secret 
potion. 

While you might smile 
when you hear of such events, 
the cancer that supports the 



charlatan still eats on mankind today. This 
seemingly trivial event is more malignant 
than it appears on the surface, for by its 
very nature the survival of man is threat- 
ened. He who sells his product on the 
basis of "secrets" either sells false dreams 
or is the keeper of a secret that, should it 
have any real benefit, robs all men of 
better times solely for his own gain. 

The medicine man illusion survives in 
all worlds, and the world of knives is no 
exception. 

"The medicine man 

illusion survives in 

all worlds." 

I could very easily take a torch, play it 
on a blade, and create a temper line on 
the surface of a specialized steel and claim 
a new "secret" process that few could 
duplicate, and make great claims of its 
quality. The knives would sell without a 
doubt but my method would only add a 
little smoke, impairing everyone's vision 
of a better blade, for should I share my 
knowledge, another maker could very 
easily advance my discovery to even 
greater heights and all would benefit. 
Whenever knowledge is shared it's also 
gained, as information shared grows 
beyond the vision of any single individual. 
The danger of competition emphasizing 
secrets or exclusive materials lies in the 
fact that it takes most from those who can 
ill afford the loss and preys on a great 
weakness of man, greed — humanity's 
greatest threat to survival. 

That people depend upon each other, 
even in these "modern times," is revealed 
when one transformer can cause an elec- 
trical outage involving communities 
hundreds of miles away. Should one 
man's "secret steel" or knowledge gained 

JUNE 98 



from his "secrets" lead to the prevention 
of hardship, it's paramount to all men 
that it be shared. 

Ultimate Survival 

One day. man as a species may face the 
ultimate test of survival, either due to the 
whims of nature or man himself. Should 
this occur, you can bet that the "medi- 
cine man" will be out for his own inter- 
ests and manifest little compassion for 
those who fall prey to his illusion. 
Mankind will know no comfort from 
him. Man's only chance for survival lays 
in the ability to develop an altruistic 
sense of community wherein humanity, 
love and quality survival for all is the 
goal. 

The world of knives is but a small 
pond in the immense waters of life. Still, 
leading by example in the world of 
knives can be a road map for others to 
follow. Should knife enthusiasts of all 
stripes make a difference in but a small 
percentage of the rest of man, they will 
have contributed well. 

Do J have secrets? Yes. thousands of 
them. Every time I make a knife, a new 
finite method makes itself known to me, 
I don't keep these secrets willingly. Only 
by their nature do they not become 
known. They're the secrets that come to 
mind during the thousands of solitary 
hours making knives — some of conse- 
quence, many insignificant when consid- 
ered alone. "A little more pressure here, 
blend the edge to tip this way, a change 
in sequence, a different hold or stroke 
with a hammer," the list goes on and the 
mode of discovery is well known to all 
knifemakers, I would offer all these 
"secrets" willingly to those who are 
interested, but for want of words and 
lime cannot find a means of sharing 
them. Were I to write of each and every 
one, most readers certainly would be 
bored. Still, should anyone ask. he won't 
be denied. Fortunately, many knifemak- 
ers share this philosophy. 

All blade enthusiasts swim the same 
waters. Those who buy the knives of the 
"medicine man" surely won't be inter- 
ested in my blades. Nor do I seek to be 
associated with them, for they support 
the ideals for which I have nothing but 
disdain. All knifemakers compete by 
virtue of craftsmanship, design and 
desire. My greatest competition is with 
myself. 

When you share time and knowledge 
honestly with those who share your 
vision, you know good times with 
friends— and, I hope, influence the 
future nature of man toward a sense of 
community. The future will be shared by 
my friends the coyote and the rattler, 
proven survivors, as will the breed of 
man who's developed the skills of altru- 
ism and the hunter to carry on the 
species. Homo Sapiens, hopefully to a 
more perfect civilization. Budx. 




Ad flipped at advertiser's request. 



Ed Fowler says, "If I had known how 
good Paragon furnaces are, I would 
have bought one years before I did." 



If anyone knows 
the capabilities of 
blade steels, it is Ed 
Fowler. He testa end 
lessly. He bends 
blades in a vice. He 
test-cuts hundreds 
of feet of hemp rope. 

His Paragon fur- 
nace is an integral 
part of his testing. If 
the blade edge chips 
when flexed, he 
changes the heat 
treating. 

Ed Fowler can ex- 
periment with heat 
treating and blade 
testing whenever he wants with his 
Paragon furnace. "A lot of blade heat 
treatments can't be done without a 
Paragon," says Ed. 

"My Paragon furnace has always 
provided the dependability I can count 
on to support my commitment to seek 
and provide my customers the best 
functional knife possible," says Ed. 
"Paragon offered me no financial 
rewards or free equipment for this en- 
dorsement. I recommend Paragon fur- 
naces only because they make an 
excellent, reliable product." 

Paragon furnaces are equipped with 
the electronic DTC 800 controller— the 
most accurate controller Paragon has 
offered. The temperature sensor, or 
thermocouple, is hermetically sealed in 
a metal sheath for long life and greater 
accuracy. 

Paragon furnaces are insulated 
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service. The base dissipates the heat 
under the furnace so no extra stand is 
needed. The heating elements are 
mounted in dropped, recessed brick 
grooves for easy maintenance and long 
life. Elements are simple to replace be- 
cause they are exposed rather than em- 
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door is opened. 

The furnace door 
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The KM -series 
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Ed Fowler uses knives everyday as a working cowtxiy lengths: the 14 <\fy 
on his Wyoming ranch. long 120 volt KM- 

14D, the 24" long 
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volt KM-36D. (All three models are 5 
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The KM-14D is $1010; the KM-24D 
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E-mail: Paragonlnd@worldnet.att.net 



JUNE 98 



BLADE / 39 



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The next 1 pieces feature 
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15. Green bone Retail $92 

16. Yellow bone Retail $92 

17. Red bone Retail $92 

18. Purple Swirl Retail $86 

19. Peacock Leaf Retail $86 

20. Abalone Swirl Retail $86 

21. Imitation Ivory Retail $86 

22. Genuine Stag Retail $106 




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— Buster Warenski 







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Julie and Buster Warenski (Wright photo) 
have taken on soma of knifemaking's 
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dagger features Julie's engraving and 
diamond and ruby inlay. Total diamond 
weight: 5 carats. (Weyer photo) 



Husband-and-wife knife 

teams live, eat and 

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42 / 8LADE 



JUNE 98 



By Mike Haskew 



Celebrating a wedding anniversary is 
significant for any married couple, 
but those who work together in 
handmade knives can look to a few other 
momentous events as well. Chances are 
they alt remember the first knife they 
collaborated on together or the first show 
they attended as husband/maker and 
wife/embellisher. 

Chuck and Belle 

"I like working with him because we both 
have a chance to be creative," commented 
Belle Ochs, who's been doing scrimshaw 
on her husband Chuck's knives for more 
than 15 years. "We're not having to 
answer to anybody else, and it's nice to 
stay home together all day and do what 
you like doing. Other people go home at 
the end of the day and they're too tired to 
even spend time with one another." 

From time to time. Chuck and Belle 

"Being in dose 

quarters can generate 

as much friction as a 

buffing wheel." 

discuss a piece from start to finish, decid- 
ing on design and handle material. On 
other knives, they trust one another. 
"'Once in a while he'll give me an idea or 
tell me the direction or which side of the 
knife the scrim would look better on." 
said Belle, "but he'll generally leave the 
artistic part up to me. And I always tell 
him how nice and balanced his knives are. 
but don't make design comments." 

Working as a couple brings out the best 
in each artist. Chuck thanks Belle for the 
improvement of a recent project. "I had 
roughed out a piece of stag for the knife, 
and Belle said. "No. no. no. That's not 
gonna do,' I had to gel another piece, and 
to her credit it turned out beautiful." 

Understandably, being in close quarters 
can sometimes generate nearly as much 
friction as a good buffing wheel. "You do 
gel irritable with one another, especially if 
you hive deadlines to meet." said Belle. 
"What I do is the last thing done on the 
knife, and I'm continually reminding 
Chucl- 'if I he date something is due." 

"I'm ;. il picky about what I perceive 
that the customer wants," Chuck 
remarked, and so is Belle about what 
she's 1 1 ung to do. Occasionally, we have a 
disag: . ment and it's not good lor your 
faniib life if you say. 'That looks terrible. 
You need lo tan over." I've never said 
that to her, I'm not stupid." 

Clin* and Trenu 

For 20 years. Cliff and Trena Polk have 
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JUNE 98 



BLADE/ 43 



Coupled fit Cutlery 




Trena finds active participation in the 
business a great benefit. "In 1W0. Cliff 
retired from the fire department in Ft. 
Smith (Arkansas) and we're getting back 
into shows now." she observed. "It does 
keep us logether a lot. and it's exciting to 
he involved and not just a wife tagging 
along," 

Trena's artistry with the stylus contin- 
ues to amaze Cliff. "When you buff ivory, 
you can sometimes gel a mark in it that 
looks like a blemish hut it isn't. It doesn't 
hurt the quality of the ivory and she can 
make it look right at home in whatever 
scene she scrims, even if it wasn't in the 
original plan," Cliff smiled. 

He and Trena have made knives as gifts 
for Presidents Ronald Reagan and 
George Bush. "We gave Reagan a knife 
with an engraved eagle holding a ribbon 
that said The Right To Keep And Bear 
Arms,"* recalled Trena. 

Jim and Joyce 

The team approach of Jim and Joyce 
Minnick has resulted in finished knives 
that capture the couple's individual 
personalities. "I'll come up with a concept 
and Joyce, with her artistic ability, will 
add and take away. She'll decide what she 
wants to carve or engrave," explained 
Jim. "If I'm designing a knife, even if it's 
not going to be embellished, she's still 
involved in deciding the design or maybe 
what damaseus steel to use. We have 
"board meetings' to decide what to make 
for a particular show." 

Jim and Joyce seem to believe that 
their knife-team match is made in heaven. 
"The absolute truth is that there is no 
negative side," Joyce said. "We've 
enjoyed this from the onset, and we're 
still learning, growing and evolving into 
new things. We're excited about carving 
right now and embellishing knives with 
diamonds and doing colored titanium." 



Buster und Julie 

In 1986, a young woman attended an 
engraving class in Richfield. Utah. Even- 
tually, she married the teacher. Since 
then. Buster (the teacher) and Julie (the 
student) Warenski have collaborated on 
some dazzling pieces. 

Buster particularly remembers a Guild 
Show a few years back. "We won the Best 
Collaboration Award," he said. "Every- 
thing had worked right on that piece and 
to be recognized like that was realty great. 
It's wonderful to share the spotlight and 
share our work. Either one of us apart 
from the other could not produce what we 
produce together." 

Gold inlay and arabesque scrollwork 
are Julie's favorite knife accents. "We can 
share ideas and kind of inspire each 
other." she commented. "I look at knives 
differently than Buster does — for the 
engraving surface. At limes I've asked 
him to design something and told him 
what I wanted." 

"It's exciting to be 
involved, not just a 
wife tagging along." 

— Trena Polk 

This year the Warenskis are celebrating 
25 years in knives, and work has begun on 
the fourth knife in their Legacy Series. 
The first three in this one-of-a-kind series 
included the solid-gold King Tut Dagger, 
the emerald-and-diamond-encrusted Gem 
of the Orient, and the ruby-and-diamond- 
laden Fire and lee. The fourth Legacy 
knife will incorporate gold, platinum and 
diamonds. 

"One of the positive aspects of working 
together is that I can get a piece 
completed and she cart work on it unas- 



sembled," Busier related. "If she wants a 
certain style of piece adjacent to it, she 
can tell me and we can work with our 
joint ideas. It helps that we haven't had a 
cross word in the 1 1 years we've been 
married. We interact all day long and it 
doesn't slop when the work is over. Julie 
is my best friend, as well as my partner 
and wife." 

RJ. and Kenee 

A 2-year-old demands attention, and R.J. 
and Renee McDonald arc balancing 
family life with work these days. "Lately, 
if 1 get to work on a piece, it's after baby 
Jake is asleep," said Renee. "He's a curi- 
ous one and we don't allow him near our 
work area since there are a lot of sharp 
things there," 

R.J. has made knives for nine years and 
Renee has scri mined for seven. "Getting 
Renee involved wasn't an accident," R.J. 
remarked. "I was spending a lot of quality 
time in the garage. She was always artistic 
and 1 was spending too much lime away 
from her. We'd only he a door away but 
the point is thai we didn't see each other. 
She took right to embellishing knives and 
now she's as much a part of it as I am." 

The McDonalds enjoy the travel oppor- 
tunities provided by attending shows. 
"We've made vacations out of the shows 
we've attended," recalled Renee. "Last 
year we went to the Guild Show and saw 
Hoover Dam. All the knifemakers and 
wives have become extended family, and 
we like to see them every year. They've 
seen us grow from single to married to 
having children. They say they like watch- 
ing us. We're the new ones and eventually 
we'll be old-timers. It's just a good group 
of people." 

Fur the addresses of the knives and knife 
"teams" in this story, see "Where To Get 
'Em " tin page 95. uTTnT 



44 /BLADE 



JUNE 98 




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June 98 



BLADE /45 



'■Knifemaker Showcase" spotlights the photographs of knives sent by any and all custom knifemakers to BLADE* for filing in the Knifemakers Archive. 

The Knifemakers Archive is the most complete collection of knifemakers' knives and information in the world. If you are a custom knifemaker and have 

not sent us a photo {the better quality the photo, the better chance it has of getting in the magazine), write in care of: BLADE, c/o Krause Publications, 

700 E. State, lola, Wl 54990. Please include a close-up mug shot of yourself with your knife picture. 



'Wtandi 'THe^eiu 




"I loved the idea of forging," recalls Mardi Meshejian, "so 
one day I built a fire in my backyard and made a sword 
using a coil spring from my Volkswagen Beetle." Meshejian 
is schooled in jewelry making but chose to become a knife- 
maker after enrolling in classes at the Bill Moran School Of 
Bladesmithing in 1994. A member of the American Blades- 
mith Society, he exhibits at four shows yearly and hopes to 
become a full-time maker. Meshejian specializes in fantasy 

and art knives. His 28 1/2- 
inch sword with a sheep 
horn handle, damascus 
blade and copper and silver 
fittings lists for $3,500. His 
address: Dept. BL, 33 Elm 
Dr., East Northport, NY 
1731 (516) 757-4541. 
I Weyer photo) 



?)(&& Petftoa 




A home-schooled, 16-year-old knifemaker, Matthias 

McKann has been making knives for five years. "I 

learned the craft from knifemaker Emil Morgan, 

who I came in contact with through a picture in The 

Gun Digest Book Of Knives ," 

McKann remembers. "One of his 

knives was pictured with his name 

and town inscribed on the blade." 

McKann contacted Morgan and 

worked with him for two years 

before becoming independent of 

his guidance, McKann says. "Until 

now I've been making knives from 

bar stock and Bob Engnath blades 

for friends," he relates. "I recently 

decided to go full time and reveal myself and my 

story." The hunter (right) sports a 440-C blade and a 

composite stag, olive burl and ebony handle. His list 

price: $300. His address: Dept. BL, 27370 Winding 

Way. Malibu, CA 90265 (310) 589-5801. 

46 / BLADE 



Beauty and utility are | 

essential ingredients 

knives, Dick Patton 

says. He began 

making knives in his 

garage in North 

Carolina with a 

small coal forge, a 

few basic tools and a 

lifelong passion for 

knives. He moved to 

California in 1989, 

where his line of 

custom knives expanded. "I was commissioned to do knives for the movies 

Last Of The Mohicans and The Last OfTheDogmen," he says. Patton and 

his son Rob make hunting, skinning, utility, folding, bowie and kitchen 

knives using 440-C, ATS-34, O-l. D-2, A-2 and damascus steel. Their bird 

and trout knife features a 3 3/4-inch. ATS-34 blade and a manzanita burt 

handle. Their list price for a similar piece: $200. Dick's address: Dept, BL, 

206F W. 38th St.. Garden City. TD 83714 (208) 395-08%. (Gallagher photo) 




JUNE 98 



/4.^. ^6Vtd<U€ 



"My brother and [ were raised on 
a farm and made knives from 
cross-cut saw blades using hand- 
turned grinding stones," A.D. 
Rardon reports. A Knifemakers' 
Guild member since 1984, 
Rardon was employed for 33 
years as a sheet metal worker/ 
TWA mechanic, "I was exposed 
to all kinds of metal," he says. "My favorite 
part of the job was designing and making 
tools." Rardon says he spends his time 
making knives and friends. Though he's 
experimented with making a variety of knife 
patterns, multi-blade folders and miniatures 
are his favorite and most challenging 
conquests. "Miniatures take twice as long // 
everything goes right," he notes. Rardon 
enjoys forging his own cable damascus and 
using ATS-34 and 440-C blade steels. Shell and stag are his 
preferred handle materials. For his 1 1/8-inch miniatures with 
ivory and pearl handles and 440-C blades, his list price is 
$200 per blade, per knife. His address: Dept. BL, 1589 S.E. 
Price Dr., Polo, MO 64671 (816) 354-2330. (Weyer photo) 




*Ke& THwi&teef 




"The working of hot iron is the most rewarding part of knifemaking 
for me," says Ken Markley. "I thoroughly enjoy hand forging." 
Becoming interested in knives in the mid-1980s while reading an 
issue of BLADE Magazine®, Markley began biacksmi thing soon 
after and has been a member of the Blacksmith Association of 

Missouri since 1988. He makes his own damascus 

and says he achieves the best performance for his 

designs from using 5160, 52100, 1095, L-6 and O-l 

steels. His latest achievement was becoming an 

ABS journeyman smith. The 

"Fighter" model employs a 

1095 blade, a stag handle and 

a stainless steel bolster. His 

list price: $225. His address: 

Dept. BL, 7651 Cabin Creek 

Ln., Sparta, IL 62286 (618) 

443-5284. (Gallagher photo) 




Dennis Friedly walked into Harvey Draper's knife shop 
more than 25 years ago for an eye-opening introduction 
into handmade knifemaking. "With an art background, 
I immediately took to what Draper was doing-produc- 
ing a working knife, but one with beauty, elegance and 
top-notch craftsmanship," he says. Influenced by knife- 
makers like Buster Warenski and Gil Hibben, Friedly's 
knifemaking has evolved. "I strive for quality with my pieces which, whether 
hunters, fighters or daggers, favor the art knife." He prefers natural handle 
materials and top stainless or damascus steels. His hunting knives (above) sport 
ATS-34 blades, 416 stainless steel bolsters engraved by Bruce Shaw and ivory 
handles scrim med by Mary Mueller. His list prices: $1,425-$1,450. His address: 
Dept. BL. 12 Cottontail Ln., Cody, WY 82414 (307) 527-6811. (Weyer photo) 



JUNE 98 



BLADE / 47 



By Wayne Goddard 



The $50 Knife Shop 

How To Hot Shape The Blade 



I woke up the other morning wonder- 
ing if I was doing the "right thing" 
with my current series. "The $50 
Knife Shop." After all, it's a hi-tech 
world with new materials, methods and 
machinery appearing almost every day. 
The way that factory and handmade 
knives are made is continually changing. 
Most of the rules don't stay the same for 
very long. 

Forging is one part of knifemaking 
that hasn't changed for thousands of 
years. It may be the low-tech end of 
blade making but it has one big advan- 
tage in the simplicity of tools required. 
The necessities are few: a fire to heat the 
steel, some muscles to swing a hammer 
and an anvil where the steel and hammer 
get acquainted. These thoughts got me 
right back to ihe $5(1 knife shop project 
because I believe that "simple" is a 
good way to get started. 

The first smiths laid the founda- 
tion for the machine age and that 
makes forging the beginning of all 
technology. Forging is not only the 
most basic metalworking process 
but a lot of bladesmiths find it's 
great fun to heat a piece of steel, 
take hammer in hand and coax the 
orange- hot steel bar into a new and 
exciting object. 



It's constructed easily from any half- 
inch -diameter round bar stock. Coil 
spring material or a handle for a bumper 
jack will hold up better than mild steel. 
{See page 48 of the January BLADE® 
for a picture of a spring fuller made from 
the jack handle/tire iron. The spring 
fuller is the object atop the makeshift 
anvil.) It's held in position by a 1-inch- 
square shank that fits the hardie hole in 
the anvil. The one on page 48 of the 
January til. ADC is made from the 
handle of a bumper jack. The center 
section is forged down to ahout I /4-inch 
thick and then heated and bent into the 
shape shown. While there's still some 
heal in the bottom member, arc weld a 
square shank onto it to fit the hardie 
hole in your anvil. (Note: Arc welding 
steel with a high carbon content when 




The Tang Step- Down 



To make a clip blade, cut the blade blank off at an angle 
similar to A. Cut it with an abrasive saw, bandsaw or hot 
cutter. The clip (B) and belly shape (C) form almost 
automatically as you forge the bevel. The American 



The last lesson in "The $50 Knife Bladesmith Society doesn't allow this method of blade 



shaping for the test blades of journeyman or master 
smith applicants. Official test blades must be forged to 
shape from the bar stock. 



Shop" ended as the coil spring 
material was being flattened by 
forging. When the flat section is 4 
1/2 inches long and 3/1 6-inch thick, 
draw down the tang area to 3/8-inch 
wide. To do this, hold the area 
where you want the lang to start 
over the edge of the anvil. The 
hammer blow should be directly 
over the anvil's edge. That creates a 
"step down" where the blade meets 
the tang. By turning the blade ISO 
degrees, the step-down on the other 
side can be forged in with careful 
hammer blows. To make a semi-skinner or butcher knife shape, cut two 

An easier way to make the lang angles as per AA. The point shape (BB) is then quickly 
step-down is to use a spring fuller, made with an economy of hammer blows. 

46 / BLADE 




not preheated will cause the weld to 
crack out and fail.) If your anvil doesn't 
have a square hole, the spring fuller can 
be held in a vise. 

Once the tang is formed, it's time to 
shape the blade. (Forging to shape is 
covered on pages 30-31 of the November 
■97 BLADE.) Using a hot cutter to shape 
the preform of the point is quicker. 
That's the way many old-lime smiths did 
it. and probably for good reason. Much 
of the steel available at the time couldn't 
he pointed up in thin sections without 
coming apart. 1 found the following in 
the 1876 book, American Blacksmith- 
ing, Toolsmiths and Steelworkem 
Manual, by John Gust a f Hoist rom and 
Henry I. Hoi ford: "Never try to forge the 
point of the knife, but cut it to shape 
with a chisel." The book doesn't say why. 



Knife Shop Feedback 
I'm starting to get some good feed- 
back from those who are applying 
the lessons presented so far in "The 
$50 Knife Shop." One "feedback" 
came in a phone conversation with a 
maker who was successfully welding 
small folder-sized damascus billets in 
a one-brick forge. (See "How To 
Make The World's Smallest Forge" 
in the January BLADE.) I can't give 
him proper credit because the paper 
monster that lives under my desk ate 
the sticky-note with his name on it. 
He used a "Turbo Torch" from 
Granger with Mapp gas for fuel. His 
only complaint was that the borax 
used for flux would eat up the brick. 
A remedy that may help is to 
coat the bottom of the heat chamber 
with a layer of fire clay. Parker 
brand Furnace and Retort Cement 
is a 3.000" F product that works well 
for such an application. Set up the 
brick forge so that the back is 
slightly higher than the opening in 
the front and the excess molten flux 
will run out. II and when the brick 
cracks, bind it up with some iron or 
copper wire. BlaBe 

JUNE 98 




Joe Malloy's Bra Knife fits in a sheath that 
in turn clips onto a woman's brassiere at 
the cleavage or wherever the woman 
wants to clip It. "She can then draw the 
knife from under her shirt or blouse, " 
Malloy explained. "My sister gave me the 
idea. She helped me test It and wore the 
original, and said It works well. " The 
sheath's back is a smooth suede so as to 
not irritate the wearer's skin. The inside of 
the sheath is lined with Kydex and the 
front features green (shown) or white ray- 
skin overlay. The knife Is 4 inches long 
overall and has an A TS-34 blade and 
abalone handle. A gold chain is optional 
to wear the outfit around the neck. 
Malloy's list price for the sheath and 
knife: $125. For more information contact 
Joe Malloy, Depi. BL. POB 156, Freeland, 
PA 18224(717)636-2781. (Weyer photo) 



10th Blades mithing 
Symposium March 27-29 

H'Shc 10th Annual Bladesmithing 
Symposium & Knife Show will he March 
27-29 at the Tannehill Ironworks west of 
Bessemer. Alabama. 

Sponsored hy ihe Alabama Forge 
Council, Ihe symposium will feature 
bladesmithing and other knife seminars 
by Alfred Pendray. Steve Schwarzer, Mel 
Pardue, Don Fogg and many others. 

The symposium fee is $100 per 
person. For more information contact 
Barbara Batson, Depl. BL, 11 Fox Hills, 
Douglas, GA 31535 (912) 383-6776. 



BLADE Classified Ads 
Are Now Worldwide 

'rause's new eollecltt.net offers the 

Lglobe's largest classified World 
Wide Web site for collectors and hobby- 
ists, including knife enthusiasts. 

The new Internet site — ihe full 
address of which is www.collectit.net — 
includes the classified ads from most of 
Krause's 34 periodicals, including 
BLADE®. It's important to note that 
the BLADE classified ads won't appear 
on the web site until after subscribers 
have received their BLADE issues, thus 
guaranteeing subscribers first shot at the 
ads. Hence, the ads reach not only 
BLADE readers but the scores of people 
who access the collectit.nel web page. 

The result could be that BLADE 
classifieds will provide record sales and 
that knives may grow in popularity by 
leaps and bounds worldwide. 

Collcetit.net is separate from 
Krause's already active corporate site 
www.krause.com but will be linked to 
the corporate site for easy access. The 
new site's .net suffix was chosen to stress 
thai it's a network infrastructure 
provider as opposed to a 
commercial/business site. 

"We spent two years analyzing the 
market," said Don Johnson, Krause vice 
president of sales and marketing and one 
of the leaders of the collectit.nel project. 
"Seeing that Ihe classifieds have gener- 
ated such interest, the next logical step 
was to create a classifieds site for all of 
our hobby fields. We're confident that 
colleclil.net will provide a state-of-lhe- 
art information and product site thai will 
become known as the place to buy and 
sell collectibles and hobby-related 
items." 

Collectit.nel opened on March 2. For 
more information contact BLADE 
Magazine, 700 E. Slate St., Iola, WI 
54990 (715) 445-2214 or e-mail 
blade@krausc.com. 



Trabbic Passes On 

| Knifemaker Roland "Ron" W. Trab- 
bic of Toledo, Ohio, passed away on Jan. 
31. An avid outdoorsman, Trabbic made 
fixed blades and traditional folders, and 
sold his first knife in 1973. 



JUNE 98 



BLADE / 49 




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SOG 



The pieces with the familiar 
acronym remain some of the 
Vietnam War's most coveted knives 



' By Bernard Levine 



In the history of the U.S. military, most 
issue knives were designed for particu- 
lar Functions, some were intended for 
specialized units and a few were created 
for specific missions or operations. An 
unusual example of the latter type was the 
SOG knife. This piece is now well known 
to collectors, though its existence was 
secret at the time of its original issue. 

SOG was an acronym for the Studies 
and Observation Group, On Jan. 24, 1964, 
President Lyndon Johnson approved 
OPLAN 34A, authorizing creation of the 
intelligence gathering group. The primary 
mission of SOG was to provide undeni- 
able proof of NVA (North Vietnamese 



was further designated a Joint Unconven- 
tional Warfare Task Force that might 
draw upon all branches of the U.S. armed 
forces, as well as civilian agencies, for 
operations in the field, SOG was to be the 
largest clandestine unit since the OSS 
(Office of Strategic Services) of World 
War II. 

Baker's Blade 

The SOG knife was designed specifically 
for the 5th Special Forces Group 
(Airborne) operating within the Stud- 
ies and Observation Group. The knife 
was designed by Conrad B. (Ben) 
Baker of CISO (the Counter-Insur- 
gency Support Office). Baker had 




The etched inscription of the Airborne 
and Special Forces mottoes and the 
recipient's name grace this presentation 
model with a 6-inch, plum-colored blade. 

Army) aggression in the region, particu- 
larly in South Vietnam. Johnson would 
use this evidence to muster political 
support for the war effort, both at home 
and abroad. 

SOG was a joint operation among the 
Republic of Vietnam Special Forces, 
MACV (U.S. Military Assistance 
Command. Vietnam) and the civilian CIA 
(Central Intelligence Agency). The initial 
plan was for the South Vietnamese to 
supply the intelligence gathering element, 
for MACV to supply instructors, training 
sites and equipment, and for the CIA to 
provide funds and training assistance. In 
addition to intelligence gathering, SOG 



been appointed deputy chief of 
CISO in June 1963. He worked with 
Army Special Forces personnel in 
refining and testing the knife's design. 
Baker recounted this story in an article he 
wrote in the Fall 1991 issue of the now- 
defunct Fighting Knives magazine. 

Baker worked up the design of the 
SOG blade from 1/4-inch steel and carved 
prototype handles from pieces of broom- 
stick. The principal tester of the proto- 
types was retired Master Sgt. Ross Bailey. 
Baker's inspiration for using stacked- 
leather-washer handles on the SOG 
knives was his experience with a Marble's 
skinning blade that had served him well 
for many years. 

Much of the practical field testing was 
done on dead hogs in a commercial 
slaughterhouse. This experience 
prompted the addition of finger grooves 




52 / BLADE 



JUNE 98 



lo the handles. It also inspired the 
combination of a long, finger-grooved 
ricasso with a contoured double guard. 
These features allowed a firm grasp on 
the knife when withdrawing the blade 
after a deep stab. 

The First SOGs 

The final specification was approved by 
SOG/Sth Group on June 6, 1964. CISO 
sent drawings to contractors in Japan for 
prototypes to be made. Japan Sword 
Co.'s prototypes were rejected due to 
poor steel quality, though the company 
later made commercial versions of the 
knife. 

Yogi Shokai was the Japanese manu- 
facturer selected to produce the SOG 
knives. Baker worked with Kei Tanaka, 
vice president of Shokai, supervising the 
production phase. The first knives 
ordered were 1,300 of the 7-inch, biued- 
blade Recon models (Recon was one of 
SOG's five operational branches). Biade 
steel was tested by Nichimen Corp. in 
Japan. Poor steel was the only considera- 
tion for rejecting a knife. That's why 
there's considerable variation in SOG 
guards, ricassos, spine grinds and so on. 
The steel selected was SKS-3. 

6-Inch Blades 

The first 6-inch-blade, SOG-type knives 
were ordered in October 1966. The order 
was for 1,200 sterile blades with black 
sheaths and whetstones at $8.40 each. 
Some of the knives were plated and 
engraved later for presentation purposes. 
Though usually referred to as a SOG 
knife, the 6-inch version was strictly a 5th 
Special Forces piece not procured 
through SOG. 



) 



A second batch of 6-inch knives was 
ordered in March 1967. They were serial 
numbered 1 to 3,700. Their official desig- 
nation was "Knife, indigenous, hunting, 
6", w/Black Sheath and Whetstone." 
Indigenous was a code word that 
referred to sterile (unmarked) items. 
This batch was delivered in November 



Current SOG Knife Values* 

7-inch Recon, unmarked; $3,000 and up 

6-inch Recon, unmarked: $1,200-$ 1,600 

6-inch numbered or presentation, 
marked: $l,3OO-$l,80O 

*from United States Military Knives 
and Bayonets Price Guide by M.W. 
Silvey, Gary Boyd and Frank Trzaska 



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Military Blades 

1967. 

Also in 1967, the 5th Special Forces 
Mess Association ordered 1,700 presen- 
tation knives etched with the Special 
Forces Crest and "5th Special Forces 
Group (Abn.)/ Vietnam." CISO assisted 
in the acquisition of the knives but they 
were paid for by the 5th's Mess Associa- 
tion. The knives were delivered in Janu- 
ary 1968. 

The final batch of SOG-type knives 
was ordered by the CISO in 1972 for 
JCRC (the Joint Casualty Resolution 
Center) in Thailand. The mission of the 
JCRC was to undertake raids, find 
POWs and search for the remains of 
allied personnel throughout Southeast 
Asia. 

These were the only SOG-type 
knives procured through official chan- 
nels during the Vietnam War. Additional 
unrecorded quantities were ordered by 
detachments all over Southeast Asia. 
Some knives might also have been sold 
through post exchanges, though this 
hasn't been confirmed. 

SOG was ended formally on April 30, 
1972. By then, all responsibility for 
reconnaissance and intelligence gather- 
ing had been officially turned over to the 
South Vietnamese government. 

The last original SOG knife was 
presented to Ben Baker on Feb. 1, 1990, 
in a ceremony at the Yogi Shokai plant 
in Japan. It was a sterile version 
inscribed to him. 

Viva La Variants 

Collectors have observed many varia- 
tions of the SOG and 5th S.F. knives. 
The original 7-inch Recon models and 
the first 6-inch knives were unmarked, 
while the second batch of 6-inch pieces 
was serial numbered. The presentation 
models followed. 

The color of blade bluing varied from 
dark blue-black to a shade of plum. The 
colors were the result of temperature 
variations in the bluing process. The 
leather-washer handles were made both 
with and without spacers. The guards of 
the original models were large and 
rounded, and made of brass. Some later 
wartime guards were aluminum or steel. 
Original guards weren't plated by the 
factory. 

Later commercial versions of the 
SOG knife came from Al Mar Knives, 
Murphy, SOG Specialty Knives & Tools 
and from several overseas sources. Most 
are clearly marked as commercial prod- 
ucts, but unscrupulous sellers sometimes 
alter the knives and offer them as 
wartime originals. 

7>ie author thanks Frank Trzaska for his 
research assistance on this story. The 
illustration is from Knives Of The U.S. 
Special Forces, by Tom Clinton. BCf* 



54 / BLADE 



JUNE 98 



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BLADE /55 



/ 



' By Steve Schwarzer 
Guild vice president 



The Guild Has A Web Page! 



There's an exciting trend in the 
knifemaking business-selling 
knives on the Internet, specifically 
via a web page, and the Guild has one! 
The idea largely has been overlooked or 
ignored by a majority of Guild members. 
From my experience, knifemakers will 
grab a new technique readily and put it 
to work if it involves something that will 
make their knives better physically, such 
as a hi-tech steel, a better heat-treat 
method or a hot handle material. 
However, as a group, most knifemakers 
lend to resist change. With the Guild 
having created its own web page, 
perhaps that resistance will disappear. 

Every major business— and most 
minor ones — are being managed by 
personal computers. The computer age is 
here to stay. It's impossible to see 
anything advertised on TV without the 
advertiser's web site being mentioned. 
The reason for that is sales. I have 
friends in the knife business who are 
getting several hundred inquiries a week 
via their computers. One Guild member 
is selling high-end folders at the rale of 



four to five a month just off the Internet. 
This revolutionary medium will enable 
the Guild to reach a whole new market. 
Millions of people hungry for product 
and information surf the Internet every 
hour of the day. 

The Guild has entered this state-of- 

"The Internet allows 
the Guild to reach a 
whole new market." 

the-art arena but guess what? I turned 
on my computer, logged onto the web 
and looked up the Guild site and found 
that very few Guild members are taking 
advantage of this almost limitless oppor- 
tunity. 

It's not necessary to own a computer 
for Guild members to participate in this 
international forum. Guild members can 
list their names, addresses and phone 
numbers on the web site just like an ad 
in a magazine. The Guild web site 
www.kmg.org contains the list of partici- 



pating members, including associate 
members. It also gives a history of the 
Guild and other valuable information, 
and the site links to other organizations. 
This linking process helps expand Guild 
members" business contacts worldwide. 

If you're a Guild member and have a 
computer, take a look. If you don't have 
a computer, find a friend with one and 
have him/her show you the enormous 
untapped customer base just waiting in 
cyberspace. If you're a Guild member 
and want to participate on the Guild web 
page, contact Russell Horn at web site 
address http://www.horn-ncl.com or by 
phone at (530) 226-9488. And if you're 
not a Guild member, access the web site 
and explore the wide range of Guild 
member knives for sale there. 

The 1998 Knifemakers' Guild Show will 
be July 10-12 at the Riviera Hotel & 
Casino in Las Vegas. For more in forma- 
tion contact D' Holder, Dept. BL, 7148 
W. Country Gables, Peoria, AZ 8538! 
(602) 878-3064 fax (602) 878-3964, 

Blade 




More and more Guild members 
are participating on the Guild 
web page. This folding beauty 
is by the Guild's Tim Herman. 
His address: 7721 Foster, Dept. 
BL, Overland, KS 66204 (913) 
649-3860. (Weyer photo) 



56 / BLADE 



JUNE 98 



From The Forae 



I By Joe Kertzman 



I 



A 



1 



The hot and 
hardy carbons 
and how they'll 
perform for you 



r 



, ed St. Cyr is a smith who has 
'confidence in the blades he 
iforges. "I know the advanced 
high-carbon steels I use will perform 
and take abuse,'" he says. 

A horseshoe blacksmith for 40 
years. St. Cyr was selected this year 
to make the ABS journeyman smith 
blade for auction. 

He forges 52100, 5160, L-6, O-l 
and 1095, among others. Most knife 
steels, he says, properly heat treated, 
make efficient performers. To quote 
Wayne Goddard, "A knife of the 
very best steel may not perform any 
better than one made of an inferior- 
type steel unless it is heat treated to 
bring out the full potential of the 
alloy content." 

"I make carbon blades for their 
cutting ability. Steels like L-6 
and 52100 lake and hold an 
edge," St. Cyr says. 
"You're dealing with a 
strong steel that eats belts. 
I'm hot on 52100. It's a 
high -carbon, high-chro- 
mium, ball-bearing steel 
that deals well with heat 
and pressure. The 
, chrome lends strength 
and other alloys lend 
toughness and flexi- 
bility." 

The proper heal 
treatment of steels, 
like 52100, results in 
correct working hard- 
nesses, which are 
reflected in the knives' 
Rockwell numbers. 
One of the keys to 
proper heal treating is 
getting the steel as 
hard as it can be with- 
out being brittle. 
On knives other than 
swords and 



The tradition 

of forging knife 

blades is carried 

on by such makers 

as Ryan Johnson, 

shown here 

hammering hot steel. 

(Foster photo) 



JUNE 98 



BLADE; 57 



From The Forge 



Jerry Fisk says he's seen 1084 used in a 
wide variety of knives, like these "Gentle^ 
men's Desk Knives" by Jim Batson. 
(Weyer photo) 



Pi 




those that 

will he used for diving. Si. Cyr uses 
52100, with more carbon than most 
carbon steels. At its optimum hardness, 
5211)0 is more brittle than what is ideal 
for long blades and will, of course, rust 
easier than stainless steels. 

St. Cyr's heat treating methods are 
based on articles he reads in BLADE 
Magazine®, written by Ed Fowler and 
Wayne Goddard. "1 edge quench 
because Wayne Goddard said 1 should," 
he divulges, 'it lends flexibility to the 
blade." 

"You're reorganizing structure." he 
adds. "You can destroy structure without 
proper heat treatment." 

Simple Steels, Low Alloys 

ABS master smith Kevin ("ashen says he 
works with carbon steel because he 
forges, and carbon steels are [he simplest 
steels with the fewest alloys. "The richer 
the alloy Content," he says, "the more 
that can go wrong heating it up and 
pounding it. The 10-series carbons are 
the closest you can gel to straight 
carbon." 

Cash en refers to the carbon steels 
Midi), 1084. 1C1K5 and 1095. "1 specialize 
in 1095," he says, "l use it primarily in 
hunting and using knives. It's forgiving 
and good lor small cutting and whittling 
jobs. For chopping I'd go with 5160 or L- 
fi due to shock resistance." 

Though shock resistance can be 
controlled by differential heal treating, 
1095 is difficult to heat treat. Cashen 
says. "The ultimate beginner's steel is 
5160. It's easy to harden," he explains. 
"You can be a real fool on forging and 
still have this steel come out. It makes 



excellent 
camp and large 
chopping blades." 
Initially used for leaf springs in 
autos. 5160 has a toughness to it. "I do 
quite a few long blades in 5160," St. Cyr 
says. "You can make a hard blade from 
516(1 if it's hammered properly. There's a 
lot to be said about working steel." 

Working steel is difficult, but attempt- 
ing to properly heat treat two steels can 
be twice as challenging. "Heat can make 
or break steel." Cashen, who works with 
an O-l and L-6 damascus combination, 
explains. "The chances of ruining steel 
are greater if you're not experienced in 
testing temperature. When you weld two 
steels together, you're making things 
twice us difficult." 

"I like the nostalgia 
of a forged blade." 

-Tim Hancock 

To forge damascus. hladesniilhs look 
for two steels that can both be heal 
treated in water or both be heat treated 
in oil. In addition, they choose two steels 
that result in different colors (grays, 
blues, etc.), and smiths prefer shock 
resistant steels that hold an edge, 

"I go for the hardest blade 1 can get." 
Cashen relates. "Then I draw the temper 
back to give a chopper springiness. If 
you're working with O-l and L-6, you 
can draw back to a high temperature and 
still hold the hardness." 

St. Cyr says O-l lacks flexibility, but 
insists it's a superior edge holder, and 
beyond carbon, has few alloys that will 
rust or stain. Using L-6 with chrome, he 
adds, cuts down on the staining. For 
pattern making and coloring. 1095 is 
added, he notes. 



No Curbon Copies 

"As an ABS bladesmith, I subscribe to a 
certain philosophy," says J.D, Smith. 
"We concentrate on selective tempering, 
building in different areas of hardness 
and toughness, manipulating grain struc- 
ture and adding attractive temper lines." 

Smith forges 5160 for use in knives 
that require a strong, tough edge, like 
machetes, daggers and swords. Tough- 
ness, he says, is the ability to be 
deformed without taking a set. In other 
words, when you bend the knife, it 
bounces hack. To build toughness. Smith 
manipulates the grain structure through 
heat treating. 

"You have to be aware of the steel's 
composition and optimum heat treating 
specs." Smith says. "I achieve effects with 
selective heat treating, giving steels differ- 
ent appearances for different tastes." 

Smith continues, "Selective heat treat- 
ing can be achieved in two ways: By 
heating the blade only in places you want 
hardened, or by healing the entire blade 
to a uniform temperature and quenching 
the edge you want hardened. When you 
quench it. the thinnest part cools first. 
Then, you can mask the parts you don't 
want hardened with a clay coating." 

Smith quenches some steel combina- 
tions, like O-l and 1095 or L-6 and 1095. 
for a good damascus mixture, i like L-6. 
If you use it in damascus. it makes a 
bright stripe because it has three percent 
nickel." he enthuses. "If you use it wi 
1095. you get color contrast in an all- 
carbon steel. L-6 is a nice, low-alloy steel 
with edge-holding properties. I prefer it 
over 5160 for similar applications." 

According to ABS master smith J err 
Fisk. 1084 and O-l make outstanding 
damascus patterns, as does 1 118 i .aid L-6. 
"If they both have chrome or nickel, the 
acid etch has nothing to attack. " Fisk 
relates. 



58 / BLADE 



JUNE 98 



Red St. Cyr forged a 52100 blade for his 
9-inch hunter, but he'd choose other 
steels for swords or diving knives. 
(Weyer photo) 






Fisk says his customers rely on Ihe 
consistency of his culling edges as well as 
the steel's quality and performance. 

To the customer, 
moving from steel to 
steel sounds exotic. 
That's hogwash." 

-Jerry Fisk 

"For performance, alone." he admits, 
"buying damascus is noi worth the price 
increase over other steels. But. damascus 
will hold its value longer. IT the smith is 
skilled, the edge holding on damascus 
and non-damascus steels will be equal." 








When Fisk 
catered mainly to military person- 
nel. 5160 was his steel of choice for its 
toughness. His plan today is to forge 
52 100 for hunting knives, 1 D60 for swords 
and 5 160 for everything else. 

"I'm seeing 1084 on everything except 
swords." he adds, 'i know guys who 
camp tested 1084 and say it cut \5 two- 
hy-lours, seven logs and 30 feet of rope. 
They quit culling because they were loo 
tired. 1084 is a souped-up 5160, 

"A lot of guys want to move from steel 
to steel," he continues. "To the 
customer, this sounds exotic. They say, 
'This must be belter than spring sleek* 
But. that's bog wash. I don't think there's 
such a thing as a had steel if it's beat 
treated to its specs and ground 
correctly." 

The Sled OF Smiths 

"1 like the nostalgia of a forged blade," 



says ABS master smith Tim Hancock, 
who grew up in a blacksmith family. He 
prefers carbon steels for performance, 
edge holding, toughness and tradition. 
"Mv favorite is 52101). limited to 



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BLADE / 59 



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blades I don't want to have a wavy 
lumper line." he says. "It's a deep-hard- 
ening steel." 

For longer blades with temper lines, 
Hancock forges 1084. He said he's able 
to edge quench 1084 to gel a temper 
line, whereas 52100 doesn't show a 
temper line as well as lower earbon 
steels. 

"52100 is a relatively sophisticated 
steel,'' he explains. "I do an edge-style 
full quench on 521 (X), drawing it back to 
give the spine a spring temper." 

Hancock resorts to tool steels for 
damascus edge holding. "1 like the 
simple mixture of O-l and L-6," he says. 
"I like 52100 mixed with either 1095 or 
O-l. If you mix certain elements that 
etch similarly, you don't gel con trust." 

Fowler On 52100 

As the hunter's companion," advises 
ABS master smith Ed Fowler, "a 
properly forged and heat-treated 52100 
blade will perform any task necessary 
working with game. It will not snap like a 
piece oT glass and leave you without a 
knife." 

For care. Fowler warns the knife user to 
slay away from soap and water and 10 
apply a tittle animal fat to the blade when 
not in use. 

"A properly forged 52100 blade will 
hold an edge longer and is easier to 
sharpen. It can be used as an engraving 
steel or to cut buiter," he notes. 

"The only way you'll ever learn 52 100 is 
performance testing on your knives." 
Fowler continues. "The results are reward- 
ing for the btadesmilh who learns to work 
the steel. You have to walk a tightrope on 
time and temperature. 

"The fine crystal structure on the cutting 
edge is the secret." he says. "The most 
significant event in recent knife history is 
the accomplishment of a crystalline si rue- 
lure on the edge of a 52100 blade under 
one micron. It's the essence of sharp (For 
more on this, see Fowler's "52100 From A 
Metallurgist's View" in the October 1997 
BLADE). 

"I've chipped frozen mud out of fender 
wells of a pickup with it: I've pried posts 
using it; I've driven nails with the spine of 
(he blade. Never has a 5210(1 blade quit on 
me," Fowler exults. 

Bladesmiths, like Hancock and the 
others mentioned herein, have taken 
their blades lo extremes that most of 
iheir clients will never put their knife 
blades through. Hancock stresses, "We 
custom knifemukers have to push the 
limits." 

For the addresses of the bladesmiths in 
this story, see "Where To Get 'Em" on 
P"8 e 85. iESe 



60 / BLADE 



JUNE 98 



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You'll get 60 articles - a Best of BLADE 
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You'll build better, more practical and more 
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June 98 



BLADE /61 



By Wayne Goddard 



Forging Stainless: Why 
It's Not Worth The Effort 




The heat range at which stainless steel will move under the hammer is quite narrow as 
opposed to some of the more commonly forged steels such as 1095, 5160 and 52100. 
(Fowler photo) 



Why don't you recommend forging stain- 
less? Are any stainless steels particularly 
good for forging? Can a stainless steel 
knife be selectively hardened or 
tempered? Is that a better answer than 
trying to forge stainless? I'm assuming 
that carbon steel is not good for a dive 
knife. Is this a bad assumption? Would 
the linseed oil treatment or some other 
treatment make the super-durable carbon 
steel blade a viable choice after all? (Jim, 
Oregon, and Keith, Texas) 

I think you're right about carbon steel not 
being good for a dive knife. Salt water 
would probably destroy it in a matter of 
months. I don't think any oil treatment 
would keep it from being attacked by salt 
water. 

My experience with forged stainless is 
limited to half-a-dozen knives — several 
that I forged and the rest forged and heat 
treated by other makers. It's my opinion 
that I learned all I wanted to know about 
forging stainless after forging my second 
stainless blade. It's not so much that I 
don't recommend it but believe it's a 
waste of time and fuel. To put it another 
way, it's not worth the effort. 

All stainless steels can be forged and 
they're all equally hard to forge. When 
compared to commonly forged steels like 



1095, 5160 and 52100, stainless steels just 
don't get as soft at their forging tempera- 
tures. It's very slow going because the 
heat range in which stainless steel will 
move under the hammer is quite narrow. 
I would estimate that the stainless I've 
forged took me nearly 10 times longer to 
shape. Based on my tests, it's my opinion 
that the only thing that forging stainless 
steel accomplishes is to change the shape 
and size of a bar of steel. 

Stainless steel air hardens and that 
means when the forging is finished the 
blade is usually about as hard as it will 
ever be. In such a state, it's not suitable 
for a blade because the grain would be 
enlarged from the forging temperatures. 
The only way to properly anneal stainless 
steel to prepare it for hardening is with a 
controllable furnace that will regulate the 
slow cooling to room temperature. The 
same furnace is necessary to get the accu- 
rate temperature necessary for correct 
hardening and tempering, A hardness 
tester is essential if a proper heat treat- 
ment is to be assured. 

I doubt that a stainless blade could be 
selectively hardened to gain real flexible 
strength. Because of the soak time at 
hardening temperature, it would be diffi- 
cult to reach the hardening temperature 
at the edge without bringing the back up 



to temperature with it. It seems that the 
air-hardening characteristic of stainless 
wouldn't allow an edge quench to be 
effective. Some softening of the back of a 
fully hardened blade may be possible, but 
stainless by nature would never have the 
strength of the usual steels that respond 
to selective hardening and tempering 
(such as 1084, 1095, 5160 and 52100). 

I recommend that you make a proto- 
type/test dive knife blade of 1/4-inch-thick 
440-C. (The strength of 440-C, when 
properly heat treated, will surprise most 
people.) Use good design principles to 
eliminate stress risers and have it profes- 
sionally heat treated to 56 RC. The test 
blade doesn't need a handle; just wrap a 
rag around it and bind it with duct tape. 
Wear heavy leather gloves and a face 
mask. With the edge parallel to the floor, 
put 2 inches of the tip in a vise and see if 
you can break it with sideways hand pres- 
sure. My experience tells me that it 
cannot be broken with hand pressure 
alone — and if it doesn't break, isn't that 
strong enough? 



I'm thinking of getting a power hammer 
for when I retire and have a bit more time 
on my hands to have a go at forging. I 
don't want to get one too big for forging 
blades or making damascus. What size 
does it take to forge a 1-inch-thick block 
of steel? (Harry Hoskins, Australia) 

If a bladesmith has only one power 
hammer, a 50# is ideal for all-around 
purposes. It will work most sizes of mater- 
ial adequately that a bladesmith uses and. 
when the dies are shaped correctly, is 
effective for forming blades. A 1957 Little 
Giant Catalog sheet lists the capacity of 
hammers for "quality production" as 
follows for round stock: 25# — 1 1/4 inch; 
50#— 2 inch; 100# — 4 inch; 250#— 6 inch; 
and 500#— 7 inch. The 25# hammers are 
useful but are under powered for larger 
work. The 100-pound hammers and up 
are good for making large damascus 
billets and drawing them out, but lack the 
ability to shape blades. 

As reported in this feature several 



62 / BLADE 



JUNE 98 



months ago, more and more forging is 
being done with hydraulic forging presses. 
They have many advantages but, for pure 
speed in drawing out material, a power 
hammer ts hard to beat. 

The following information comes from 
Steve and Rolf by way of Rolf in 
Germany after they found information 
describing a new blade material on the 
Internet: "a new ceramic composite tech- 
nology is ours alone, it provides unheard 
of performance capabilities... magnetically 
inert, radically advanced, galvanically 
exempt, hybrid technology. ..abrasion 
resistance has a whole new meaning, 
hardnessapproachingdiamond...holdsan 
edge better than any other knife made, 
harder, denser, and much tougher, unlike 
the flimsy ceramic knives on the market 
today." (Editor's note: The preceding was 
excerpted from Mad Dog Knives' web 
page about its new Mirage X knives. For 
more on them, see the story on the new 
factory pieces for 1 998 this issue.) 

It was in the February 1997 BLADE® 
that I speculated in my story, "Blades Of 
The 21st Century,'' that the knives of the 
future might be composites of ceramic 
and metal. From the sounds of the afore- 
mentioned Internet information, it sounds 
like the blade of the future is here. The 
materials seemed to be out there but no 
one had used the right combination 
matched with a suitable process for 
putting it together. I guess I'm saying that 
all those claims in the Internet ad could 
be true. It may not be advertising hype. If 
"ours alone" means "secret," I would say 
"not for long." 

If the material in question is that good, 
it won't be long before someone else has 
it. I did a web-page search on 
ceramic/ metal composites and found over 
50,000 references. In less than 15 minutes 
I downloaded 25 pages of information, 
some of which listed cutting tools as appli- 
cations. From what I read, I'd guess that 
the blade described may be CMC 
(ceramic-matrix composite). The process 
to make it may be CVD (Chemical Vapor 
Deposition). CVD can deposit any 
element or compound at very high purity 
with a density of 100 percent. 

For more information on these 
subjects on the Internet, start at 
http://www.ultramet.eom/3.html or 
contact Ultramet, 12173 Montague, 
Pacoma, CA 91331. 

Send your questions to BLADE, P.O. Box 
789, Ooltewah, TN 37363-0789. Include a 
SASE for a persona/ response from Mr. 
Goddard. Due to the large volume of 
questions, please be patient in receiving 
your answer. Blade 




a 




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JUNE 98 



BLADE/ 63 



And the 
winner is... 



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Knives crafted especially 

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For information on our quality foiices, call 

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64 / BLADE 




■ By MSG Kim Breed 
5th Special Forces (Ret) 



Cuts Great, Less Filling! 

AMK's Eagle Ultra Light packs a punch in a lightweight package 



■K long, slender blade, thin handle 
^^L slybs and almost no weight help 
^^krank the Eagle Ultra I ighl by A I 
Mar Knives No. 3 on my personal scale 
of pocketknives. The large handle 
comfortably accommodates gloves or 
mittens. The knife rides great in the back 
or front pocket. The clip anchors the 
knife securely, especially on the ridge at 
the lop of blue-jean pockets. 

The Eagle is a superior knife when it 
comes to slicing but it also holds its 
own while performing heavy-duty 
tasks. The mid-lock design and 
ambidextrous thumb studs 
place the knife in the one- 
hand opening category. 
The handle slabs are 
polished black 
canvas Micarta®. 





v v 



grabbing the material 
comes with a straight 
edge.) 



The Eagle 
Ultra Light 
is a good-size 
pocketknife 
that handles 
heavy -duty 
jobs with a 
lightweight feel. 



(The knife also 
or fully serrated 



They also come in white. They look 
great with the stainless pins. 

Boss Geometry 

On a blade just 3/32 inch thick, the edge 
geometry is so superb that it helped 
enable me to use the Eagle to make 40 
cuts on 1/2-inch sisal rope employing the 
straight edge only. The two-step serra- 
tion extends halfway down the blade and 
provides a smooth, slicing cut without it 



The Slice Test 

I used a thick bathroom mat to gauge the 
knife's slicing ability. I started with the 



"The Eagle is a 
superior slicer." 

blade resting against the mat, then 
whipped my arm in a downward motion. 
The Eagle made five 24-inch-long cuts. It 
ripped the mat for 2 inches until the 




The bath mat was no match for the Eagle's taion-tlke blade. 



JUNE 98 




serrated edge came in 
contact with the foam-backed 

cloth, which slopped the blade cold, 
IV you gel a chance to use this medium, 
try it lo compare straight to serrated 
edges. It's fun! 

[ touched up the edge with a leal hei- 
st rop and tried lo get the thin edge to 
chip out. As 1 drew the blade across a 
brass rod. I was amn/ed at the flexibility 
of the ATS-34. It Hexed one-quarter inch 
with no problem. Hals off lo Al Mar's 
heat-treating process! A blade this thin 
that's nol properly heal treated will 
break in a heartbeat. 

Proviso 

For working use. I highly recommend 
(hat you checker the slabs to enhance 
your grip in slippery environments. 



Little Big Knife 

If you like larger knives but not a lot of 
weight, try this one. You won't be disap- 
pointed. Don't worry about the thin 
blade. Its toughness will surprise you. 
Great job by all the people at Al Mar! 

For more information contact Al Mttr 
Knives, ttttn: G. Fadden, Dept. BL, 5755 
S.W. Jean Rd.. Ste. 101. Lake Oswego. 
OR 97035 (503) 635-9229. b£aue 



SPEC CHART 



Knife Eagle Ultra Light 

Company Al Mar Knives 

Design Mid-lock 

Closed Length 4 3/4" 

Weigh i 2 ozs. 

Blade Steel ATS-34 

Edges Straight, serrated or SO/SO 

Hardness 59/60 RC 

Handle Black or white canvas Miearta© 

Suggested Retail $°8-$ 120 





Mother 

of 

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Company 



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black, brown & 
abalone 
OTHER MATERIALS; 

Jig, Pick, Smooth & 
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Buffalo & Ram's Horn, 
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See us at the 
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and the Guild Show 
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Catalog send $2.00 io: 
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P.O. Box 445 

Franklin. JVC 28744 

Phone (704) 524-6842 

Fax (704) 369-7809 



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cat ;j 1 i )g . De a 1 e i i : K] u i ries we I co m c 



JUNE 98 



BLADE /65 




e Steel! 



MKft, 






• « 






U 








The cover of 
an 1898 guide- 
book to the 
gold regions 
shows miners 
working the 
black sand 
beaches at 
Nome. 



Look ctosety and 
you can see the 
maker's surname 
(Todt) stamped 
on the base of the 
blade, (courtesy 
BUI Claussen; 
Levine photo) 



«: a , K TBANSPORWION*- 



: off ices 



," .>*t1L«V»\ 

LGQ. lU- 



5tATTL£^ A&H - 






ijmm^'i 



Celebrate the 

blades the 

sourdough 

used on 

the 100th 

anniversary 

of the 
"Stampede" 



t»-/ 



An 1890s bowie knife by John Todt of San Fran- 
cisco. Overall length: 12 3/4 inches, (courtesy Bill 
Claussen: Levine photo) 



66/ BLADE 



JUNE 98 




By Bernard Levine 



Travelers passing 
through the remote 
village of Carcross 
(Caribou Crossing). Yukon 
Territory, early this 
century likely would pay 
little heed to a middle- 
aged Chilkat Indian 
woman who resided in a 
small log cabin there. She 
lived quietly and dressed 
modestly, except that 
around her neck hung a 
heavy strand of solid gold 
nuggets, strung together 
like trade beads. 

Her name was Kate 
Carmack and the necklace 
was a keepsake. On Aug. 
17, 18%. Kate and her then 
husband George Washington Carmack — 
the son of a Forty-Nmer who had moved 
north from California in 1885 — along with 
her brother, Tagish Charlie, and another 
Indian named Skookrum ("the strong 
one") Jim, had been prospecting along 
Rabbit Creek, a minor tributary of the 
Klondike River in the upper reaches of the 
vast Yukon basin. 

The Carmack party was the first to hit 
real pay dirt in the Great Alaska Gold 
Rush. Rabbit Creek, soon renamed 
Bonanza Creek, was but one of the maze or 
rushing creeks in the Klondike River 
drainage. Every one of the tributary valleys 
proved extravagantly rich in gold, millions 
of ounces all told, waiting to be claimed. 

GOLD! 

When the first two shipments of Klondike 
gold, each worth $750,000, arrived in San 




This unusual photo shows men with knives skinning seals off the Alaska 
coast during the Gold Rush, The skins were sold "Outside, " while seal meat 
was used to feed sled dogs. North of the passes, mighty caribou herds fed 
man and beast alike. 



Francisco and San Diego in June 1897, they 
attracted little notice. However, when the 
steamer Portland, carrying two tons of 
refined gold worth over $1 million, tied up 
at the Schwabacher Wharf in Seattle on 
July 17, reporters and telegraph operators 
had been alerted. In minutes word went 
out around the world: GOLD FOUND IN 
ALASKA! 

Since 1893, America had been languish- 
ing in the depths of economic depression. 
Now, suddenly there was hope. Prosperity 
was in reach. There was gold in Alaska. 
Tree for the taking. 

Well, not exactly. First, the gold was not 
IN Alaska. It was in Canada (later gold 
strikes were made in Alaska around Nome 
and Fairbanks, and in the Tanana River 
Valley, but the Klondike Valley is in 
Canada). Second, the gold might be free 
for the taking but getting there, and then 



getting the gold out. were 
dangerous, difficult and 
very expensive proposi- 
tions. 

No matter. More than 
60,000 men sold their 
farms, mortgaged their 
homes, abandoned their 
businesses and headed 
north. 

But how to get there? 
The All Water Passage 
involved sailing north 
around the Alaska Penin- 
sula into the Bering Sea 
to Saint Michael, then 
building a paddle-wheel 
boat and steaming up the 
mighty Yukon River to 
Dawson. This was a 
tedious journey of more 
than 4,000 mites and most 
of the gold seekers who tried it arrived 
nearly a year late, and returned home 
empty-handed. 

In theory, one instead could cross 
Canada's Northwest Territories overland. 
A few hardy souls did just that in 1897, but 
on those routes men couldn't carry suffi- 
cient supplies to mine Klondike gold prof- 
itably. 

The only practical approaches for gold 
seekers were the two formidable passes 
over the Coast Range from the Alaskan 
Panhandle, and then north into the Cana- 
dian interior. Starting from Seattle or 
Tacoma, Port Townsend or Vancouver. 
Portland or San Francisco, one took ship 
(or barge or boat) either to Dyea or to 
Skagway. Winter was the only safe season 
to cross either pass. 

At Dyea, one's gear and horses got 
dumped into the icy water of Lynn Canal 



JUNE 98 



BLADE I 67 



Stampede Sfeef! 

because the inlet had no docks. From the 
stinking mud flats, one packed in stages 
(Canyon City. Sheep Camp) to the 3,500- 
foot summit of Chilkoot Pass, nearly 30 
miles inland. The last mile was a grueling 
climb, 1,250 feel straight up a frozen 30- 
degree slope right into the clouds. With a 
100-to- 150-pound pack, each gold seeker 
climbed the icy slope, not once but up to 20 
times, for the Northwest Mounted Police 
manning the Customs station at the summit 
would not allow anyone to enter Canada 
unless he'd brought a year's-worlh of 
supplies, including a minimum of 1,200 
pounds of provisions. Besides, climbing 
Chilkoot Pass was the easy part. 

Come spring, when Lake Lindeman and 
Lake Bennett on the north side of the pass 
had begun to lhaw, men would chop trees 
into logs, whipsaw the logs into lumber, 
assemble the lumber into boats, and pack 
the boats with their tons of gear. Then they 
would navigate their frail, roughhewn craft 
more than 500 miles down the swift 
currents and fearsome rapids of the Lewes 
River to Dawson at its confluence with the 
Yukon. 

Unlike Dyea, Skagway did have docks 
but the overland trek was even longer by 
this route, and the country north of 2,900- 
foot White Pass became one vast bog after 
the spring thaw. Nonetheless, in just two 
years Michael J. Heney completed the 
White Pass & Yukon Route railroad from 
Skagway to Lake Bennett (later the rail- 
road was continued to White Horse), and 
put Dyea and the Chilkoot Pass out of 
business. 

The Diggings 

In the Klondike gold region, all the creek 
beds were quickly divided into claims. The 
once desolate valleys became hives of 
feverish activity. Groups of men pooled 
their resources because the job proved to 
be immense. A little gold lay on the surface 
but most had settled down to bedrock 
under dozens of feet of frozen alluvial 
mud. 

First comers built great bonfires to thaw 
the permafrost, then would dig out a foot 
or two before it refroze. and they had to 
repeat the process again. Soon, small boil- 
ers were brought in from which a steam 
pipe would constantly warm the workings. 

Once all the creek beds had been 
claimed, a miner jokingly told a late arriv- 
ing Cheechaco (greenhorn), "try the hills." 
Ironically, the surrounding hard-rock hills 
proved even richer in gold than the pioneer 
placer claims down along the creeks. 

Men would dig out pay dirt during the 
summer, fall and winter. Come the spring 
thaw, ihey would channel the rushing 
waters to wash down the gravel and "clean 
up" their gold. With Mounted Police or 
military escort, they would bring (heir trea- 
sure into Dawson and consign it to trans- 
portation companies for the long water 



voyage down the Yukon to civilization. 

The REAL Gnld Rush? 

Much of the money made in the early days 
of the Klondike Gold Rush was earned by 
the shipping lines that transported the gold 
seekers to Dyea and Skagway, and by the 
outfitters who sold them their supplies. 
These companies put much creative effort 
into advertising. Special train cars exhibit- 
ing gold nuggets, along with photos made 
by the enterprising documentary phologra- 




The stamp "F. Franz Boston " (inset) 
marks the blade of this 1890s bowie by 
Fritz Franz of Boston, (courtesy Bill 
Claussen; Levine photo) 



phcr, Eric A. Hegg, crisscrossed the coun- 
try. Guidebooks in every language were 
published around the world. The books 
and photos, along with many published 
reminiscences, provide ,i vivid picture ol 
the great "Stampede" as it unfolded just a 
century ago. 

Most of the guidebooks included 
detailed lists of supplies and equipment 
required to pass inspection at the border by 



the Mounted Police, as well as ads for 
companies that catered to the Klondikers. 
A typical list included: 

HARDWARE: I long- handled shovel, 1 
pick, 1 ax, duplicate handles, 5 pounds wire 
nails, 5 pounds pitch, 3 pounds oakum, 2 
large files, hammer, jackplane, brace and 
bits, large whipsaw, handsaw, 1 50 feet 5/8 
inch rope, drawknife, chisel, jackknife, whet- 
stone, hand ax, shaving outfit, frying pan, 
kettle, Yukon stove, bean pot, two plates, 
cup, teapot, knife, fork and six spoons, 
buckets, 2 miners' gold pans. 

ARMAMENT: Repeating rifle, 40-82, 
reloading tools and 1 00 rounds brass shell 
cartridges, 1 large hunting knife, fishing 
tackle, snow spectacles. 

Invisible Knives 

You're not likely to find a picture of sour- 
dough (a Klondike gold miner) wearing a 
bowie hecause the Northwest Mounted 
Police strictly banned civilians from wear- 
ing or carrying sidearms of any type. 
Cheechacos. bandits or vigilance commit- 
teemen in Skagway or other Alaska towns 
often wcni armed, though period photos 
depicting this are rare. 

In 1975. I interviewed Alfred Todl. Jr.. 
for my book. Knifemakers of Old Sun 
Francisco. His grandfather. John Todt. 
made knives, locks and sates in San Fran- 
cisco from 1875 until his death in 1915. His 
son and grandson carried on the lock- 
smithing business. 

Alfred Jr. told me that around l%5 "an 
old. old man" tottered into his locksmith 
shop on Second Street and asked to see 
John Todl. He was disappointed to learn 
that the old knilemaker had been dead lor 
50 years. He said that when he was young. 
John Todl had made him a pair of bowies. 
He'd taken the knives with him when he 
went north to Alaska in 1898, While there, 
he'd joined the Northwest Mounted Police. 
He had. so he recounted, broken one of the 
knives "settling" a barroom light some- 
where in the Canadian Northwest. He still 
had the other knife and had saved the 
pieces of the broken one. Would Mr. Todt 
like to see them'.' He certainly would. The 
old man tottered out, promising to return 
soon. He never came back. Perhaps he 
died. Perhaps he just forgot. 

Gold Rush Knifemakers 

In 189K. there was still a handful of old- 
lime cutlers and surgical instrument 
makers in America's cities, men who would 
make a bowie or hunting knife to order. 
Besides Todl, others slill working in San 
Francisco included Jacob Herman Schinlz 
and Michael J. Hayes, Both had been shop 
foreman for Michael Price, who had died in 
1889. 

Price's principal rival. Will & Finek. 
were still "The Leading Cullers of the 
Pacific Slope" in I89K. though by this time 
the old firm had become better known as a 
depart men t store and as the West's leading 



68 /BLADE 



JUNE 98 



Stampede Steeli 

purveyor of crooked gambling equipment. 
Will &. Finck's 1896 mail-order catalog 
showed only a couple of pages of home- 
made cutlery, but these included a variety 
of California-style bowies, dirks (push 
daggers) and hunting knives. Many more 
pages showed imported pocket, table and 
butcher cutlery by such companies as J. A. 
Henckels of Solingen and G. Wostenholm 
of Sheffield. Like all the merchants in West 
Coast ports, Will & Finck made extra 
efforts to ship merchandise quickly and 
safely north to Alaska and the Yukon. 

Cutlers and surgical instrument makers 
in cities as far away as Boston and New 
York would still make bowies to order in 
1898, and a few of their knives must have 
been carried to Alaska by gold seekers, 
only to be seized at the border by Canadian 
Customs officials or Northwest Mounted 
Police. Active knifemakers of the period 
included Fritz Franz, Boston, Massachu- 
setts; Sam Dresser Jr.. Mt. Pleasant. 
Missouri; J.M. Schmid & Son, Providence, 
Rhode Island; August Eickhoff. New York, 
New York; and Kesmodel & Co., Balti- 
more, Maryland (Frederick Kesmodel had 
made knives in San Francisco from 1856 to 
1872, then had returned home to Balti- 
more). 

Klondike Knives? 

Knives of the 1849 California Gold Rush 
were well documented at the time in narra- 
tives, artwork, advertisements, cartoons 
and even photographs. Many examples 
survive in collections today. 

By contrast, the knives of the 1897-98 
Alaska Gold Rush were virtually invisible. 
No doubt every sourdough and Cheechaco 
carried both pocketknives and butcher 
knives but they didn't wear them openly. If 
they had. the knives would've been confis- 
cated by the Canadian Mounted Police. 

As a result, evidence of ihese knives 
must be sought indirectly. Which hardware 
and cutlery firms supplied the West Coast 
in that period? What brands were then 
favored by men in the West? 

The answers to these questions are 
reasonably well documented. Much harder 
to determine are what types of knives and 
which particular patterns the Stampeders 
actually carried. 

The short answer is any knife they could 
get. Provisions, supplies and tools of all 
types were in short supply in West Coast 
ports, and practically unavailable in Alaska 
and the Yukon. Anything useful sold for a 
very substantial premium in the Gold Rush 
region, and few tools are more useful or 
valuable than a good knife. 

For more about the California Cutlers, see 
the new 2nd edition of the author's hook, 
Knifemakers of Old San Francisco, avail- 
able autographed for $39.95 + $3.50 postage 
from Bernard Levine. Dept. BL FOB 2404. 
Eugene, OR 97402. BCBe 

JUNE 98 



GENESIS! 



• 3.9" ATS-34 Tactical Drop Point 
Blade 

• Dual Ti Liners G-10 Scales. 

• Ambidextrous Thumbstuds 

• Bronze Pivot Bushing and 
Teflon™ Blade Washers. 

• Reversible "Deep -Pocket" Carry 
Clip. 

• Available Plain or 1/2 Serrated. 

• Available Bead Blast or TiAINi 
Blade Finish. 

• Made in U.S.A. 



£^/&*^5) 




Suggested Retail; 



Bead Blast Blade: 
TiAINi Coated Blade: 



$135.00 
$155.00 



EDGE DESIGN INC 



Edge Design Inc. 

Dept. BM, 603 West Monroe 

Altamont, IL 62411 

Tel: 618-483-3343 or 

618-483-EDGE 

Fax: 618-483-3344 

www.ediknives.com 



The Next Generation of Folding Knives. 



Sharpening Serrated Blades? 

NO PROBLEM! 





Lansky Sharpeners has all the tools you need to sharpen serrated, scalloped and saw- 
toothed blades— quickly, easily and professional ty. Lansky's specially designed V-shaped 
serrated blade hones are mounted on color-coded, finger-grooved holders — medium grit 
(LSMRT) and fine grit (LSERT) — for use individually or as accessories to a complete Lansky 
multi-angle knife sharpening system. The serrated sharpeners are also packed as kits with 
multi-angle knife damp and guide rod. Or you can choose the NEW Universal Pocket 
Sharpener (LTRIM) that does it all— straight blades, serrated blades, fish hooks, arrow 
heads and needles. Any of these Lansky products will make short, easy work of sharpening 
any serrated-type blade at home, at work or in the field. 

IS LANSKY 

Over 60 different knife and tool %~T.!,?,^ R ?^.l R , S , 
sharpeners, featuring the po Bm 5Qg3Q D , BL 
ultimate in design and technol- Las Vegas Nevada 8g K 01 6 USA 
ogy. Send for FREE Catalog. Phone: (702) 36T-7511 
Fax: (702) 896-9511 



BLADE /69 





Ruffin Johnson 
215 La Fonda 
Houston, TX 77060 
{281)448-4407 

Presentation Grade Knives 
Send S2.00 for brochure 



CUSTOM STEEL STAMPS 



To proudly mark your knives. Made 
to order from your logo, trademark 
or special design. Quality steel 
stamps at competitive prices. 

• Set Prices — no quotes necessary 
oil most stamps 

• Personalized Service 

• Brochure $1 

HARPER MFG. 

Slamp and Die 

3050 Westwood Dr. #B-5 

Las Vegas, NV 89109 

{702) 735-B467 ■ FAX (702) 73S-6895 

1-800-776-8407 

We accept £Q ^P 




And the finest 

production 

m- knives from 

M around 

M the world. 

M See fine engraving, 
Jc casting and knifemaking 
Jf live in the store! 




ianch tt?i}*$ 



FINE CUTLERY 
(702> 733-8333 

Fax7O2/7S2-0333 
3507 South Maryland Parkway, Suite E 
Las Vegas. NV 89109 
Across from the Boulevard Mat! 



September 12&13 ,1998 



Benton Convention Center 
Winston-Salem, NC 

30 mmutes fmm ImKiisbiWW insum-Suknn Alexin 

Only Custom Handmade Knives 

Valuable Custom Ktiiva as I">i*ir Prizes 

Awards (or Kniti'makcrs 

Knite Supplies f*ir Sale 

See World Famous Makers and 
Beautiful Knives in a 

Comfortable and Modem Setting 

Sfiftytflvd h\ the NC dot&n KhfifeNiohsn t luihi 

Tummy McNahW, l^i rector * 40) 5 BrowrLstxm> Re). 
Winston- iiilem, NC 27106 • 910-759-0640 



70/ BLADE 



June 98 



RJ, McDonald 

Slim Folding Fighter 
ATS-34 Blade 
4-5/8" Blade 
G-10 Scales 
Titanium liners 
9-15/16' overall 
length £' 
J2SO.00 

J 




14730 61 Ct. N. 
Loxahatchce, FL 33470 
(561) 790-1470 4-9 p.m. 



KNIVES WANTED! 



Blue Ridge Knives 

k We Purchase Enlire Knife Col led ions 
& Business Inventories! 

♦ Immediate Payment! 
*■ No Collection Too Large 

Or Too Small! 

♦ A Fair and Reputable 
Deafer for Over 



1U Years. 



\n:: , N. 

Gommcmorati'"' 5 
Custom 



^^ 



lW Aihvolfi ml • Ucpl 111 ■ Marion. VA 2-ii54 
Plume WD) T«>tli3 • Fix WO) 7B)-925« 



Knife Dealers Wanted 
We sell dealers only 




Schrade SP-2 3" Lookback 

Our choice of a mi* of 1 st quality models 

Retail $21 .95 Dealer Price $3.99 

$60.00 Minimum Order 
Ship: Add $5 UPS; $7.00 PO; $15 Int. 

FOUNDED IN 1970 

MATTHEWS CUTLERY 

4401- D Sentry Dr. 

Tucker, Georgia 30084 

We ship the same day received. 
Satisfaction Guaranteed. 

Complete 266 page Catalog 

USA $5.00; International Air $15.00 

WestOCkallmajorbrands:Baltsong,Benchmade 
Bear Cutlery, Beretta, British Commandos. 
Brusletto blades & German blades, Buck. Burgvo- 
gel kitchen, Camillus, CAS iberia.Case, Chicago 
Cold Steel, DMT, Dovo, EZE Lap, Frost, Gerber, 
German Eye Brand, Glock, fine hair scissors & 
manicure instruments, Henckets, Imperial, Kabar, 
Kershaw, Kissing Crane, Lansky, Laser pointers 
Leatherman, Under Solingen, Mag Lite, Mario, 
Norton, Old Timer, Ontario, Queen, Straight Ra- 
zors. Razor Strops, Remington, Rigid, Schrade, 
Scissors of all types, SOG, Smith & Wesson, 
Spyderco, Swiss Army, Swords, Taylor, Uncle 
Henry, Ultimate Edge Diamond sharpeners. 
United, Valor, Victorinox, Western, Wyoming and 
Zippo. Over 4000 patterns In stock. 



We carry over 5,000 items of Zippa Lighters 

For Dealers Only! 




National Knife Distributors, Inc. 



Brand Names • Dependable Sales Staff 

Courteous Operators • Quick Service 

Call Us Toll Free at 1-800-447-4342 Or Fax Us 24hrs/7 days a weak (704) 245-5 



• Swords 

lays 

(nives 
res 
i Knives 
systems 
„ wis 
■ Accessories 
"'is, Specials and Deals 




June 98 



BLADE m 



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1 1 S I -a 



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CO » » 




NORTHEAST I'UTUvRV 

couxcrou association 



16th ANNUAL KNIFE SHOW 



June 20 & 21-1998 

at the Four Points Sheraton Hotel 

3580 East Main Street. Waterbury. Connecticut 

(B4 West - Exit 26) (34 East Exit 2SA) 



Antique & Current Factory Knives * Custom Knives * Military Knives 
Razors * Miniatures * Swords • Scrimshaw * Engraving 



Show Hours: Saturday 9 a.m. -5 p.m., Sunday 9 a.m. -3 p.m. 

Admission: S5.00 per day - N.C.C.A. Members FREE 



* Hotel accommodation 

* (860)573-1000 

* Outside Conn (800) 511-0169 



* Show Coordinator* 

* Rubs & Meg Philippi 

* Box 677. M illdole. Ct. 06167 

* (860)621-7776 



* General Information 

* Cindy & Jim Taylor 

* (508) 226-5157 



Bill Moran School of Bladesmithinc 

TeXARKANA CoiLEGE 

American Biadesmith Society 1998 Schedule 



INSTRUCTOR 



DATES 



Kevin Cashen 


Feb. 9-20 


Charlie Ochs 


Feb. 23-27 


Sieve Dunn 


Mar. 2-6 


D arret Ralph 


Mar. 9-13 


Mel Par due 


Mar. 1 6-20 


J, Hendrickson 


Mar. 23- Ap 3 


Crowetl & Fisk 


April 1 & 5 


Bill Moran 


April 6-10 


Joe Cordova 


April 13-17 


Harvey Dean 


May 4-15 


S Schwarzer 


May1B-22 


R. Mawdsley 


May 25-29 


J. Rubley 


June 8-12 


Tim Poller 


June 22-July 3 


J. R. Cook 


July 6-10 


J. Walker 


July 13-17 


Fisk & Massey 


August 24-26 




Aug 29 & 30 


Mel Pardue a Skin 


Aug. 31- Sept. 1 


TBA 


Sept. 28-Oct 1 


James Batson 


Oct. 5-16 


Greg Neeley 


Oct. 19-23 


Crowell&Fisk 


Oct. 24 & 25 


J. Keeslar 


Oct. 26-30 



CLASS 

IntrotoBladesmithing 

Damascus 

Handles & Guards 

Folders - Button Lock 

Folders - Inner Locking 

Intro la BladesmHhing 

Spring Hammer In 

Damascus 

Handles & Guards 

Intro to Bladesmithing 

Damascus 

Silver Smithing 

Primitive Knives 

IntrotoBladesmithing 

Handfes 4 Guards 

Damascus 

Lab Class 

Fold - In 

Folding Blades 

Engraving 

Intro to Bladesmithing 

Damascus 

Fall Hammer In 

Handles 4 Guards 



COST 

$600 
$550 
$550 
$550 
$550 
$600 
$115 
$550 
S550 

seoo 

S550 
£550 
$550 
$600 
$550 
$550 
$550 
$115 
$550 
$550 
$600 
$550 
$115 
$550 



For Further Information: A6S School Director - Mr. Scotty Hayes ■ 90*638-4541 ext. 237 
Texark ana Col lege ■ 2500 North Robinson Boad -Texarkana, TX 75501 



W. F. M B I LL " M OR AN has be en ca II ed the most fa mo us Blades mi I h i n I he wor I d and 
architect of contemporary Damascus Steel He now has two videos available for 
1 the serious knifemaker and the enthusiastic collector. "The Making of a Knife" 
video is a step-by-step explanation of the entire process, beginning with forging 
(he blade from a bar of steel, to fining and finishing the handle. "Damascus" 
explains in detail Ihe process of making a damascus blade. MC/Visa accepted. 
V H S Fo r m at : $53 . 5 PALorSECAMFormat:$58.00 (Includes Postage) 
~ Please contact: ABS • Joe Cordova ■ 505/869-3912- Fax: 505/869-2509 
Post Office Box 977B- Peralta, New Mexico 97042 www.web2.com/abs 
■ » Enhance & Preserve the Art& Science of the forged blade by supporting the 
fc i ABS Endowment Funds with your tax deductible gifts. " e-mail: abs@rt66.com 



72/ BLADE 



June 96 





Specializing In: 

Hand Carved 

Antler and Horn 

Exotic Woods 

File Work 

Stunt' Suitings 

m^ Handmade Sheaths 


L)d£,& 


^j^ 


Custom Sticks 
and Picks 

218 Ferry Slreet 
Lawrence, MA 01S41 
Phone; (978) 975-7727 

Willy B. Ellis 
Knifetnaker 




Come visit us at the Gun & Knife Show 
In W. Springfield, MA - March 14 & 15th 



Joseph 




Custom Knives 
& Tomahawks 

29 Carroll Drive, Wappingers Falls NY 12590 Phone/Fax: (914)297-5397 




The Cutting Edge 

We buy 

Knives 
and Knife 
Collections 



• All custom and higher 
end Factory knives. 

■ We sell knives un 
consignment. 

* 30 years of experience , 

CONTACT 
Paul Chut- Its Basch 

liLA.G, Russell Knives 

1-800-255-9034 

Fax 1-501-872-5209 




1703 N. rhnmpM>ii St 
SpflnrJjlF,AMr3T64-|M« 

OA.ti RoBMBtitoR.lK.t9B 




Unique 

Asian and 

Medieval 

Swords 



A) KATANA 36" overall, highly ornate blade P6" loop vrilti 

silver me la I guard and handle S1 19. 9 5 

B) DARK Dragon hilled kalana is 38" overa!. The blade is 
MAGIC S9ST long. PuHy tempered and sharpened . $199.95 

C) MANILA Sword is hand forged in (he Philippines. The 
KATANA Blade is 20" long and Mi' overall, sharp wilh 

lull lam) handle a nd 1 ally lunctidna I . . . S 1 29.95 

EXCLUSIVE SW0BD DISTRIBUTORSHIP AVAILABLE 

DE A LERS I NQUI R E Method o< Payment: ~™.-,' J. : 

Send $200 lor calaiod; G M -0 G Check fj VisaTMastercard 

COBRA IMPORTS LTD. INC. 

507 N. Warwick Rd. ■ P 0. Box 327 . Somerdale. NJ 08063 
Phone: 6O9-435-079S • Fax: 609-435-0795 



Three Good Reasons to Own 

An EMERSON Knife 




COMMANDER 



EMERSON KNIVES, INC. 

P.O. Box 4325, Redondo Beach, CA 90278-9998 (310) 542-3050 Fax (310) 793-8730 
All Knife Designs are Copyrighted and Patent Pending on the Emerson "Wave" Feature ca 



June 98 



BLADE /73 




WORLD OF WEAPONS, Inc. 



Order our 




JUNGLEE 



P»1»*^T\1SSING 



CRANE 



MICROTECH 



apc--^ HBjWr\W i con 



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s 1 1; villi 



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KNIVES 



ULTIMATE 
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HUGE 

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CATALOG $5.00 

FREE WITH ORDER sio international 

515) Sunbeam Road 
Jacksonville, Florida 32257 USA 

E-Mail WOW USA@AOL.COM 
Internet http://www.wowinc.com 

Manufacturer - Distributor - ImportfExport 
Knives ■ Martial Art Supplies - Sporting Goods 
Exotic Weapons ■ Personal Protection Products 



74/ BLADE 



SHEFFIELD KNIFEMAKERS SUPPLY 

"Quality Supplies for ike Knifemaker" 



• F.xntic and Stabilized Hardwoods 

• Steel -440C.440V, ATS-34, D-2, O-l, 

\-2, Damascus, 416, 304 

• Nickel Silver - liars lock, Sheel, Rod, Tube 

• Cupper - Bars lock, Sheel, Rod. Tube 

• Titanium - Sheel, Rod, Bur 

• Aluminum • Sheel, Rod, Tube 

• Itniss - Bar, Sheel, Rud.Tube 



• Recnnstrucled Stone 

• Handle Bolts -22 Different Slyles & Sizes 

• Leather and Leather Supplies 

• Paper, Linen and Canvas Phenol ics 

• DymnndHond ' - 50 Colors 

• Solder, Flux, Epoxy, Marking Equipment 

• Contact Wheels, Machinery. Abrasives 

• Balden- Equipment, Buffing Supplies 

• Ileal Treat Supplies • Books and More 



• Drills - Cobalt, Carbide, HSS 

• Hum - Stag, Buffalo, Gcidbofc, Bleshok. Springbok 

Catalogs ■ $5.00 V.SA. - Foreign $S.OO • MasterCard, I ISA, Discover 
P.O. Box 741 107, Orange City, FL 32774 • (904) 775-6453 • Fax: (904) 774-5754 



Coleman Made 

Artistic Impressions in Cutlery Steel 



TACtl A M7S.00 plus stag 



"Second Gene ration" 

Tactical Folders 
4" ATS-34 /Titanium 






Brochure £2.00 
Foreign $3.00 




Voting Member 



Keith Coleman 
1.1 Jardtn Kd. B-21. Los t.unus.NM N7n.il 
5U5-H64-0024 
c-mntl: kckni vests'* flash .net 



In the real world you are ready for whatever comes 
your way with an Ed Fowler knife at your side. 




iht: tunc proven tool* cA tin: Eromtcr, thr stflgjc shot nflc H<nd the Unyn\ Mark [nt the man who u&ni$ to own the uhifflau (uncimul 
kntfc, I aOfer truly high pcrfomuaci user Encmlty lames ol cUsBonrai Starting two bearing qiuluy 12100 steel, forged lo wriS though! 
in ii, held pnwrn hl.ide digits Cuvhilty hucdenu'd ^nil Tempered using, my iv*u irn.-mi.il m-.itmriiit Nut produce ,* bU\\t ih,ir crcnbtnei 
edge holding and dar penj ng ease m to .t Lmlc i h-it you c am cuj< fy du r ttig t \\c f^wd ti mt$ -iiul t < miu * *n whirl ihr i hi p> a rr d* >h n My >hi%-p 
Nona handle's totnpkte the knife resulting in A unique p.wkjge o( ftmttfcm, witty, jnd hc-juiy 

48-pqgc hrochsirc "Thr Ut&tjj Knife Drt&n muI ftuKttni* & phnkis nS recoil knives. S3 00 Roc at) ommetiooal video from Hill Bearing 
hi Rljtlc Hmv li'i I\inc. ovri J hnurs nl kmk- ulk nn VHS hmnnt, send $45 * £1 50 SSjN Now scalable tunographed copies ol mj nc* 
becfc"K# &Hr\Sl"4-«* S3 JL-4 SfiTH 

Ed Fowler, ABS Master Blaclcsnuth, RO. Box 1519. Riverion, WY 82501 (307) 856-9815 



June 98 



KBQ 



MICHAEL 
VAGN I NO 



Hand Forged 
■ Hunting 
Fishing 



Kitchen 



ZOS . 528 . 280Q 
POST OFFICE BOX 67 
VESALIA .CA . 93279 



If you really love 
your knives. . . 




Prices V&gj 

starting 

at $35. 

Send $2 

(or new color 

brochure 



. . They 

deserve a 

quality 

sheath! 



Auoctato Member 

Treestump Leather 

HC 31, Box 6434, Bt 200. Dept B 

Ellsworth, ME 04605 

(207) 584-3000 

E-mail address: Sheath Mkr9aol.com 



/y 



rr 



Knife Making 
Sanding Beits 

LOWEST PRICES 



Top Quality Cloth Belts A/0 



Size 


Any grit 


1" x 30" 


.600 ea. 


1" x 42" 


.60^ ea. 


2"x48" 


.950 ea. 


2"x60" 


$1,25 ea. 


2" x 72" 


$1.50 ea. 


4" x 36" 


$1.20 ea. 


6" x 48" 


$2.60 ea. 




* Belts (any-size) sheets, discs, rolls, etc. 

Available in A/0 - sil-carbide, Zirconia, 
Cork, Scotch-brite material 

G.L. Pearce Abrasive Co. 

(Abrasive specialist) 

RD #5 Box 108 
Punxsutawney, PA 15767 

814-938-2379 for info 
800-938-0021 orders only 
VISA, MasterCard, C.O.D. 
Free freight - $5,00 handling 



LONE STAR WHOLESALE 


BEST PRICES VOITVE EVER SEEN 


SPYDERCO 


Minimum Order Required 


BENCHMADE 
CASE XX 


Resale Certificate Or FFL Required 


EYE BRAND 
COLD STEEL 


FFiEE i-/S~T 


SOG 


AAA APA AP JA 


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one Tec Qk^n 


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KA-BAR 


PO BOX 587 


ONTARIO 


Amarillo, TX 79105 


MANY MORE 


FAX 806-359-1603 








Discover Kris Cutlery's selection of 

Medieval Swords & Daggers — 

Barbarian sword to the Ring Dagger! 

THESE ARE REAL SWORDS! 

Send SI for color catalog 

l\r iS CUTLERY 
P.O. Box 133-L Pinole, CA 94564 (510) 758-9912 



THE FINEST IN KNIFEMAKING EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES! 



4 



BURR KING 
KNIFEMAKER 



OVAL 

IVES 

ORDER TODAY! 
1 -800-556-4837 

t-'itr It'chnifitl luivice. pfeese ffitl: 

614/853-0777 

Visit nur Shuwroom at: 

5HI9 Zarley St.. \eie Albany. Ohio 



2 X 72 belt, 1HP, 115/230V. 
Contour & loose belt grinding, 
polishing & deburring; & hollow 
grinding, 

960-200MC 

w/o knifemaker . . .81,039.00 ea 

w/knifemaker 81,269,00 ea 

960-200MC-150variable 

w/o knifemaker . . .81,699.00 ea 

w/knifemaker 81,949.00 ea 



For a complete catalog of knilemaking supplies send $4.00 to: 
Kovol Knives • P.O. Box 492 • New Albany, Ohio 43054 




99 



"Handles With Care 

from 

MASECRAFT 
SUPPLY COMPANY 




Ve 19* 



India Stag, Pearl, Horn, Bone, 

Amber Beads, Exotic Woods, 

Micarta, Carbon Fiber, Celluloids, 

Imitation Pearl, Alternative Ivory, 

Re-con Stones and More 

Call to order our catalog 

EO. Box 423 BT 

254 Amity St., Meriden, CT 06450 

Phone (203)238-3049 

MasterCard & VISA Accepted 



June 98 



BLADE /75 



".a pure joy to carry" 

Sieve Dick. Tactical Knives 

THE PESH-KABZ (Travel Knife) Pictured: 5" blade 
at $215 & 3i/2"at $195. In ATS 34. G10 handles. 
Also available in the NEW Meier clad damascus. 
Includes basic MCS System. 
The patented HEALY MCS System offers 9 carry 
positions - 5 are handle down. Four gold-plated 
rare earth magnets are used to suspend the knife. 
Call or write for a free brochure. 

EB Bud Nealy 
www 822 T h oma s Street 
■*■ stroudsburg, PA 18360 


' ^ 




_ 




m 






^^ 717 421-4040 Fax: 717 421-2593 


Weyer of Toledo 




Q KINNIKIN 

Q Bladesmith in 
ft Mosaic Damascus 




56 John McKeever Rd., House Springs, MO 63051-1924 



oo 



Have you tried hot forging 
your fine blades ? 

You will be pleasantly 
surprised at what can be 
accomplished with a gas 
forge by NC Tool Co. 



Call for a free catalog 



',i 



NC Tool Company Inc 

6568 Hunt Road, Pleasant Garden. NC 27313 

1-800-446-6498 





Doc 
Hagen 
Custom 
Knives 

P.O. Box 58 
Pelican Rapids, 
MN 56572 

Catalog S2 

Office {21H) 863-1343 Home (218) 863-8503 
Fax(21K)S6.1-U43 
www. doc hage n .com 

Fixed blades/Folders/Forged blades 
Damascus blades 

Member: Kmlernakers' Guild & ABS 



GILBREATH 

• Full UmB knffemaker tor 20 years 

• Damascus forging 

■ ATS-34 or 440-C blade steels 

■ Offering a variety of fined 

and folding blades 



Price 
$300.00 

$5,00 S/H 




Send $3.00 for 
color iryformution 

Randall Gitbreath 

55 Crauswell Rd. 

Dora. AL 35062 

205>64S*3902 



400,000RPM Air/C02 Hand Inlay 
Engravipfr&Carving Instrument. 




trim Mt'Jal 
Knife Bin tin 
(rial StwJit 

ULTRA SPEED PRODUCTS, INC 
18S0O E ASCHOFF, ZIGZAG OR 9704S 

503-622-4387, FAX 503-622-3252 
WW w.morn et.ccbn/u Itraspeed 

5 170 (delivered) handpicrc, fool control, 2 

burs, lubrication sys, air filter, stencil sample, 
operators manual and training video. Or send 
$14(rcfundable) + S3 sfVh for training video. 



76/ BLADE 



June 98 



Brend Handmade Knives 
Hand Craftsmanship 
With Old Time Quality 



* Com bat 
"Fighter * Bowie 
Tactical Polder 



M-2-BTF 



$500.00 




Walter Brend 

56 Benton Farm Road 

Walterboro, SC 29488 

803-538-8256 



Titanium Handle S54CM Blade 

Specializing in Blades 
used by all Branches 
of the Military 



Meat Cutter 15 yrs 
Knife Maker 18 yrs 




LOVELESS KNIVES 

Buy - Sell - Trade 



Cull or Write: 

J. W. Denton 

102 N. Main St, Box 429 

Hiawassee, Ga 

30546-0429 



706-896-2292 
24 Hrs. 



Associate Member 
Knifemakers Guild 



FAX 706-896-1212 



HOLLOW GRINDING 

MADE EASY 




Contact: Lowell Snoddv, Reba's Enterprises 

419 Warner SlreeL. NW 

HmHsvMe. AL 35805 (2051 837-0308 



6AL/4V and Commercially Pure 

Titanium, Sheet, Bar, Rod, Stainless 

Steel Fasteners; Carbon Fiber, G-10; 

Titanium Pocket Clip Blanks 



NO MINIMUM ORDER CALL FOR A FREE BROCHURE 

^^ CALL or FAX: 888-28JS627 ' WB 

Web site: http://www.halperntitaniuni.com 

E-Mail Addr.: les®lialper ntitanium.com 



HALPERN TITANIUM 

14 Maxwell Road, Monson, MA 01057 




Americana Ltd. 

219 Stacker Lane, Dept. B 

Smithf ield, KY 40068 

(502) 845-2222 

SUPPLIES FOR KNIFE MAKERS 
FINISHED BLADES 

Dymondwooci 

Epoxy 

Spacer Material 

Pocket Striker Kits 

Stag 

Native Woods 

Hilts 

Blowing Horns 

Exotic Woods 

Brass Tacks 

Powder Horns 

American Wood Products 

Display Stands and Cases 

VISA/MasterCard 
American Express/Discover 
Order Your Catalog Today 

No Minimum Order 
USA $3.00 - Foreign S6.G0 



Your Chock Is Welcome 



( fAwAWiWA kwAImti ^ 

V ■ CALIFORNIA'S LEADING CUILEfiY STORE ■ J 



Plaza Cutlery 

South Coast Plaza 

Costa Mesa, CA 92626 

714-549-3932 



Phone Orders Welcome! 

We accept MasterCard, VISA, & 

American Express. Shipping by UPS. 



At this time we do 

not have a catalog 

but we do have a 

fine selection of 

handmade knives 

and all of the quality 

factory knives. 




Founding member 
NICA 

(National Independent 
Cutlery Associal ion) 
■■ 



Featured this month is Chris Reeve. 

We carry all of the Chris Reeve folders 

and straight blades including seven 

variations of the Sebenza. 

Folders: $295.95 - $450.00 



June 98 



BLADE /77 



A & J Enterprises 

For the Investor or Collector 
of Quality Custom Knives ^A 



P.O. Box 6071 

Branson, MO 65615 

(417) 335-2171 



» 



ERICO. BERCIAND 

CUSTOM 
KNIFEMAKER 

HANDCRAFTED 

SAMI (LAPLANDER) 
AND 

FINNISH-STYLE 
KNIVES 

PO BOX 186 
BLUE RIVER, OR 
9741) 
$41*822-1459 







vka\ 


r BROCHURE 


"^*^^^ - 







o 





o 





,1 1^ h n;L!_) 




Phone: 405-341-3406 
FAX: 405-340-3333 



22001 Ole Bam Road, Edmond, OK 73034 



«CAJUN«— 7Tj\ 

^KfflVfS 




THE SIDE-LOCK™ 



Lifetime Warranty 
Individually Serial Numbered 
440-C Stainless Steel 
No Springs 



•Designed by- 



"^flbicW (3A-& 




S69.9J + 6.00 S/Il 

Most orders shipped sime day. 

Mijor credil cuds, checks accepted 



706-S65-S34J 

]6HHwy. 1Z9S. 

Cleveland (a. 50J28 



Meerdink 

Custom Knives 



Now Available: 
Phase III Fighter 

* with Kydex Sheath 
$285.00 




Credit Cards 

Accepted 



Free Catalog 

J. TVs Knife Shop 

264- East Main Street 

Port Jems, NY 12771 

(914)856-6904 

Email :j tarbel 1 @ Warwick . net 



cSufZ&Ufbd* 




Special Size Orders Welcomed 


SANDING BELTS FOR SHARPENING 


GRIT 36- 150 


3&40/&QW12O,' 

isofiscra 


22<V32tM0a , 60C 


SIZE A.0. 


ZIRCONIUM 


S.C. 


BROWN 


BLUE 


BLACK 


1x30 .75 ea 


1.60 ea 


1.00 ea 


1x42 .75 


1.75 


1.25 


2x48/2x42 1.20 


2,25 


1.S0 


2x60 1.50 


2.80 


2.25 


2x72 1.80 


3.50 


2.50 


4x36 1.40 


3.50 


2.50 


6x48 3.50 


5.50 


4.00 



SPECIALS GHEEN SWISS ZIRCQNIA 
1x42 60/BQ St 20 

4*36 60 $2.00 

6x48 Wm $4 00 



BLACK SIL. CARBIDE WATERPROOF 

9V 1' Sheets $25.00/100 220-2500 Grit 

S'/i"x9Vi - Sheets $10.00/50 24O-20O0 Grit 



CERAMIC BELTS - NORTON* "SG" 

CARBO "MEDALIST" -priced same as Zirconia 



BLUE ZIRCON IA DISCS-I^#HMk and Loop 5' 35( 6" TOe 



DISCS, FLAP WHEELS, SHOP ROLLS 

RED HILL CORP., P.O. BOX 4234. GETTYSBURG. PA 17325 

(800) 822-4003 5 «5SU 



78/ BLADE 



June 98 



JAPANESE SWORD 



Supplies. Featuring 'handle 
grade* Stingray skins, sword 
polishing, scabbards, and all 

sword parts. 

For 23 page catalog, send $5.00 

to: FRED LOHMAN Co. 

3405 N.E. Broadway 

Portland, OR 97232 U.S.A. 



Don't miss the next 



Blade 



Magazine 



Issue Deadline 

July 1998 March 18, 1998 

August 1998 April 22, 1998 

September 1 998 May 20, 1 998 



For more information contact 
IjLADE Magazine 



700 E. State St. 

lola, Wl 54990-0001 

(715)445-2214 

FAX (715) 445-4087 



ENGRAV 



W^ KNIVES YOURS 

Learn lo engrave beautiful Knives and 
Guns using our hooks, video tapes, or 
attend our engraving classes. 

Master this admired skill in your 
spare time with GRS Tools and 
Techniques. 

GRS Tools 
900 Overlander Rd. 
P.O. Box 1153 
Emporia, KS 66801 

call: 800-835-3519 
fax:316-343-9640 



SALE Engraving Videos on SALE NOW 





Tru Hone 

Knife 
Sharpener 



The Tru Horn- Kriif't 
Shurpcncr pv^ you a 

;■■„■"■.■ I . ■.!!.■>.:■: 

knife in a fracrwin of rht 
;imc required by 

i jLl I - 1 m h id ru< L rrtt'chtK'U. h stair piers* hmri l>c^t.li ul j knitc Made 

slmufnTtaKwdy, resulting m tiju.it twtii . ■ i --■. ! precision 
ihiifpnc-si in less rhan a minute. The Tru H«nc can easily be 

i: 1 1 ujs n lJ to (isJCtffni angles .ilkm-ini; ynu m tailor your kftiVfS 
for. ,!■"■. type ol ■ uei ',-.•.■ operation, lis heavy Jury stainless sreel 
construction and v} hp motor means ymi m, : !l „■■. r ysare uf 
Bu JU BB fta UCC free knife sharpening 

Tru Hone Corp. 

1721 NE 19th Ave. -Ocala.FL 34470 USA 
1 -800-237-4663 

(352)622-1213 - FAX (352) 622-9180 



Model 102 

Blade Length: 3.5" 

OAL: 7" 

Chisel Ground 

ATS-34 

Cryo-treated 

RC-63-64 






M-102 Pro-Tector 



$155 

Postpaid U.S. 



Standard cross draw or Optional 
'■Small of Back" (S.O.B) sheath 



Serpan Knives 
Greg & Sandi Serpan 
Rt #1 - Box 10A 
Howard, KS 67349 
1-316-374-2869 



Coming next month M-104 Falcon newTanto style blade 



-cs^^uhY- 


Ric| 


i McDonald 

V* Bladesmith 


4 Ifel^^L 


Pursuing Excellence One Blade At A Time 


r ^^W Hi 


(M^t^^i/* 


Phone & Fax 
(35BH82^)007 




Tfe; tt^fi 


BlKt^ 


4590 Kirk Rd. 
Columbiana, OH 44408 


„ 






Named "Little boy" in Zulu, the Umfaan is 
the smallest model in the range of 
Sebenza Integral Lock © working folders. 



BG42 blade is 2.3 inches 

Titanium frame is 3.15 inches 
Overall weight only 1.5 oz 




• substantial enough to work hard 

• an ideal knife for cutting the caps off cigars 

• an elegant lady's knife for pocket or purse 

• small enough to carry and use everywhere. 

• a perfect gentleman's knife for pocket or briefcase 

Brochure $2.00 

Chris Reeve Knives 

11624 W. President Dr., #B, Boise, ID 83713 

Tel: 208-375-0367 • Fax: 208-375-0368 • email: creeve@micron.net 



June 98 



BLADE /79 



t*"2t«\ &emss&grfD e&ssK T&mss 




HCR 46, Box 19, Oelrichs, SD 57763 
(605J 535-6162 




From 

"7&e 'Pnetin£e& e£ &a&ata, 

Loyd Thorn sen - Bladesmith • Specializing in 
Damascus - Folders - Fixed Blades - Presentation Pieces 



New! Fowler 
Knife ma king 
Video 
$49.95 



To\\>Ur Custom "KniVcs 
-T?c. 4 r &ox &3-'b 
f^chton. Ms. 39476 
(GOD 969-2553 





Fast Service: 

Most knives shipped 

within 2 weeks, 



"VJc iiutfa Custom Leather 6 'Keflex dltcattis for all type knifes. 



'The Automatic Knife Resource Guide and Newsletter 




Sources for ALL automatic knives! .1 Ml ST for ALL smlchhtade funs 



9 Rare and scarce antiques. 
MAmericau-lialiuu-Oerman 
* High-Tech production models. 
9 Exotic handcrafted customs. 



•PaefceJ with FIRST-CLASS photos, 
♦Maintenance & repair lips 
•Free elassilied ads 

•The LATEST trends 

• In lorni at i ve arlicl e-s und feat tiers 

*ow in our SIXTH YEAR. 





TO ORDER YOURS, send Sit) lor a single issue or l.V). 
[138 Foreign J lor a one-vear {4 issue) subscription lo 

THE NLWS LETTER 

2269 Chestnut St., Suite 212-11 
For 24hr. information call: 41 5-664-2 105 S an Kra nti sco, C A M 1 23. US A 



■n 



wanting to buy COLLECTING KNIVES, MT1I|DE 

OR FACTORY KXIYES 



'S 



BUCK KNIVES 
CERBER/FISKARS 

JAPAN AUTHORIZED AGENT 



CUTLERY 



NO. 674. INAGUCH1-CHO, SEKI-CITY 
GIFU PREF, S01-33 JAPAN. 
PHONE:D575-22-eS92 
FAX:0575-24-1B95 
E-ma i I : selo v spice, or. jp 



R.W. LOVELESS 

MAKER 

RIVERSIDE, CJt 




Can a blade hold a better edge 
and sharpen more easily? 



* BOYE KNIVES 

wilh Carbide Crystal metallurgy 




BOYE KNIVES 
P.O. Box 1238 • Dolan Springs, AZ 86441 

(800)653-1617 

Brochure 82.00: refund ahlc with purchase 



GREAT KNIFE 

AUCTION 

Sunday, May 3, 1998*10:00 A.M. 

To Be Held At: Aurrtann Auction Center. 

West Rt. 16, Nokomis, Illinois 

Alt Mint or Pristine Mint! 

Large Collection of Knives 

Approximately 800-900 

Call for a complete listing! 

•|AUMANN AUCTIONS, INC 

Esmm *»"<"■*■« 

^ p- *** - *«4l Nokomis, IL 62075 
Toil-Free: 1-888-AUCTN-4-U 



South Africa's Combat 
Knife Specialist 

PETER 
BAUCHOP 

Custom Knives 

AVAILABLE 
EXCLUSIVELY 
IN THE 
UNITED STATES 




From 

Beck's Cutlery 
and Specialties 

748-F East Chatham Street 
Gary. NC 275 11 
(919)460-0203 
$2.00 List 



80/ BLADE 



June 98 



Blade 



% 



THE WORLD'S 4f\ KNIFE PUBLICATION 

?1t * 



J fc 




TuBfication of 
the 2(nifema%ers 
Quild Association 




-k 5\ SEE 
Guild Directions in 
every issue 



Bob Patrick 




12642 -24 A Avenue 
S. Surrey, B.C. 
V4A8H9 Canada 



Toolmaker by Trade 
Teacher by Profession 
Knifemaker by Choice 

(604)538-6214 



CG 



So. California's MOST COMPLETE CUTLERY STORE 

ROSS CUTLERY 

Located downtown LA. in the historic Bradbury Building (213) 626-1897 
THOUSANDS OF ITEMS IN STOCK 



Bench made, Bokcr, Buck, SOG, United, Swiss Army (great selection of watches), 
Case, Kershaw, MicroTech, White Wolf, Ka Bar, Gerber, Sharpening stones and 
systems, Kitchen Cutlery, Al Mar, Spyderco, Cold Steel, GT, Maglite, Zippo, and 

MANY MORE EXPERT KNIFE SHARPENING ON PREMISES. 

3 ] S. Broadway Los Angeles, California 




TRU - GRIT 



BURR KING 960 - 

KNIFEMAKING MACHINE 

1HP 




CALL FOR 
CURRENT PRICE! 



TG-92 
9" Disc Grinder 
Reversible 
1/3 HP 

1140 RPM 




$495.00 



Specializing in 

knifemaking Belts, 

Ceramic, Zirconia, A/0, 

Silicon Carbide & Specialty 

Belts. 

Large selection of Steel in 

Stock. ATS 34, 440C, BC 42 

416. 

Special- 

3/4 HP Baldor Buffers $335.00 

Call For FREE Catalog 

TRU - GRIT 

760 E Francis St #N (909) 923-7046 

Ontario, CA 91761 (909) 923-41 16 

1-800-532-3336 outside Calif. 

VISA and MasterCard Accepted. 



June 98 



BLADE /81 



Ratdall THaAe Knives 




P.O.Box 1988 
Orlando, Florida 32802 

WRITE FOR 40-PAGE FULL COLOR CATALOG - PRICE S2.00 
INTERNATIONAL MAILING - CATALOG PRICE US S5.00 



REAL KHUKURIS - GUARANTEED FOR LIFE 

CUSTOM MADE IN NEPAL BY HIMALAYAN IMPORTS 

• World class museum quality ■ not to be confused 
with cheap imitations 

• REAL Khukuris- Individually made, 
one-of-a-kind, using traditional tools and 
methods of manufacture 

• Each Khukuri personally selected and purchased 
in Nepal by former Gurkha soldier. Ang Kami 
Sherpa, Stringent Q.C. 

• Steel, brass, or silver guard and buttcap 

• Water buffalo leather scabbard i includes two 
miniatures) excellently done. 

Wide range qf styles ami sixes • Motley i/nfk ifiiumiitec 




Bill Marl mo or Ang Sherpa 
HIMALAYAN IMPORTS 

225 West Moana Lane #226 • Dept BL • Reno, NV 89509 • (702) 825-2279 



Brochure & color photos - $4.00 
refundable with order 




Knifemakers Guild 

th Annual Show & Sale 

| May 2& 3 1998 10 am to 4 pm} 

Days Inn Toronto Airport 

6257 Airport Road 
Mississauga, Ontario 
Canada L4VIE4 



( 



1 (905)678-1400 



] 



Ask For Canadian Knifemakers Guild Group Rate 

Admission: S4.00 individual $8.00 family 

Further Information: (519)565-2196 (519)740-2767 









BOB-SKY KNIVES 

Custom Designs Welcome 


, 




fil^l tp-" 


I 


1 


M-16 Combat ^ 


^r ^B B 


I- 






^^^- V 


Robert J. Hajovsky 


Send $2,00 lor catalog 




^* 




P.O. 

Scotland, TX 
(940) 54 


Box 77 
76379 

1-2219 



CLASSIFIED 
CLASSIFIED 

NO MATTER HOW 
OFTEN YOU SAY IT ... 

it always means 

sales for your 

company! 

The newiy redesigned 
BLADEList Classified Adver- 
tising section of BLADE 
Magazine is without a doubt 
the finest indexed classified 
selling tool in the knife indus- 
try today. 

Consider these facts.,. 

• THOUSANDS of the most 
buying oriented readers in the 
world with each and every issue. 

• HIGHEST income readers in 
the industry. Average household 
income $65,230 

• LARGEST available list of 
headings and classifications. 
Hundreds to choose from. 

• DOUBLE the opportunity to 
sell your product. Blade Maga- 
zine is the only magazine 
published twelve times per year 
in full color. Double the chances 
to reach your customers! 



The more often you tell 
your story . . . 
the better your chances 
of it being heard. 



D Wl 



ORI 



82/ BLADE 



June 98 



collect* net A NETWORK OF 
coiiectit.net CLASSIFIEDS! 



IF YOU COLLECT IT - YOU'LL FIND IT 



Kkjum: publications the world's largest hobby & collectibles publisher, is proud to announce that every 
classified word ad placed in its periodicals will now appear on the Internet's largest collectible classified site at 
www .collectit.net. Here's vour Opportunity to reach thousands of collectors on the World Wide Web! 

A 



// 



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u\m list 

BLADE Magazine's Knife Marketplace 




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The BLADE LIST section of BLADE Magazine accepts display advertising. Please 
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representative. 

CLASSIFIED FREQUENCY DISCOUNT CHART: 

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ORDERING CLASSIFIED ADS (Below): 

Only 400 per word 



Minimum charge is $6.00 per ad. 



Category Hots: Classified ads containing multiple knives for sale will be broken up 
so all Winchester knives are in one ad under a Winchester category and all Case 
knives, for example, would be in another ad in the Case category. Each ad will 
then be billed at least the minimum charge. Our goal at BLADE LIST is to unite 
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PRI NT ONE WORD PER SPACE 



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Send entire form below or reasonable facsimile to 715-445-4087 
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Any ad entered in a "For Sale" 
classification must contain prices. 



Classification it 



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he 



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Please calculate each individual ad you run using I he following worksheet. 

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Classified Headings Available 

'DAMnC LFSCFCfiSAli 6140 l/MICE TVDEC70ATTCDMC '•^ OFFiCEFOR 5S1± 7469 GQODARDlWAYNE I WANTED 



FACTORY BRANDS 

AEFUAl FOR SALE 
AEPTJM. WANTED 

AITOR FOB SALE 

AITOR WANTED 

AL MAR FOR SALE 

*l MAR WANTED 

AMES MFG. FDR SALE 

AMES MFG. WANTED 

A MISCELLANEOUS FORSALE 

A MISCELLANEOUS WANTED 

BEAR M6C FOR SAlE 

BEABHGCWJWIED 

BEMCHMflOE F0R£AU _^_ 

BENCHMADE WANTED 
BENCHMARK FOR SALi 
BENCHMARK WANTED 
BERETTA FOR SALE 
BERETTA WANTED 
BLACKJACK FOR SALE 
BLACKJACK WANTED 
BOKEfl FOR SALE 
BCKER WANTED 

BROQMHEADJ tHOMAS FOB SALE 
BROOMHEADitHOMAS WANTED 
BBOMNGFORSASf 

brownins wanted 

BOUNtttl/LAKOTAFDflSALE 
BTUNTONAAKOTA WANTED 
BUCK FDR SALf 
BUCKWANTfO 
flUCKCRfEKFORSAlE 
BUCK CREEK WANTED 
BUCKLE LtCWHORSE FOR SALE 
BUCIWLLOWHORSE WANTED 
BULLDOG f OR SALf 
BULLDOG WAtlTED 
fi MISCELLANEOUS FORSALE 
8 MISCflLAHfCuS WANTED 
CAMILLUSF05SALE 
CAMILIUS WANtED 
CASE FOB SALE 
CASE WANTED 

case Classes Fos sale 

CASE CLASSICS WANTED 
OTAfWGUSFlSSALf 
CATTARAUGUS WANTED 
GOLD STEEL FOB SALE 
COLD STEEL WANTED . . 
CCILIMS MACHFTESFOB SALE 
CiJUINSIttCHEIES WANTED 
COLONIAL FOB SALE 
COLONIAL WANTED 
CRIPPIE CREEK FOB SALE 
CBIPPLE CREEK WANTED 
C MISCELLANEOUS FOB SALE 
CMLSmiAWQUS WANTED 
DIAMOND EDGE FOB SALE 
DIAMOND EDSE WANTED 
D MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE 
DHISCElLAtttOUSWAWED 
EKfOBSALE 
EK WANTED . 
EC* USA FUR SALE 
EQUIP USA WANTED . 
t MISCELLANEOUS FOB SALE 
E MISCELLANEOUS WANTED. 
FAIRBAIRH-SYKES FORSALE 
FAIRBAIRN-SYKES WANTED 
FIGHTN BOOSTER FDR SALE 
F1GHTN BOOSTER WANTED 
FROST FOR SALE 
FROST WANTED 
FMISCELLANfOUSFCSSALE 
F MISCELLANEOUS WANTED 
GER6ER FOB SALE 
GER5ER WANTED. 



GOLDEN BOLE FOB SALE 

GOLDEN RULE WANTED 

G MISCELLANEOUS f OB SALE 

G MISCELLANEOUS WANTED 

HEN & BOOSTER FOR SALE 

HENS BOOSTER WANTED 

H MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE 

N MISCELLANEOUS WANTED 

WW* FOR SALE 

IBCA'ABCA WANTED 

IMPERIAL FOB SALE 

IMPERIAL WANTED 

I'MEORGEWCSTENHOLM FOB SALE 

I'HjGEOBGEWOSTENHDLM WANTED 

I MISCELLANEOUS FDR SALE 

I MISCELLANEOUS WANTED 

KA-BANfCSSALE 

KA-BAR WANTED 

KAT2 FOR SALE 

KAIZ WANTED 

KEEN HOTTER FDR SALE 

KEEN KOTTEB WANTED 

KERSHAW FOB SALE 

KEBSHAW WANTED . . 

K MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE 

K MISCELLANEOUS WANTED 



v..; 
6325 
633? 

6333 
6340 
EMI 
6348 
6349 
6374 
63J5 
6390 
63S1 
6395 
6399 
6406 
6407 
641? 
64 IS 
64 11 

6419 

m 

6425 
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f437 
■:.:. 
6443 
6MB 
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6454 
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m 

Mil 
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Mil 
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lfsc fdr sale 
lfsc wanted . 
l miscellaneous for salf 
l miscellaneous wanted 

MAHEflSGROSH FOR SALE 
MAHEBSGROSH WANTED 
lAAMLES FOR SALE 
MARBLES WANTED 
MILLER BROS FOR SALE 
MILLER BROS WANTED 
MUELA FOB SALE 
MUELA WANTED. 
U MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE 
M MISCELLANEOUS WANTED 
NEW YORK KNIFE FOB SALE 
NEW YORK KNIFE WAN FED 
T«CA FOR SALE 
WCA WANTED 



6740 
6741 
6750 
6751 
6760 
6761 
bM 
6767 



6773 

6778 
6779 
6784 
6765 
679) 
6791 



6796 
6797 

N MISCELLANEOUS FOB SALE 6904 

N MISCELLANEOUS WANTED 6805 

ONTARIO FOB SALE 6810 

OHIARJO WANTED 661! 

DV3 FORSALE ... 6816 

OVB WANTED 6517 

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE .6524 

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED 6825 

PARKER FORSALE 6630 

PARKER WANTED . 6831 

PRIMBLEUOKN) FORSALE. .6636 

PfllMBlE (JOHN) WANTED 6637 

PUMA FOB SALE 6642 

PIMA WANTED . 6843 

PMFSCaiANEQUS FOR SALE .6848 

R MISCELLANEOUS WANTED 6649 

OUEETIFORSALE.. 6B60 

QUEEN WANTED .6B6I 

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE 6866 

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED 6867 

BEMWGTON FOB SALE 6876 

BEMiNGTON WANTED 6877 

ROBESON f OR SALE 6862 

ROBESON WANTED .6863 
ROOGERS IJOSEPHiS SONS FOR SALE 6SSS 

RODGEBS IJOSEPH 1 4 SONS WANTED 6SSJ 

RUSSELL (A.G1 FORSALE .6892 

RUSSELL IAD 1WANTED 6393 

R MISCELLANEOUS FDfi SALE . 6596 

K MISCELLANEOUS WANTED .6499 

SCHAUS- MORGAN FOB SALE 6912 

SCHATTS MORGAN WANTED 6913 

SWAM FOS SALE 69IB 
SCHRADE WANTED 



SEARS iHWIS SON FOR SALE 
SEARS iHEISRYll SON WANTED 
SHAPIEKH FOR SALE 
SHAPLEIGH WANTED 
SMITH A WESSON FOR SALE 
SMITHS WESSON WANTED 
SOG SPECIALTY FOB SALE 
SOG SPECIALTY WANTED 
SPYOERCO FOR SALE 
SPYQESCO WANTED 
SWISS ARMV FORSALE 
SWISS ARMY WANTED 
S MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE 
S MISCELLANEOUS WANTED 
TAYLOB FOB SALE 
TAYLOB WANTED 
TIMBERUNE FORSALE 
r«M WANTED 
E MISCELLANEOUS FORSALE 
I MISCELLANEOUS WANTED 
ULSTER FOR SALE 
ULSTER WANTED 
UNITED CDTLERTFCfl SALE 
UNITED CUTLERY WANTED 
UT1CA FORSALE 
UI1CA WANTED 

UFjilSCaiANEOUS FOR SALE . 
U MISCELLANEOUS WANTED 
VAl LEY FOBGE FORSALE 
VALLEY FORCE WANTED 
WnORINUXFCfflSAlE 
fflTTOHWDX WANTED 



6919 
.6924 
6925 
6934 
.6935 
694U 
6941 
59*4 
6W 
6952 
6953 
6960 
6961 
6970 
.6971 
6980 



.6991 
6990 



vM Villaneous for sale 

V MISCELLANEOUS WANTED 

WADE & BUTCHER FDR SALE 

WADE & BUTCHER WANTED 

WENGER FOR SALE 

WENGfR WANTED 

WESTER BROS FORSALE 

WE 5TEB EROS WANTED. 

WESTERN FOR SALE 

WESTERN WANTED 

WllLSFINCK FOR SALE 

WILLSFINCK WANTED 

WINCHESTER FOR SALE 

WINCHESTER WANTED. 

WQ5IENKOLM ItEQRGEli SON FORSALE 

tVGSTEMHOLM (GEORGE, t. SON WANTED 

WXY2 MISCELLANEOUS FOR SAlE 

WTO MISCELLANEOUS WANTED 



0991 

7005 
7007 
7014 
7015 
7022 
7023 
7030 
7031 
7036 
7037 
7M0 
7041 
7046 
7047 
7052 
7053 
7059 
7059 
7064 
7065 
7068 
.7069 
7072 
7073 



.7078 
7079 
.7034 
7085 
7032 

m 
KB? 



KNIFE TYPES/PATTERNS 

AOVfRTiSM FOB SALE 
ADVERTISING WANTED 
ART FDfi SALE 
AFtl WANTED 

AUSTRALIAN FIGHTERS Hffl SALE 
AUSTRALIAN F THIERS WANTED 
BARLOW FOR SALE 
SABLOW WANTED 
BASEBALL DAT FOfi SALE 
BASEBALL BAT WANTED 
BAYONETS FDR SALE 
BAYONEISWAIIIfB 
BDtOS FOR SALE 
6EH0S WAJJTEO 

BOOT FORSALE ,. ., 

BOOT WANTED 
BOWIES FOR SALf. 
BOWIES WANTED 
6DiYlE5iANTHlUE! FOB SALE 
6MlE5!WTlflUEL WANTED 
BUTTEBFLY FOR SALE. 
BUTTEBFIY WANTED 
CALIFORNIA FOR SALE 
CALIFORNLA WANTED 



CAM? FOB SALE 
CAMP WANTED. .. 
CANOE FORSALE 

CANOE WANTED. — 

CATTLE FOR SALE 
CATTLE WANtED 
CHARACTER/HERO FOR SALE 
CHARACTEFLKiRO WANTED 
CHRIST MAS' TREE HANDLE FOR SALE 
CHRISTMAS-TREE HANDLE WAITED 
CLUB TOR SALE 
CLIS3 WANTED 
COKE BOTTLE FORSALE 
COKE BOTTLE WAN TED 
C0MMEMQRA1 IKES FORSALE 
COMMEMQRAWESWANTED 
CONGRESS FOR SALE 
CONGRESS WANTED .... 
COPPERHEAD FOR SALE 
COPPERHEAD WANTED 
BAOGEftS FORSALE 
DAGGERS WANTED 
DAGGERS (PUSHi ron SAlE 
DAGGERS iPUSHi WANTED 
DAMASCUS If 0L0EBS1 FOR SALE 
DAMASCUS I FOl MRS) WANTED. 
DAMASCUS I STRAIGHT! FDR SALE 
DAMASCUS i STRAIGHT! WANTED 
DISPLAY FOR SALE 
DISPLAY WANTED 
DIVING FOR SALE 
DIVING WANTED 
DOCTORS FOR SAlf 
DOCTORS WANTED 
EXPER-MEHTAL FEB SALE 
EXPERIMENTAL WANTED 
FANTASY FOB SALE 
FANTASY WANTED . 
FIGHTERS ft* SALE. 



fighters wanted 

FIGUFLAL FOR SALf 
FIGUFtAL WANTED 
FOTDTNGfORSALf 

folding wanted 
fgllWimulmhadei for sale 
folding imultlblajjfiwan ted 
fruit for sale 
fbuit wanted 

HAWKBILL FOB SAlE 
HAWKBILL WANTED 
HOBO FORSALE 
HOBO WANTED 

HUNTING IFOLDERSi FOR SALE 
HUNTING I FOLDERS! WANTED 
HUNTING (STRAIGHT! f OR SALE 
HUNTIIG (STRAIGHT) WANTED 
JACHOWE FOR SALE 
JACKKNfE WANTED 
JAPANESE FOB SALE 
JAPANESE WANTED 
KABARSlUSMCl FOB SALE 
KABARS'USMCi WANTED 
KNUCKLE FORSALE 
KNUCKLE WANtED 
lOBSTER FOR SALE 
LOBSTER WANTED 
MACHETES f OR SALE 
MACHETES WANTED 
MELON TESTER FOR SALE 
MELON If SIER WANtED 
MINIATURES FOB SALE 
MINIATURES WANTED 
MOOSE FOR SALE. 
MOOSE WANTED 

MUSJffiAT FORSALE . - 

MUSKRAT WANTED. 

NAVY FOR SALE 

N4WWANIED 



TDM 

■',. 
■:.-- 

rw 

'".■ 

7113. 

-.■■■ 

7121 
712? 

rts 
na 

7139 

::: 
■i; : 
FIS 

ri53 

'l^r 
7184 

■!■■■- 

7174 
7175 

rw 

'lei 

■- 
rw 

7194 
TUS 

an 
at; 

•:■::> 
LHI 

■■!'■ 

;;:■: 

■;•; 
•:\>. 

m 

7244 
845 

•:v. 
;■■■ 

7264 
T3K 

W 

... ., 

•ri. 

Vvl 

:-■:. 

7290 
7291 

■:■(-. 
':-" 
'■ ■: 
:-.-<■ 

ras 

7322 
923 

7328 
7329 
7334 
7335 
■■-. 
7339 
:.:.: 
7315 
7360 
361 
7366 
7367 
7374 
7375 
"T: 
7377 
7384 
7385 
738E 
':« 
739(2 
7393 
7398 
7399 
7410 
7411 
7420 
7421 
7426 
7427 
7430 
7431 
7438 
7439 
7444 
7445 
7450 
7451 



OFFiCEFORSALE. 
OFFICE WA1ITEE 
M-HAND FOB SALE 
ONE-HAND WANTED 
OSSfJlfOflSAlE 
DSSj'CLA WANTED. 
PSPACHUHS1 FOR SALE 
PABACHUIISt WANTED 
PEANUT FOB SALE 
PEANUT WANTED 
PEARL FOR SALE 
PEABL WANTED 
PENKNIFE FORSALE 
PENKNIFE WANTED 
PHOTS SURVrvAL FOR SALE 
PILOTS SLOTIVAL WANTED 
RADAR FOR SALE 
RADAR WANTED 
RA20BS FORSALE 
RA20RS WANTED 
RIFLE MANS FORSALE 
RIFLEMAN S WANTED 
SCOUT FOR SALE 
SCOUT WANTED 
SENATOR fOR SALE 
SENATOR WANTED 
SERPENTINE FOR SALf , 
SERPENTINE WANTED . 
SETS IMULTI-KNIFfJ FOR SALE 
SETS fM ULMNIFFJ WANTED 
SMATCHEKFCSSALE . 
SMATCHflS WANTED 
SDOBUSTER FDR SALE 
SOOBUSTER WANTED 
SOG (TYPEl FOR SALf 
SOS iTYPE) WANTED 
STAG FOR SALE 
STAG WANTED 
STILETIOSfOBSALE 
SHET10S WANTED 
STOCKMAN FOR SAlE 
STOCKMAN WANTED 
SUIffiSH FOR SALf 
SimflSH WANTED 
SLVQBDSfORSfiLE 
SWCSDS WANTED 
TICKLER FORSALE 
TICKLER WANtED 
TOOUGUN FOR SALE 
TOOUGUN FDR SALE 
iODUPUERS FOR SALE . 
TCOUTLIERS WANTED 
TOOTHPICK f OR SALE 
TOOTHPICK WANTED 
TRAPPER f OR SALE 
TRAPffRWANTfD 
TRENCH FOR SALE 
TRENCH WANTED 
U11LITY f OR SALE 
UTILITY WANtED. 
IVHARNCLIffEfORS 
WHARNCLlFFfWANTfD 
WHITTLES. FOR SALE 
WHITTLER WANTED 
MISCELLANEOUS FOB SALE 
MISCELLANEOUS WAIfTED 

HANDMADES 

BARTROGINUGNIfORSALE 
BARTRUGIHUGHt WANTED 
BSISON(JM) FOS SAlE 
BATSONIJfMi WANTED 
BIRHSIDl FOR SALE 
BIATiSIDj WANTED 



BOSElTONYi FOR SALE 
BOSElTONYl WANTED 
CENTOFANTEiFRANKi FOR SALE 
CfNTOFANTE I FRANK) WANTED 
COOPffi (JOHN laSONtf OR SAIL 
COOPER UOHNHELSONI WANtED 
CORDOVA [JOtl FORSALE 
CORDOVA I JOE I WANTED 
CaONKIWW) FOS SALE 
CR0NK1WW) WANTED 
CRMELLlJAMfSI FORSALE 
CBOWELL I.LAMESj WANTED 
DAVIS jIEBRYl FOR SALE 
DAVIS11ERRYI WANTED 
DEAN (HARVEY) FORSALE 
DEAN iHARVEYI WANTED 
EMERSON If RHE ST I FOR SALE 
EWRSONiERNEST I WANTED 
ENCEUIMi FOB SALE. 
EICEijIMI WANTED 
FI&lJttM F» SALE 
FlSKIJERflYI WANTED 
fOWlERIEDI FOR SALE 
FOWIERIEDI WANtED 
FRANK |HH IFOR SALE 
f RAN* IH Hi WAtlTED 
FURUKAWA l SHIROl FORSALE 
FURUKAWA I SHIAOi WANTED 
GOODAROIWAYIIEI FOR SALE 



7469 
7«1 
7466 
7«7 
7472 
7473 
74(0 
74(1 
7456 
7487 
7492 
7493 
7498 
7493 
7504 
7505 
7520 
7521 
7526 
7527 
7532 
7533 
7540 
7541 
7546 
7547 
7552 

r;a 

7558 
7559 
7564 
7566 
7570 
7571 
7576 
7577 
7582 
7583 
7569 
7569 
7592 
7593 
7595 
7599 
7602 
7603 
761 D 
7611 
7616 
7617 
7622 
7623 
7626 
7629 
7634 
7635 
764C 
7641 
7650 
7651 
7660 
756t 
7665 
7667 
7674 
7675 



7718 
7719 
7736 
7739 
7758 
7759 
TT76 
7779 
750D 
7801 
7816 
7B19 
7B2B 
7629 

7(46 
7849 
7666 
7959 
7698 
7689 
7901 
7909 
7928 
V 
7938 
7939 
7958 
7959 
7960 
7911 
79SO 
7999 
80QS 
8609 
8030 



GCLWCiWArNEi WANTED 


9031 


HENOSlCASONIJiAYifORSALf 


6058 


HENtJRICKSONlJLAYI WANTED 


E0S9 


HENRY IDE) FORSALE 


6063 


HENRY ID fl WANtED 


J069 


HIBBEN(GH) FORSALE 


8068 


HBBENlftU WANTED 


8199 


HOEUSTEVE) FORSALE 


;-.- 


HQEUSTF/EIWANTfO. 


8109 


HOLDER (O'l FOR SALE 


8121 


HOLDER (O'l WANtED 


B179 


HORN IFESSlf OR SAlE 


8150 


HORN IJESSl WANTED 


8151 


HUDSON iROBBINi FOR SALE 


3181 


HUDSON iROBBINIWANTfD 


8189 


«i HILLY MACEIfOR SAlE 


fflH 


IMfLlBULYMACfl WANtED 


8209 


JOHNSON ISTEVEj FOR SALE 


8265 


JOHNSON (SIM) WANTED 


8259 


LAKE iRONiFW SALE 


6300 


LAKE IRCKU WANTED 


8301 


LR.E(JWMYI FOR SALE 


1348 


LILE (JlMMYI WANtED 


8349 


LOERCHHEH iWKFGAFJGI FOR SW.E 


8368 


lOERCHNEfl(WOLFGANGl WANTED 


8369 


lOVELESSltCBl FOR SALE 


8400 


lQVELESS'BOB'YWWEO 


1401 


MOBANlBILLi FOR SALE 


1450 


MORANlRlllj WANTED 


9451 


NICHOLS (FLOYD) FORSALE 


9501 


IHCHOlSlSLDYDI WANTED 


8509 


GCHS i CHARLES) FCR SAlE 


.9565 


DCHSlCHARLES) WANTED 


9559 


OSBORNE iWARRflliFOfi SALE 


1568 


0S80RNE (WARREN) WANTED 


1569 


PARDUEiMELl FOR SAlE 


9511 


PARDUE i MEL 1 WANTED 


9619 


PENDRAYiAlt FOR SAlE 


S559 


PEtiDRAYiALi WANTED 


8659 


RANDALL FORSALE 


mi 


RANDAL! WANTED 


8709 


REEVE ICHRiS) FORSALE 


871! 


REEVE (CHRISl WAN if 


6719 


RICHTIG 1 FRANK) FOR SAlE 


8728 


BICHTIGlFRAIKI WANTED 


1729 


RMYlWILLIEl FOR SALE 


B75B 


B0IEY|WILL€I WANTED 


8759 


BUAfJAlBUDYIfORSALf 


8788 


RUANAlflUOYl WANTED 


8789 


SCAtLELlWLIAMlf Oft SALf 


*■> 


SCAGELiWILUAMlWWTED 


B809 


SCHMIDT IJIM IFOR SALf 


6828 


SCHMIDT I JIM 1 WANTED 


(829 


SCHNEIDER IHEBMAN) FOB SALE 


164B 


SCWlTORMflMAIlj WANtED 


6349 


SCHWAMR (STEVE i FOB SALE 


8668 


SCHWAfffiRiStMl WANTED 


8159 


SHADlfviEUHNEl fOR SALE 


9980 


SMILEY IEUGEFSJ WANTED 


8131 


StGNUUl iCBSSETiFOR SALE 


86(3 


SIGMANiCCRETi WANTED 


16(9 


TEBiUOLAlROBERtlFORSAlE 


8958 


TEfl2D0LA(R0BERT) WANTED 


(969 


WALKER (MICHAEL I FOR 5ALf 


9103 


WALKER IMICHAEU WANTED 


910! 


WARBISKI'BUSTfRlfORSALf 


9150 


WARfTlSlllrBUSTfRlWANTffl 


9T51 


WOlKLERiDANIELIfOflSALE 


9178 


W-IKLER'OAHIEL! WANTED 


9179 


WOOD IBARRYI FOR SALE 


9191 


WOOD iBARRYl WANTED 


9159 


FiRSCELlANEOUS HSNDMAOf FOR SALE 


9224 


MISCELLANEOUS HANDMADE WANTED 


■,;■■ 


MISCELLANEOUS 




PRODUCTS /SERVICES 


t 


BOOKS MADAMSA'iOEIK FOB SAlE 


9100 


BOOKS'WAGABIIES'VIOEOS WAN If D 


■■" 


CATSLOGS'MAII. ORDER LISTS 


9710 


COLLECTIONS FOR SALE 


9720 


COLLECTIONS WANTED 


9721 


EN6RAVMG 


.9740 


HANDLE MATffilALS FDfi SALE 


5770 


HAJItAE MATEfliHSWANTfD 


9771 


HEAT TREATING 


■■:,-.: 


WWE CASE S.TJISPIAYS FOB SALE 


m 


KNIfECLUBS'SOCIEtlES. . . 


9310 


KNIFEMAKIN3 EQUIPMENT FOB SAlE 


9640 


MFEMAKLNG EQUIPMENT WANTED 


9841 


KHlFEMAKIIIGiHSTBUCTIQIi 


9350 


•UIIFEMAKING SUPPLIES FOR SAlE 


9875 


KNIFE SHOPS 


9690 


lEATHERSHCATHS 


9900 


MEMORABILIA IKNIFEl FOR SALE 


9924 


M£l,«jRABIUA(KN*ElWANlED 


9925 


REPAIR IKNIFEl 


9945 


SALESJAUCTIONS 


9965 


SCRIMSHAW 


9975 


SEVICES MlSC 


Sou 



SHARPEN TIG/SHABPENERS 9965 

MISCELLANEOUS FHODUCTSFOB SAlE 9995 
MISCELLANEOUS PRODUCTS WANTED .9997 




BUCK 



6448 



WANTED: HARLEY-DAVIDSON Buck mastodon 
knife. Howie 305-534-4757. fax 305-538-5504. 



BULLDOG 



6466 



ROY FAZALARE- Immediate delivery; Reasonable 
Prices! Free List: POB 1335, Agoura Hills. CA 
91375-1335; 818-879-6161 after 7pm. 



CASE 



6486 



CASE FOR Sale. Tested, xx, USA, 70's, 80's. Also 
sets and commemoratives. We handle most German 
knives and older American knives. Since 1950. 
Robert Werner. 209 4th St. SW. Cullman, AL 35055. 
205-734-5291. 

CASE V-42 96%. Papa's. 1944. Battle of Pelelu. 
Battlefield made scabbard inscribed Palau Ulithi 
Guadalcanal Oahu. Stored 50+ years. Very nice. 
$2,700. 530-877-0320. 9 P3T, Paradise, CA. 

DALE EARNHART 6 times Winston Cup Champion 
set. 7-knife set in walnut wall display, as original, 
$450. 915-446-3055. 

OLDER CASE pocketknives for sale. XX, USA. 10 Dot 
and others. Clean outstanding knives with pretty 
handles. Please call or write for my list. Charlie 
Mattox, PO Box 15S5, Gallatin, TN 37066. 615- 
452-5774 or 1-800-993-3710. voice mail pager. 
Mobile phone 615-419-5669. 

ROY FAZALARE- Immediate delivery; Reasonable 
Prices! Free List; POB 1335, Agoura Hilts. CA 
91376-1335: 818-879-6161 after 7pm. 

WANTED: CASE pocketknives especially 10 Dot and 
older. Check with Charlie before you sell. Call or write, 
Charlie Mattox, PO 8ox 1565, Gallatin, TN 37066. 
615-452-5774 or 1-800-993-3710, voice mail 
pager. Mobile phone 615-419-5669. 

WANTED; CASE Cheetahs and other 11-1/2L 
variations. Top dollar for these and other popular Case 
knives. Sticker, 711 McCormack, Ridgeland, MS 
39157. 601-957-2436. 



COLLINS MACHETES 



NEED AMERICAN made Collins machete and WWII 
jeep ax to replace theft loss. User, not collector. Bill 
850-539-3377. 

CRIPPLE CREEK FOR SALE 6530 

ROY FAZALARE- Immediate delivery; Reasonable 
Prices! Free List; P08 1335, Agoura Hills, CA 
91376-1335; 818-879-6161 after 7pm. 



C MISCELLANEOUS 



6534 



WANTED: COLT knives from the 1970's, especially 
Olsen and Barry Wood models in original boxes. 
Sticker, 711 McCormack, Ridgeland, MS 39157. 
601-957-2436. 



FAIRBAIRN-SYKES 



6580 



COMPLETE SET of six Farbairn Sykes knives, gold 
and silver engraved, gold bordered frame, mfg. 1981, 
cost $2,200, sell $1,800. Ed 602-849-5342. 

F-S FIGHTING knives. WWII, post -wars, 
commemoratives. SASE for list, D. Sail, 1221 
Douglas Ave., Yankton, SD 57078. 605-665-5604. 



FIGHT'N ROOSTER 



6586 



FIGHT'N ROOSTER old and new. Send $1 for list to: 

Carl Edwards, PO Box 632, Vienna, IL 62995. 618- 

658-8221. 

ROY FAZALARE- Immediate delivery; Reasonable 

Prices! Free List; P08 1335. Agoura Hills, CA 

91376-1335; 818-879-6161 after 7pm. 



FIGHT'N ROOSTER 



6586 SWORDS 



7602 



WANTED: ANY Peterbiit Club knives. Please call 
before 2pm, Bryan 615-666-7572. 



GERBER 



6614 



WANTED: GERBER Mark II leather sheaths wanted 
in any condition. Paying cash for them. Call anytime 
days or evenings, Tim 520-868-5698. 



H MISCELLANEOUS 



6654 



HARLEY-DAVIDSON COMMEMORATIVES, Black 
Hills bowie, lug- hilt large bowie, Knuckle head dagger. 
Walt 800-527-8050. 



KRIS AND other Eastern Edged Weapons. I specialize 
in Indonesian and Malay Kris, and Edged Weapons 
from Asia and the East. For twice yearly free catalog, 
write to: Alan Maisey (Tosan Aji), PO Box 316, 
Toongabbie, 2146, Australia. 

THOUSANDS OF Antique Knives, Swords, Pole Arms 
and Armor. Subscription $10.00 per year. W, Fagan 
& Cb., Box 425K, Fraser. Ml 48026. 

WANTED: INDONESIAN and Philippine Swords, Kris, 
Knives, Spears, Shields; good quality antique wanted. 
Roy 516-829-8827. Fax 718-281-2005. 

JAPANESE SWORDS and related items wanted by 
private collector, any condition, cash paid. Bill 612 
850-7158. after 6pm CST or Iv.msg. 



PUMA 



6842 



PUMA. KNIFEMAKERS to the world since 1769. 
Finest quality handmade hunting, fishing, and 
collector knives. Color brochure and discontinued list 

$2. Investment Cutlery, P.O. Box 544B. Auburn, MA 
01501. Your full line Puma dealer. 



MISCELLANEOUS 



7674 



SMITH & WESSON 



6940 



WANTED: SMITH And Wesson first generation 
knives. Also factory display cases and advertising. 
Sticker, 711 McCormack, Ridgeland, MS 39157. 
601-957-2436, 



VICTORINOX 



7046 



R.H. FORSCHNER knives, professional cutlery made 
in Switzerland by Victorinox Co. Send for free catalog. 
C.A.D. Cutlery Co., 14100 Barbara Cirlce, Cooksville, 
MD 21723. Dealer inquiries invited. 410-442-2846. 



FOR SALE; Pocketknives; listing of over 700 antique 
knives including New York Knife, Cattaraugus, older 
Case, Primble, Schrade. Russell, Keen K utter, 
Robeson and some pre 1900 knives including Joseph 
Gardner, Also some knives out of J.T. Becker and 
Ralph Scruton collections, including Case Zippers. 
Send $3 {refundable with first order). Please request 
regular list. Jerry Skelton, Rt 1, Box 225, Alamo, TN 
38001. PH 901-656-2443. 

I'M SLICING up high knife prices like Jack the 
Ripper. Colt Steel, SOG, Spyderco, Benchmade and 
more. Way below retail. Don't miss out! Send $1 for 
catalog, to: Btaderunner, PO Box 323, Delaware, OH 
43015. 

THOUSANDS OF Antique Knives, Swords, Pole Arms 
and Armor. Subscription $10.00 per year. W. Fagan 
& Co., Box 425K, Fraser, Ml 48026. 



BOWIES 



7152 



BOSE (TONY) 



7778 



UNFORGIVEN BOWIE serial number (P) this 
prototype Bowie was to be used as a back up blade 
for the film Unforgiven. $2,500. Chris 250-766- 
4000. 



ROY FAZALARE- Immediate delivery; Reasonable 
Prices! Free List: POB 1335, Agoura Hills, CA 
91376-1335; 818-379-6161 after 7pm. 



CENTOFANTE (FRANK) 



7800 



BOWIES (ANTIQUE) 



7158 



ANTIQUE BOWIES. Many fine old knives priced to 
sell. Send $5 for list and colored photos to: Dale 
Jeche AKDA #98, Box 731, Shakopee, MN 55379. 



DIVING 



7290 



EARLY FIXED blade, drop point. 3-7/8 blade, 8-1/4 
overall, tapered tang, burgundy Micarta. originla 
sheath, mint, $385. Eric 305-257-3225. 

COOPER (JOHN NELSON) 7818 

MORE THAN 20 Coopers in my collection. All are in 
excellent condition. Walt 714-496-5844 evenings. 



DIVING KNIVES: Wanted older brass Hardhat diving 
knives. Gilbert Aja, 4 Park Plaza #120, Irvine, CA 
92614. 714-474-1775. Fax 714-553-9133. 

FOLDING (MULTI-BLADE) 7338 



DAVIS (TERRY) 



7888 



ROY FAZALARE- Immediate delivery; Reasonable 
Prices! Free List: POB 1335, Agoura Hills, CA 
91376-1335; 818-879-6161 after 7pm. 



6516 ROY FAZALARE- Immediate delivery; Reasonable [lie (JIMMY) 

Dr,r.= c l Tnnw Uncu Torn, n^Ac Fuoono ^harllov ^l^»- W" )_ 



Prices! Tony Bose, Terry Davis, Eugene Shadley, 
many others. Free List: POB 1335, Agoura Hills. CA 
91376-1335; 818-879-6161 after 7pm. 



8348 



FRUIT 



7344 



RAM BO, LARGE original, DZ, Johnson sheath, like 
new, $795. Toothpick, 12", old. great stag scales, 
beautiful grind, best one available, $1,250. Eric 305- 
257-3225. 



SILVER FRUIT knives. 11 total, 1 Georgian, 8 
Victorian. All have MOP handles. Larsen 406-265- 
5206, after 4pm, MST. 



LOVELESS (BOB) 



8400 



ONE-HAND 



7466 



LOVELESS KNIVES wanted: Gordon White, PO Box 
181, Cuthbert. GA 31740. 912-732-6982 anytime. 



SPRINGS: BOKER Toplock I, II and Benchmade 
stainless replacement springs. $4.50 ea. M.O. only. 
Rich 212-383-9043. 

TACTICAL KNIVES! We stock quick custom and 
production made one-handed tactical knives by 
J.A.S., Bailey, Benchmade, Boker, Paragon and 
Microtech. KSK Cutlery. 2618 Scotswood Drive, 
Garland, TX 75041. For list send $2. 972-840-6793 



MORAN (BILL) 



8450 



MORAN, HUDSON, Miller. Reeves and other fine 
knives. Visa, Mastercard. Steve Lewis, PO Box 6545, 
Colorado Springs, CO 80934-6545. 719-685-3937. 
WANTED: MORAN AND other fine knives. Cash 
buyer, will travel, collections desireable. References 
furnished. P.O. Box 6545, Colorado Springs, CO 
80934-6545. 



RAZORS 



7526 RANDALL 



8708 



LARGE COLLECTION Of razors for sale. Most in mint 
condition. Manufactured in Sheffield about two 
hundred years ago. Write: Peter Fenger, Kyoto, 
Sakyoku, Shimagamo. Nakagawara cho 14, Japan 
606. 



SWORDS 



7602 



I WILL pay top dollar for old Randall knives with 

Heiser sheaths in original condition. McCotter 919- 

633-5697. 

MODEL 12 "Bear Bowie". Leather handle, Duralumin 

butt cap with Model A sheath, made 1989, $250. 

Kent 205-852-9267. 



ANTIQUE SWORDS and armor of Asia, Pacific, Islam, 
Africa. 5 photo catalogs $8.85. Seven Stars Trading 
Company, PO Box 4666, Alexandria, VA 22303. 
Internet Gallery: www.sevenstarstrading.com 



REEVE (CHRIS) 



8718 



SEVERAL LARGE models, new discontinued. 
Jereboam, etc. Also several 25th Anniversary small 
Sebencas, NIB. Eric 305-257-3225. 



June 98 



BLADE 785 



GET A FREE KNIFE! 

JUST ORDER $40.00 (OR MORE) WORTH OF BOOKS ON THESE TWO PAGES 





Swords of 
Imperial 
Japan, 
1868-1845 

by Jim 
Dawson 
Details the 
military, 
civilian, 
diplomatic 
and civil, 
police and 
colonial 
swords of 
the post- 
Samurai 
era as well 

as the swords of Manchukuo, the 

Japanese "independent" territory. 

Soflcover 8-1/2x11 ■ 160 pages* 263 

b&w photos • 35 illustrations 

SWIJ $29.95 




Battle 

Blades 

Takes the 
work out of 
lin cling the 
fighting knife 
best suited 
to your 
needs and 
budget. 
Learn all the 
practical 
considera- 
tions that go 
with owner- 



ship. 



Hardcover 8-1/2x1 1 • 168 pages ■ heavily 
illustrated • BATB $30.00 



The Art of 
Throwing Weapons 




mm 



Art of 

Throwing 

Weapons 

Reveals the 
history and 
secrets 
behind 
throwing 
tomahawks, 
knives, 
spears, 
throwing 
stars and 
boomerangs. 

Softcover * 5-1/2x8-1/2 ■ 102 pages 
• 60 photos • ATWP $10.00 

Antlers & 
Iron II 
Actual 
plans so 
you can 
build your 
Own moun- 
tain man 
folding 
knife using 
ordinary 
hand tools. 
Step-by- 
step instructions, with photos, for layout, 
design, antler slotting and springs. 
Soflcover 8-1/2x1 1 • 40 pages ■ 1 00 
photos* ANT02 $12.00 





North 
American 
Indian 
Artifacts 
A Collector's 
Identification 
and Value 
Guide, 
5th Edition 
by Lai Hothem 
Pay tribute to 
the unique cul- 
ture of Native 
Americans 
with this newly 
updated book. 
Identify and value Native American weapons, 
clothing, baskets, blankels. ceremonial 
pieces, and hundreds ol other historical 
artifacts. Softcover • 8-1/2 x 1 1 • 360 pages 
* 1 ,250 b&w photos * 69 color photos 
INAFV • $22.95 

~ The Hand 
Forged Knffe 

Solidifies the 
basics so you 
can master 
techniques for 
forging, hard- 
ening and tem- 
pering knives 
and other 
stainless steel 
tools. Covers 
the entire 

process -start to finish. 

Softcover 6x9 • 1 36 pages • fully 

illustrated • HFKN $12.95 




KNIFE 
WORLD 




The Best of Knife World, Vol. Ill 

The Best of Knife World. Vol. Ill, selects a 
balanced variety of articles for all cutlery 
enthusiasts. More than 70 stories- Scout 
knives, Tomahawk Cutlery, The 
Elephants, Toenail, Elk knives, pocket 
knives, Kabar Combat Classic and more. 
Softcover • 8-1/4x10-3/4 • 310 pages 
• 470 photos & illustrations 
BOKW* $13.95 




, COtUSCTOC 



iMdian Knives 



How to 

Make 
Folding 
Knives 
A Step-By- 
Step How-To 
by Ron Lake. 
Frank 
Centofanle 
and Wayne 
Clay 

Follow easy 
instructions 
on how to 
make your 
Own folding 
knife. 

Includes safety tips, suppliers lists and 

answers many questions from three lop 

custom makers. 

Soficover> B-i/2x 11 • 193 pages* 350 

b&w photos • KMF01 ' $13.95 

Collecting 

Indian 

Knives 

Identitication 
and Values 
by Lar 
Hothem 
Lar Hothem 
maps the 
sharp-edged 
weapons and 
ceremonial 
knives used 
and crafted 
by Native 
Americans 
from every region. Historic photos and 
accurate values help you complete your 
quest for a definitive guide on identifica- 
tion. 

Softcover • 8-1/2 x 1 1 • 1 52 pages ■ 503 
b&w photos • CIKN * $14.95 



Modern 
Combat 
Blades 

Practically 

analyzes 

modern 

edged 

weapons 

available to 

military 

personnel 

and civil- 



Perfect (or collectors, professionals 
and military buffs. 
Softcover 8-1/2x1 1 • 122 pages » 
photos • MCBL $25.00 






Complete 
Book of 
Pocket knife 
Repair 
A Culler's 
Manual 
by Ben Kelly Jr. 
Everything you 
need to know 
to repair almost 
any knife. 
Large photos of 
each step 
guide your pro- 
ject, start to fin- 
ish. Includes 
equipment lists, 
safety rules, and materials and equip- 
ment directory. 

Softcover -6x9* 130 pages • 100 b&w 
photos ■ KPR01 • $10.95 

How to 

Make 

Knh*M 

Learn how 
wilh The 
bible of knife - 
making." 
Complete 
instructions 
on making 
high quality 
handmade 
knives. 
Forging and 

stock removal, mirror polishing, shealh 

making, safety techniques, required tools 

& supplies and more. 

Softcover ■ 8-1/2x1 1 • 182 pages • 448 

photos • KHM01 S13.95 

American 
Premium 
Guide to 
Pocket 
Knives and 
Razors 
Identification 
and Value 
Guide. 
4th Edition 
by Jim 
Sargent 
S Hundreds ot 
rare photos 
and a huge 
section on 

Case sheath knives. This edition updates 
current values and uncovers developing 
trends in pricing. Softcover • 8-1/2 x 1 1 * 
496 pages - 1 .500 b&w photos ■ 34 color 
photos * APGP04 ■ $22.95 





STAY SHARP! 

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we'll send you this great FREE gift! 
Gerbers Magnum L.S.T.® Junior is a 
drop point folding pocket knife with a razor 
sharp 2 3/4 inch blade. This lightweight 
pocket pal has two finger notches for a 
strong grip and is the perfect size for 
those spur-of-the-moment jobs. A $29.20 
retail value, it"s yours FREE with our com- 
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Dealers! Call 888-457-2873 * Ext. 791 *r M-F 8am-5pm CT 

For bulk order Information and a complete hobby book catalog 



THE MOST COMPLETE SELECTION FOR YOUR 



HOBBY AVAILABLE ANYWHERE! 




Levine's Guide to Knives 
| and Their Values 

The Complete Handbook 
of Knife Collecting, 4th 
Edition 
I by Bernard Levins 
i This handbook partners 
more than 1 .500 of the lat- 
est knife values with perti- 
nent historical overviews 
and expanded brand lists. 
Numerous additions, signif- 
icant pricing revisions and completely reworked 
sections make this a bible for collectors with a 
reputation for accuracy and excellence. 
Softcover* 8-1/2 x 11 - 512 pages* 1500 b&w 
photos -LGK4* $27.95 

Collins Machetes and 
Bowies Limited 
Edition 

by Daniel E. Henry 
A beautiful, gold- 
embossed hardcover 
edition of Daniel E. 
Henry's book is also 
available. Limited to 
only 104 copies. Individually hand-num- 
bered. 

Hardcover * 232 pages • 200 photos 
CBMHO $60.00 





Knives '98 

18th Edition 

by Edited by Ken Warner 
Explore a broad range of 
knife subjects with the most 
prestigious publication in the 
field. Various sections show- 
case more than 1 ,000 of the 
latest in custom and factory 
offerings for 1 997, To get the 
most from your collecting, 
look to the complete directo- 
ry of the world's custom knifemakers and manufac- 
turing cutlers along with knife organizations and 
publications. 

Softcover* 8-1/2 x 11 • 304 pages • 1000+ b&w 
photos «KN98* $21.95 

I Collins Machetes and 
Bowies 1845-1965 

by Daniel E. Henry 
Edged-instrument fans 
get the most comprehen- 
sive history of Collins 
machetes and bowies 
! ever published inside. 
Daniel E. Henry includes 
more than 1 ,200 blade 

instruments, and blade accessories are 

profiled, 

Softcover • 8-1/2 x 1 1 • 232 pages * 200 b&w 

photos -CBM01 • $19.95 




Get a FREE 

Gerber Knife with 

any order over 

$40.00! 



^YW 



Knife Talk 

by Ed Fowler 

This compilation of articles 
from Blade magazine is 
sure to be treasured by 
anyone who appreciates 
the value and beauty of a 
good blade. While much 
of the book is devoted to 
how to make knives, it also 
explores why we make 
and use knives. Sections 
include: Function: Design 
"and Techniques; Knife Talk 

Philosophy; Forging and Heat Treating; Legends; 

and Interactions with the Outside World. This 

book is above all great reading, 

Softcover* 8-1/2 x 11 * 160 pages* 180 b&w 

photos ■ 20 color photos • KNTA * $14.95 




| THE OHO DIGEST " 

BBOHOfKniUES 



7VA 



The Gun Digest Book of 

Knives 
5th Edition 

by Jack Lewis & Roger 
Combs 

Explore the many topics of 
the knife industry; military 
knives, swords and sabers, 
collecting and restoration, 
etching, and forging knives 
the old-fashioned way. 
Read the biographies of 
some of the great makers, as well as bright new- 
comers to the art. Also includes a detailed knife 
trade directory for supplies, knives and makers. 
Softcover • 8-1/2 x 1 1 • 256 pages • 500 b&w 
photos • GDK5 • $19.95 



How To Make 

ML Ul-BLADE 
'». FOLDING 
- * KNIVES 



**' fV 



How to 

Make Multi- 
Blade 
Folding 

Knives 
by Eugene 
Shadley & 
Terry Davis 
This step- 
by-step book 
teaches 
l knifemakers 
how to craft multiple-bfade folding 
knives. Every aspect of construc- 
tion-trom design to completion-is 
carefully explained for two different 
styles of knives. 

Softcover ■ 8-1/2 x 1 1 • 192 pages 
* 200 b&w photos 
MBK01 * $19.95 



CREDIT CARD CUSTOMERS 
CALL TOLL-FREE 




The IBCA 
Price Guide 
To Antique 
Knives 
2nd Edition 
by J. Bruce 
Voyles 
Get updated 
prices on 
40,000 knives, 
in six grades 
of condition, 
inside this complete guide to collect- 
ing pocketknives from 1800-1970. 
Grading, trends and history of more 
than 35 manufacturers included. 
Softcover • 8-1/2 x 1 1 • 480 pages • 
2,500+ b&w photos 
KAK02* $17.95 




IBCA Price 
Guide to 
Commemorative 

Knives 
1960-1990 
by J. Bruce 
Voyles 
Delve into 
descriptions, 
quantities, 
prices, manufac- 
turers and values for no less than 
1,200 knives, J. Bruce Voyles also 
includes expanded terminology, 
exclusive listings for collecting clubs. 
Softcover * 8-1/2 x 1 1 * 256 pages 
• 400 b&w photos • KCK01 • $16.95 




FREE 

QERBER 

KNIFE! 



800-258-0929 • Dept? K3MK 



M-F 7am - 8pm, 
Sat., Sam - 2pm CT 



Complete & return with payment to: 

Krause Publications 

Book Dept. K3MK. 

700 E. State St., 

tola. WI 54990-0001 



Count me in ! Send me the book(s) I have listed below. 

□ For my order of $40.00 or more send me the Gerber L.S.T. pocket knife. 

Qty Title Code 

! — 



loin the 

International 
Blade Collectors Association 

• Special discount on IBCA club 
knives • Get Edges A times a year 

• Get Blade List every quarter 

• Free admission to the Blade Show S 
International Cutlery Fair 

• Free admission to the California 
Custom Knife Show 

For only S12 a year, you can get 

special benefits and special savings. 

IBCA brings you the wonderful 

world of knives! 



Dept. Code K3MK 



Price 



Total i 



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City 



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Shipping 
Tax 
Total 



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Phone (. ). 

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□ Check or M.O. {to Krause Publications) 
Charge my: Q MasterCard Q Visa 

□ Discover/Novus □ Am. Ex. 
Expires: Mo Yr. 



Signature 

Shipping & Handling: Book Post ■ $3.25 1st book; $2 ea. add' I. Foreign addresses $10 1st book. $5 ea. add'l. 
Call for faster UPS or Overnight rates. Sales Tax: Wl res. add 5.5 .%, 

Visit and order from our secure web site: http://www.krause.com 



SCAGEL (WILLIAM) 



SCAGEL KNIVES and Axes wanted: Gordon White, 
PO Box 181, Cuthbert, GA 31740. 912-732-6982 

anytime. 



SHADLEY (EUGENE) 



8880 



ROY FAZALARE- Immediate delivery i Reasonable 
Prices! Free List: POB 1335, Agoura Hills, CA 
91376-1335; 818-879-6161 after 7pm. 



WARENSKI (BUSTER) 



BUSTER OESIGNEO collection made prior to Sept. 
1984. Three knives engraved by Harrington, Very 
unique, $1,475. Eric 305-257-3225. 



8808 MISCELLANEOUS HANDMADE 9224 

WANTED: ANY condition handmade knives; Randall, 
Scagel. Ruana, F.S. fiichtig. Morseth, Bone. Cooper. 
Loveless, Moran, Lile. etc. Also military knives and 
pocketknives, watches. Send description and price to: 
Angelo Solino, 201 Toronto Ave., Massapequa, NY 
11758, 516-798-4252. 

WANTED: SCAGEL, R.H. Ruana, Randal), Loveless, 
Morseth, Remington, and Marbles knives and axes. 
Any Heiser knife or axe sheaths. 912-732-6982, 
anytime, Gordon White, Box 181, Cuthbert, GA 
31740. 

WE BUY custom made knives. Also looking for any 
size collection of Randall and Loveless. Eurochasse, 
398 Greenwich Ave., Greenwich, CT 06830. Tel: 
203-625-9501. Fax: 203-761-9963, Attn: Hani. 



9150 



MISCELLANEOUS HANDMADE 9224 BOOKS/ MAGAZINES/ VIDEOS 9700 



A&J - Custom Knives For Sale- W.F. Moran, Jr., Horn. 
S, Hoel, H.H, Frank, Loveless, Lake and many Other 
lop makers on hand. Full line of the Al Mar line. A&J 
Enterprises, Box 1 343 SSS, Springfield, MO 65805. 
417-335-2171. Buy, sell, trade or consignment. 
$2.00 for list. 

A8J - Custom Knives Wanted- W.F. Moran. Jr.. Horn. 
S. Hoel, H.H. Frank, Loveless, Lake and many other 
top makers. The Al Mar line. A&J Enterprises. Box 
1343 SSS, Springfield, MO 65805. 417-335-2171. 
Buy, sell, trade or consignment. $2.00 for list. 

ALL AMERICAN sheath knives. Knives from my shop 
to your retail store. Clean work of original designs 
made & sold with your profit margin in mind. Dial 
800-962-4042 tor general information. Tom 
Barminski, Loveland. Colorado 80537. 

AZCK- CUSTOM knives for sale. Top makers, low 
prices, great service. Color catalog $3. Arizona 
Custom Knives, Jay and Karen Sadow, 8617 E. 
Clydesdale, Scottsdale. AZ 85258, 602-951-0699. 
Buy, sell, consign. 

BUSFIELD CUSTOM made knives. Walt 800-527- 
8050. 

CARTER, FRED Daggers, fighters, folders. Serious 
inquiries only. Walt 800-527-8050. 

LAKE, FOLDER, Lever- lock, Pearl inlay. Gold pins. 
tooth pick. $3,800, others available from my 
collection. SASE for list, Frank, 4577 Carambola 
Circle South, Coconut Creek. FL 33066. 954-978- 
8614, 

DIGBY'S FINE Custom Knives- from Sheffield, 
England. Send for details. Also, reputable dealers 
required. Dtgby's, PO Box 3629, Beach Station. Vera 
Beach. FL 32964. 

EUROCHASSE - Custom Knives for sale- Schmidt, 
Horn, Lake, Loveless. Buy. Sell. Trade. 203-625- 
9501, 

EXOTIC GEM quality stone blades with polished, 
carved stone handles in beautiful oak display cases. 
Flint knives with Antler handles. White River Supply, 
PO Box 460663, Aurora. CO 80046. Call for free 
brochure. 800-248-2309. 

FOR SALE: H.H, Frank folding dagger- $15,000. J. 
Kelso dagger- $8, 000, V. England dagger- $7,000. V. 
England lighter- $4,000, L. Fuegen forged scroll 
folder- $5,000, L. Fuegen forged scroll folder- 
$3,000. Send SASE to: 1 112 Susan Way. Sunnyvale. 
CA 94087 for photos and info, 

FOR SALE: Set of 3 Limited Edition #16/25 Predator 
Knives made by Jack W Crain. the original designer 
and maker of the knives for the Arnold 
Schwarzeneggar Movie Predator. The knives are a 
Predator Machete, M.C.S.. and a Hunter, All are 
stamped with the serial numbers and are signed. 
Comes in a velvet lined walnut display case, $6,000. 
609-399-4020. 

HAND CRAFTED Frontier and Revolutionary War 
Knives. Indian Daggers, many custom Bowies 
available. All knives come with custom sheaths, $90- 
$300. Send $3 for color photos to: George Sweeney. 
171 Dean St., Mansfield, MA 02048. Bladesmith 
508-3395509. 

HARVEY DRAPER, Bowie Fighters, Elk Hunter, Elmer 
Keith. Walt 714-496-5844 evenings. 

LLOYD HALE Fighter, 5" blade, ivory micarta, tapered 
tang, tooled leather sheath, beautiful, mint. $700. 
Albert 209-462-3789. 

RON LITTLE knives, duplicates from collection. Sell/ 
trade to upgrade. Goble, 2148 New London. 
Snellville. GA 30078. 770-972-1309. 

WANTED: ALL top custom makers. Buy, sell, 

consign. Arizona Custom Knives, Jay and Karen 
Sadow, 8617 E. Clydesdale, Scottsdale, AZ 8525B. 
602-951-0699. Color catalog $3. 



BILL MORAN instructional knife making videos. 
Making of a Knife 90 min. $55. Damascus 90 min. 
$55. Handles. Guards, Sheaths, 140 min.. $65, incl. 
S&H. Check or MO: PO Box 2077, Olympia. WA 
98507. 

BLADESMITHING BOOKS on knife making, tooling, 

techniques. Free brochure. Oak and Iron Publishing, 
Box 1038, Kingston, WA 98346-1038, 
(oaknironfti silverlink.net), (www.silverlink.net/ 

oakandirorV) Gene Chapman 360-297-2495 

BOOKS ■ Are you a Knife Buff? We have books, 
600+ titles. We also buy books. Send LSA2SE to: 
D&B Knife Readables, PO Box 3405, Area B. 
Pearland. TX 77588-3405. E-mail: 

dbknfeadfunpwt.net 

FOR YOUR copy o) "The Using Knife. Design and 
Function" send $5.00 (includes shipping) to: Ed 
Fowler, Willow Bow Ranch, PO Box 1519. Riverton, 
WY 82501. 

HOW TO Make Custom Quality Knife Leather, 1:48 
VHS instructional video. George Cubic, Leathersmith. 
shows you step by step techniques to build a pouch 
sheath with a camlock welt and a scabbard style 
sheath. You'll learn decorative touches and lots of 
extra's Send check or MO for $29.95 plus $3.50 
S&H. To: GC Custom Leather Co., 10561 E. Deerfield 
PL. Tucson, AZ 85749. 520-760-5988, 

KNIFE MAKING for beginners, a book on making 
knives by grinding, filing and sanding. Low cost and 
tow tech. Send $12.50 plus $2 S&H to Tom Rogers. 
119 N. Haven Dr.. Kalispell. MT 59901. 

THE KNIFE Fighting Encyclopedia, The Congress df 
American Knife Fighters training manual, by W. Hock 
Hochheim. Over 300 pages. 19 Chapters, 1,000 step 
by step photos of knife strategies, flow drills and 
techniques. Oversized paperback. $55 includes 
postage. C.A.K.F., Box 50193, Denton. TX 76206. 
www.americanknifefightefs.com/ E-Mail: 

Hockhochfn aol.com 

VIDEO: FROM Bearing to Blade to Finished Knife, an 
in depth discussion and demonstration of forging 
techniques that lay the foundation for a high 
performance knife by ABS Master Smith, Ed Fowler. A 
full 122 minutes of "Knife Talk" for the man who 
wants to understand Knife Function and Design, be he 
a knife maker or connoisseur of high performance 
knives. High performance heat treating techniques 
performed before the camera, that can be done in 
your shop without the necessity of expensive and 
unnecessary "Hi-Tech" equipment. $48.50 incl. 
shipping. Ed Fowler, PO Box 1519. Riverton, WY 
82501. Phone 307-856-9815. 



BUY, SELL. TRADE 



9705 



BUY, SELL, Trade Early American collector knives: 
Case, Remington. Western States. Robeson. Ka-Bar. 
Cattaraugus, Keen Kutter, Schfade. Marbles and other 
high quality brands in excellent plus or better 
condition. Especially interested in Scagel. J. Seale, 
11711 Buckingham Rd„ Austin, TX 78759. Free 
knife list every two months. 512-258-3925. 

CATALOGS/ MAIL ORDER 9710 
LISTS 

ALL CANADIANS, order from Canadian dealer 
specializing in quality knives by mail order. Some of 
the quality brands carried are: Beretta, Blackjack, 
Boker, Browning Knives, Buck, Chris Reeve, Coast, 
Cold Steel, DMT, Gerber, Katz Knives, Leatherman, 
Puma, Silva, SOG, Spyderco, Victorinox, Wenger. To 
receive a catalog, please send your name, address, 
phone number, and $2.00 for postage to: Knives 
APlenty Inc., PO Box 67052, St, Lambert, Quebec 
J4R 2T8. 



CATALOGS/ MAIL ORDER 9710 
LISTS 

ANTIQUE KNIVES list of over 200 knives and related 
items. Send $1 to cover mailing to: Roger Worley, 
3611 Pasadena Dr., Boise, ID 83705. 208-344- 
4625. 

BELOW WHOLESALE cost, going out of business, 
health reasons, catalog of over 900 different, send $6 
(refundable with first order) to: Cut & Run Cutlery. 
Box 8088, West Chester, OH 45069. 

BENCHMADE, SOG, Cold steel. Gerber, Spyderco. 
Case, Buck, Remington. Leatherman, Ontario, Smith 
& Wesson, Puma, and more. Huge discounts'. Free 
list. Visa, MasterCard. AX, Discover, gladly accepted. 
Knives Plus Mail Order 800-687-6202, 

BENCHMADE, SPYDERCO. Eclipse $45, Mel Pardue 
$130. Free catalogs. Srazos Knives. 1813 Dawson 
Dr., Lufkin, TX 75901. 409-634-7025. 
(brazosftt inu.net) (http://www.inu.net/brazos) 

BENCHMADE SPYDERCO and more at prices you 
can afford. Send two dollars for current list 
(refundable) to: Desert Knives. PO Box 710315, 
Santee, CA 92072. Albert 619-448-0075. 

BULLDOG BRAND- Fight'n Rooster- Cripple Creek- 
Handmade Folders: Roy Fazalare. POB 1335, Agoura 
Hills, CA 91376-1335; 818-879-6161. Free List! 

CANADIAN DEALER serving the collector for the past 

5 yeafS. Hundreds of brand name knives in stock for 
immediate delivery; Benchmade, Cold Steel, SOG, 
and more! Marto and Gladius swords as well. Phone 
or tax for price and delivery. Thousands of satisfied 
customers Mailorder to Canada and U.S. Visit us at 
our new location when in Toronto at the Woodbine 
Shopping Centre across from the Woodbine Racetrack 
at Rexdale Blvd. and Hwy. 27, Rexdale. Ont. 15 
minutes from the airport. S&R Knives Inc., Rexdale. 
Ontario, PH# 416-675-6464, FAX 416-675-6465. 
Visa & AM EX accepted. 

COLLECTOR GRADE knives- Queen, Schatt. Morgan 

6 Robeson. Ka Bar, Remington, and Case, We stock 
the complete line of Queen knives, including Spec 
Plus, We have Knifepaks and cases. Contact us for 
your needs. Send $2,00 for our latest catalog. S&S 
and Sons Cutlers, PO Box 501 C. Lomita, CA 90717. 

DISCOUNTS UP to 55% on name brand knives; 
Case, Buck, Puma, Hen and Rooster, Bulldog, 
Henckels. Smith and Wesson, Gerber, Boker, 
Benchmade, Spyderco. Schrade. many more. No 
minimum order, free brochure. Sooner State Knives, 
401 E. Main. Konawa, OK 74849. 580-925-3708 
VISA/MC. 

FOR SALE: Antique, custom and factory pocket 

knives, folders, fixed blades, dirks, daggers, bowies, 
military, primitive and ethnic. Current catalog free. 
$12 for one year's subscription of pictured monthly 
catalogs. Northwest Knives and Collectibles 503-362- 
9045, anytime. 

HAWAIIAN DEALER! Large selection of custom 
knives from Hawaiian and other top makers. Send $3 
for catalog of custom and discounted production 
models. When in Honolulu visit our store. Waikoloa 
Ouxshot. 331-C Keawe Street, Honolulu, HI 96813. 
Ph/fax 808-521-7741 

HUGE LIST! Updated, (300+ knives), 80% antique 
folders. Including Remington HS&B Schrade Keen 
Kutter Diamond Edge, 80+ Robeson's etc. Early 
Winchester reproductions, limited editions, fixed 
blades, military, hunting and ethnic. Write Or call for 
free list. Shelton Collectible Knives, Paul Shelton, 
1406 Holloway, Rolla, MO 65401. 573-364-3151. 

KNIFE LIST: Usually 200+ old/ new/ discontinued 
items. $1 (refundable) and large SASE to: Knives, 
1426 S. 167th St., Omaha, NE 68130, 

LIST OF over 200 Antique Knives. Including Ka-Bar. 
Grizzly, Presto, Flyfock. Case, Remington, Lapama, 
Italian pick locks and many more brands. Send $3.00 
refundable with first order. Skelton Enterprise, Jerry 
Skelton. 3795 Hwy. 188, Alamo, TM 38001. 901- 
656-2443, Request list "S". 

LOW PRICES: Over 900 knives and swords. Cold 
Steel, United Brands, Marto, Gladius. Fury. C. 
Reeves, Paragon. Buck, SOG, Benchmade, more. 
Credit card orders accepted. Send $8 ($16 overseas) 
for illustrated catalog or send SASE along with item 
request for price quote. LS Products, 1454 Rockaway 
Parkway, Box 240-BL, Brooklyn, NY 11236. 

PERSONAL SECURITY Products- Stun Guns, Pepper 
Spray and Foam, Alarms. Knives- Hunting, throwing, 
collectible. Exotic weapons. Swords, Martial Arts 
weapons, Crossbows, Stealth Slowguns, more. 
Something for everyone! Send $3 cash (refundable on 
first order) for full catalog. LNL Products, 4804A 19th 
St. W., Bradenton, FL 34207. 



88 /BLADE 



June 98 



By Judge Lowell Bray 



Butterfly Knives: Blades 
The Law Can't Classify Part I 



One knife that consistently has 
given courts a problem is I lie 
butterfly knife or balisong. 
Though some statutes deal with the knife 
direct (y and by name, most don't. This 
creates a problem for many law enforce- 
ment officers and prosecutors who seem 
to know in their hearts that anything that 
looks like a butterfly knife has just got to 
be illegal. Some judges are tempted to 
agree and consequently there are 
attempts to classify the knife under some 
term that's specifically covered in a stat- 
ute. Switchblade and gravity knife are the 
two classifications under which the bali- 
song is most often placed. 

(Editor's note: Bali-Song® refers to 
butterfly knives made by. and is n regis- 
tered trademark of. Bench made Knife 
Co. In its generic form. Balisong or ball- 
xong is often used as another name for 
the butterfly knife.) 

As previously has been noted in 
"Your Knife Rights." the U.S. Customs 
Service sometimes qualifies a balisong as 
a switchblade under the Federal Switch- 
blade Act. and sometimes it doesn't. 
Customs looks to other characteristics of 
the kniTe to determine whether it's a 
weapon and then decides whether it's a 
switchblade. The next few installments 
of "Your Knife Rights" will examine 
some cases in which state courts have 
struggled with this classification issue. 

Jefferson vs. Mott 

In 1987, the County Court of New York 
in Jefferson County considered a motion 
to dismiss an indictment against Michael 
S. Molt, who had been charged with 
criminal possession of a weapon in the 
third degree. The indictment charged 
that Molt previously had been convicted 
of a crime and now had been found in 
possession of a gravity kniTe in violation 
of New York law. The law defined a 
gravity knife as "any knife with a blade 
which is released from the handle or 
sheath thereof by the force of gravity or 
the application of centrifugal force 
which, when released, is locked into 
place by means of a button, spring, lever 
or other device." 

The judge examined the knife in 

JUNE 98 



question and recognized it as a butterfly 
knife or balisong. In his written order the 
judge said: 

Such a knife is a biding knife with a split 
handle. In the closed position, the knife is 
covered on each side and at the point by two 
metal guards attached to the blade's base. To 
open the knife, the metal guards are folded 
back until they meet and are clasped and 
thereby form o handle for the blade. Far the 
reasons that follow, it is the court's opinion that 
Balisong knives are not proscribed by Penal 
Law B265.02. 



"A Balisong is not a 
gravity knife within 
Penal Law 265.02." 

— a Jefferson County, 
New York, judge 



First, a Balisong knife is not a gravity knife 
within the meaning and intent of Penal Law 
265.02. A Balisong knife does not have a 
blade which is released by the force of gravity 
or application of centrifugal force. Although a 
person with the requisite skill can rapidly open 
a Balisong knife with one hand, the knives do 
not have blades which open automatically by 
operation of inertia, gravity or both. Since the 
knife cannot be used until the second handle is 
manually folded back and clasped, the court 
finds that it does not open automatically by 
force of gravity or inertia. 

Furthermore, the blade of a Balisong does 
not lock into place at the moment it is released 
os a gravity knife should under its definition. 
The Balisong knife does not operate automati- 
cally since it requires at least two manual oper- 
ations even alter the blade is exposed: (1) 
grasping and folding the second handle and 
(2] fastening the clasp which locks the handles 
together. 

The judge also noted that since the 
legislature was very specific in describing 
many items it did wish to outlaw, it was 
reasonable to infer that it didn't intend 
to outlaw the items it didn't specifically 



name. Based on this reasoning, the 
indictment was dismissed. 

Onondaga vs. Dolson 

Two years later, the County Court of 
New York in Onondaga County 
reviewed a ease in which a trial court had 
allowed Martin Dolson to be convicted 
of possession of a gravity knife. The 
appellate court noted that both officers 
who testified were asked to descrihe the 
knife and referred to it as a "butterfly 
knife." not a gravity knife, and the offi- 
cer who demonstrated "flicking" the 
knife open admitted that it was not 
locked in place by that motion. 

The court described the knife as 
follows: 

The knife in question, in the closed position, 
is covered on each side by two metal and 
wooden guards attached to the blade's base. 
After being unlocked by removing the safety 
lever, the blade can, in fact, be released from 
its sheath by a flick ol the wrist, thereby utiliz- 
ing centrifugal force to expose the blade, 
although it is difficult to say whether this was 
possible when it was new, or whether by alter- 
ation or use this has become possible. While 
this appears to meet the first part of the statu- 
tory definition of a gravity knife, an important 
difference exists here. The blade of the knife 
recovered from appellant does not lock into 
place "when released" from its cover. 

The court then reviewed and quoted 
extensively from the Molt case, and 
accepted its logic. It held that the knife 
was nol a gravity knife under [he New 
York statute. 

New York wasn't the only state to 
struggle with this issue. Next month 
"Your Knife Rights" wilt review how 
this argument fared when il moved oui 
West. 

Facts taken from People vs. Matt. 522 
N.Y.S. 2d 429.137 Misc. 2d 757 (1987), 
and People vs. Dolson, 538 N.Y.S. 2d 
393, 142 Misc. 2d 779 (1989). 

77ie author hits been a judge since 1973. n 
lawyer since IV82 and is a journeyman 
smith in the A US and a probationary 
member of The Knifemaken' Guild. 

Blade 

BLADE / 89 



Bucklite Tool Weighs 
Less And Dees Mere 

The Model 355 Bucklite Tool from 
Buck Knives features L3 basic tools, 
pivots open and closed, measures 
4 1/8 inches closed and weighs 6 ounces. 

For more information contact Buck 
Knives, attn: Robert Morgan, Dept. BL, 
POB 1267. El Cajon, CA 92020 (800) 
326-2825. 



Alverson Releases 
Fancy Hunter With 
A Composite Handle 

Turquoise, amber and coral high- 
light the composite handle on R.V. 
Alverson 's 9 1/2-inch fancy hunter. 
For more information contact R.V. 
Alverson, Dept. BL, 1158 Maple St., 
Klamath Falls, OR 97601 (541) 884-91 19. 



Lambert Knife Sports 
5 OO- Layer Damascus 

Jarretl Lambert's piece sports a 
500-layer, W2 and 203-E damascus 
blade and a desert ironwood handle. 
For more information contact Jarrell 
Lambert, Dept. BL, 2321 FM 2982, 
Granado.TX 77962 (512) 771-3744. 




Wile One Hander 
Showcases Ironwood 

Peter Wile employed reverse rope 
file work on the ATS-34 blade of his 
5 3/8-inch linerlock® with a thumb 
stud and an ironwood handle. 

For more information contact Peter 
Wile. Dept. BL, R.R. 3. Bridge water, NS. 
CANADA B4V 2W2 (902) 543-1373. 





Coast Carries Bead 
Blasted Linerlocks 

Coast Cutlery Co. offers three one- 
hand linerlocks® with Kraton®- 
inlaid aluminum handles, a D1.4 
stainless steel blade and a belt clip. 

For more information contact Coast 
Cutlery Co., attn: Nancy Morgan, Dept. 
BL, 2045 S.E. Ankeny, Portland. OR 97214 
(800) 426-5858. 



United Unleashes 
Hibben 2001 Fighter 




u 



nited Cutlery Brands offers a Gil 
'Hibben design wilh a double 
guard, a 420 J2 blade and a cast 

metal guard, pommel and spike. 

For more information contact United 

Cutlery Brands, attn: Kit Rae, Dept. BL, 

1425 United Blvd., Sevicrville, TN 37876 

(423) 428-2532. 




90 /BLADE 



JUNE 98 



Atkinson Showcases 
Ivory Handle Slabs 

ick Atkinson's fixed blade features 
a mastodon ivory handle and a 
fileworked 440- C blade. 
For more information contact Dick 

Atkinson, Dept. BL, Hwy. 77, Wausau, FL 

32463 (904) 638-8524. 




I Leisure Lubricant 
Keeps Parts Moving 

Leisure Innovations features White Light- 
ning, a lubricant that keeps knife parts 
free of dirt arid grit 
For more information contact Leisure | 
Innovations, attn: Chris Rufkowski, Dept. BL, 
POB 6098, Los Osos, CA 93412 (800) 390-9222. 



Mosaic Damascus 
Graces Lerch Folder 

atthew Lerch employed mosaic 

damascus, titanium liners and an 

ivory spacer for his linerlock®. 

For more information contact Matthew 

Lerch, Dept. BL, N88 W23462 N. Lisbon 

Rd„ Sussex, WI 53089 (414) 246-6362. 





CATALOGS/ MAIL ORDER 
LISTS 

SPYDERCO, BENCHMADE, Cold Steel + More. We 
sell 'em cheap. Largest selection, lowest prices, free 
catalog. Ruffs Dept. BM, 20747 Wiygul Rd., 
Umatilla, FL 32784. 352-669-6440, FAX 352-669- 
2119, 9am-6pm EDT. 

THROWING KNIFE catalog and instruction sheet sent 
free for SASE to: Tru- Bala nee Knife Co., PO Box 
140555, Grand Rapids. Ml 49514. 

450 PAGE color catalog featuring Benchmade, 
Spyderco, Al Mar, Gerber, Kershaw and over 100 
others. $6 refundable with $50 order. Guns Si Knives 
Inc. 800-922-7791. 



9710 ENGRAVING 



BETTER ENGRAVING for less, over 25 years at the 
bencti. Send SASE for information to: Eric Kunti, Box 
226, Catlettsburg, KY 41129. 

FOR SALE: Gravemeister w/3 handpieces, 
magna block, GRS sharpener system. Used very little. 
In exceNent condition, $1,200. Kevin Keller 435-563- 
9200. E-mail: netpilot<« mail. mtwest.net 

LEARN TO ENGRAVE knives and more in your spare 
time. It's rewarding and profitable. Free details, full 
catalog. GRS, 1-800-835-3519. 



9740 KNIFE CASES/ DISPLAYS 



9800 



HANDLE MATERIALS 



9770 



CIGAR CUTTERS 



9712 



WANTED: HENCKELL cigar_ cutters 

box openers 

5504. 



wine and cigar 
Howie 305-534-4757, fax 305-538- 



C0LLECTI0NS 



9720 



CANADIAN ESTATE Sale- Puma, Gerber, Buck and 
Swiss Army knives from 1970*3, new in box, For price 
lists phone 905-883-6304 or fax 905-883-4292. 
For picture catalog, send $2 (per brand) to: G. Kettles, 
Box 170, Unit 35B, 10520 Yonge Street, Richmond 
Hill, Ontario, Canada L4C 3C7, 

CASH BUYER. Collections' individual pieces. Case, 
Randall, Remington, name it. Sensitive to estate^ 
private situations. Call/ send list. Uncomfortable? 
References available. Dwight Long, Rt. 1 Box 30-B- 
3, Grandview, TX 76050, 817-645-2652. 

CUSTOM FOLDER collection for sale known makers 
send SASE or call. Charlie Hobbs, PO Bo* 625, 
Seymour, TN 37865. 423-577-2005. 

CUSTOM KNIFE collection for sale, whole or in part. 
Folders and sheath knives. Free knife list. Bob 
Cantliffe, 5719 South lake Dr.. Greensboro, NO 
27410. 910-299-0917. 

25 FIXED, folders, custom, and production. Send 
SASE and $3 or fax for list and photos. Otto Fal, 
8835 S. Ridgeland, Oak Lawn, IL 60453. 708-599- 
7515. 

JUNE 98 



EXOTIC HARDWOOD knife scales and blocks, clear 
solid wood blanks, free price list. Send SASE to: 
Don's, HC 70, Box 3321, Sahuarita, AZ 85629. 520- 
625-5067. 

STAGALIZED HARDWOOD, curly maple, birdseye 
and hard maple. Scales or sticks in 7 colors. 
Satisfaction guaranteed. Call Howard English after 
5pm Eastern 814-857-5088. 

WILD WOODS the World's Source for Color 
Impregnated knile handle woods. Burls and Curly 
Maple in stock. Please call for your free brochure. 
Wild Woods 419-866-0435, 



HEAT TREATING 



9780 



HEAT TREATING/ oil hardening zone and clay 
tempering - all steels. Bearclaw Knives, PO Box 
1391, La Porte, TX 77572-1391. Call for prices. 
713-752-1258. 



KNIFE CASES/ DISPLAYS 



9800 



ALL CASES assembled with brass hardware, mitered 
joints and doweled for extra strength. Made from hand 
selected walnut, oak, or other hardwood. Hand 
stained and satin finished. Standard sizes: 6x9, 9x12, 
12x18, 18x24, Flag, gun, sword and other custom 
cases available. Paul c/o Veteran's Display Cases, 1- 
888-9VETCAS. 



DISPLAY CASES in oak, cherry, walnut. Many sizes 
starting at 5x10x2, $13. Custom made knife, sword 
and pistol cases. Color brochure $2. D&M 
Woodcrafts, 5363 Oakwood Dr., N. Tonawanda, NY 
14120. 800-498-7820. 



KNIFE CLUBS/ SOCIETIES 9810 

RANDALL COLLECTORS: The Randall Knife Club 
now has over 2,000 members and was formed with 
the approval of Randall Made Knives, Orlando. Your 
dues buys quarterly newsletter, classified ads, current 
news about Randalls and more. Send $15 yearly dues 
to: The Randall Knife Society Inc., PO Box 539, 
Rosetand, FL 32957. 



KN1FEMAKING EQUIPMENT 9840 

KNIFE MAKERS slide rule, determine the height of 
the max. grind for a given wheel diameter and steel 
thickness, $15,50 including postage. Keep your ears 
clean! Grinding hoods, $10 plus postage. Shop One. 
32520 Michigan Si, Acton, CA 93510. 

PARAGRAVE SYSTEM for sale. Works great, extra 
tips and lots of videos. Like new, $575. Rick 937- 
548-9335. 



KNIFEMAKING INSTRUCTION 9850 



KNIFE FORGING Classes (2 day continuing 
workshop) learn traditional knifemaking with forge, 
anvil and hammer. Make your own knife with new, 
modern tool steel. All materials provided. Cost $250 
per person, 707-823-4057, Karl Schroen, 4042 
Bones Road, Sebastopol, CA 95472. 

KNIFEMAKING LESSONS beginner or increase skill & 
speed. In great area tor family trip between Cincinatti 
and Indianapolis. 18 years full time, Guild member. 
Ken Largin Ketgin Knives! 1 day $250, 3 day $500. 
Satisfaction Guaranteed, 765-647-0003. 

BLADE/ 91 



WHAT'S NEW 



J 



Martin Offers A- 2 
Tool Steel Chisel Point 

J. Martin's chisel point sports an 

'A-2 blade and an epoxy-impreg- 

lated nylon handle over ray skin. 

For more information contact R.J. 

Martin. Dept. BL. L477 Country Club RcL 

Middletown. CT 06457 (860) 347-1161. 



Remington's In Safe 
With Seat Belt Hook 




Ti 
c 



he Two-Blade One-Hander by 
Remington Arms incorporates two 
one-hand blades, including a 3 3/4- 
inch hook blade for rapid seat bell cutting. 
For more information contact 
Remington Arms Co.. Inc., attn: Linda 
Blackburn, Dept. BL. 870 Remington 
Dr., Madison, NC 27025 (910) 548-8581. 




Browning Adds Hide 
Cutter To Kodiak Line 

The Browning Model 308 features 
two 440-C drop-point and hide- 
cutting blades and a Zytel® handle. 
For more information contact Brown- 
ing, attn: Travis Hall, Dept, BL. One 
Browning PI., Morgan, UT 84050 (801) 
876-2711. 




KNIFEMAKING SUPPLIES 



9875 KNIFEMAKING SUPPLIES 



9875 KNIFE SHOPS 



9890 



AAA IRONWOOD Birdseye scales. 9/16xl-l/2"x5' ! , 
the best. $15 ppd, three sets $50 ppd. Hillary 
Diamond, 4160 N. Scottsdale Rd., Scottsdale, AZ 
85251, 602-994-5752, FAX 602-994-3680. Visa, 
Am Ex. MC, Discover. 

ANCIENT IVORY Far Sale: Both fossil walrus and 
mammoth. Exceptional colors including blues and 
greens. Fantastic for knife handles, scrimshaw and 
carving. Rick B, Fields, 26401 Sandwich Place, Mt. 
Plymouth, FL 32776. Phone/ Fax 352-383-6270. 

FOLDER SUPPLIES: Stainless screws taps, threaded 
pivot pins. IBS Int.. R.B. Johnson, Box 11, 
Clearwater, MN 55320. 320-558-6128. 

FOSSIL IVORY, Oosik, fossil bone. Send $2 for price 
list. April through October: Box 350, Ester, Alaska 
99725. November through March: Roland Quimby, 
Box 3175-RB, Casa Grande, Arizona 85222. Roland 
907-479-9335. 

IVORY LEGAL African elephant sold in full tusks or 
sections. Alan Zanotti, 20 Braunecker Rd., Plymouth. 
MA 02360. 508-746-8552. 

IVORY PRE-BAN African elephant sold in slabs, tusk 
sections, and whole tusks. Warther Museum, 
Sugarcreek. OH 330-852-3455. 

KNIFE TRAINING- use and defense, realistic knife 
training. Two day basic and intermediate classes. 
June 13 & 14, 1998, October 17 & 18, 1998. 
Classes in Ohio or at your school. Knives and knife 
sharpeners for sale. Renott Training & Supplies, call or 
fax; 937-236-7234 or write at: 7237 Serpentine Dr, 
Dayton, OH 45424, or e-mail at: renottfii aol.com 
MC/Visa, 

MAN K EL'S 130# shop anvils. Natural gas or propane 
fired shop forges. Tongs and hammers, Good used trip 
hammers. Call for prices. Mankel 616-874-6955. 

MOOSE, DEER, elk antlers. Whole racks, slabs, 
scales, also crowns for scrimshaw and carvings, 
appro);. $5/lb. Also various exotic woods, will mail 
photos, G. Dmowski. Box 1464, Belle River, OM, 
Canada NOR 1A0. 519-728-3232. 

92 / BLADE 



STEEL TANG Stamps: Mark your knives with your 
name, logo or design. Quality hand-cut hardened steel 
stamps made to your specifications. "If it's worth 
making, it's worth marking." Established 1898. Henry 
A. Evers, Corp. 72 Oxford St., Providence, Rl 02905. 
401-781-4767. 

TITANIUM 6AL4V, 020 to 125, $30 per pound. Can 
cut to your sizes. Dealer discounts, Jim 619-448- 
2799. 



TRADER BILL'S Knife Shop, Balisong, Buck, Cold 
Steel, DMT, Gerber, Kershaw, Leatherman, Spec Plus, 
Spyderco, United. Zippo. Fantasy, combat, historical, 
utility. Special ordering available. 20-50% off, 4005 
Pio Mono Plaza. Macon, GA 31206. 912-781-2482. 
1-75 exit 49. 



LEATHER/ SHEATHS 



9900 



KNIFE SHOPS 



9890 



ARIZONA KNIFE Source, Quality custom, production, 
and collectables for less. Around the world or in 
Phoenix, we're best, find out why. 888-86KN1FE or 
www.azknife.com 

COLLECTIBLES AND new knives for sale. Usually we 

buy a collection of old knives monthly, mostly Case, 
also other brands. Sell new Case, Boker, Gerber, 
Puma, HSiR, Fighting Roosters. Founding member 
NKCA. Been in business 1950, Robert Werner Co., 
209 4th St. SW, Cullman, AL 35055. 205-734- 
5291. 

KNIFE TRAINING- use and defense, realistic knife 
training. Two day basic and intermediate classes. 
June 13 & 14, 1993, October 17 & 18, 1998. 
Classes in Ohio or at your school. Knives and knife 
sharpeners for sale. Renott Training & Supplies, call or 
tax: 937-236-7234 or write at: 7237 Serpentine Dr, 
Dayton, OH 45424, or e-mail at: renott(«aol.com 
MC/Visa. 

"SCOTTSDALE ARIZONA" opening June. 5500' 
custom knife store, 4160 N, Scottsdale Rd„ 
Scottsdale, AZ 85251. 602-994-5752, Buy, sell, 
trade. 

SHARP STUFF. Be sure to visit Arizona's largest retail 
shop for antique and custom knives, if you ever get to 
Tucson. Sharp Stuff is a full cutlery shop. We buy, 
sell, and trade in the shop or at shows only. 3655 
North Campbell Ave. at Prince. 520-881-0327. 



CUSTOM LEATHER knife sheaths in your design or 
mine. Write or call: Robert Schrap, 7024 W. Wells 
St.. Wauwatosa. Wl 53213. 414-771-6472 

evenings 

TOUGH HANDSEWN sheaths, built to be used, 
custom fitted to your knife. Holsters too. Dennis 530- 
878-8478. 



REPAIR (KNIFE) 



9945 



KNIFE REPAIR. Blades, tips, modifications, 
restorations, sharpening, serrations. Micarta handle 
upgrades, double-edges, folders to swords. Call Tom 
941-693-1913. 

REPAIR AND restoration, specializing in collectable 
and antique pocket cutlery. Dick 01 sen, PC Box 
2574, Englewood, CO 80150. Dick 303-762-9866, 

SERVICES, MISCELLANEOUS 9980 

CUSTOM STABILIZATION: Full acrylic impregnation 
of wood, ivory bone. etc. We also dye: 8 colors 
available with new "no smell" formula. Wood 
Stabilizing Specialists Inc. 800-301-9774. 

CUSTOM STABILIZATION: Full acrylic impregnation 
of wood, ivory, bone, etc. We sell wood handle 
material. We also dye; 8 colore available with new 
"No Smell" formula. New lower rates available. Wood 
Stabilizing Specialists, Inc. 800-301-9774. Visit us at 
our website: http://www.waterloowood.com 

FILEWORK, STRAIGHT or folders five years 
experience on major brand knives, send $2 for 
information and pictures. Fancywork, 228 Park Ave., 
Woodstock, GA 30188. Tom 770-592-0554. 

JUNE 98 



Choose The Market Leaders 




THE WORLD'S #1 KNIFE PUBLICATION 



• The First Knife Magazine - Publishing Leadership Since 1973 

• Founder of the Internationally Famous BLADE Show 

• Producers of the California Custom Knife Show/Blade Show West 

• Founder of the Cutlery Hall-Of-Fame® 

• Founder of the BLADE® Magazine Knife-of-the-Year® Awards 

• Founder of the American Blade Collectors Association (ABC A) 

• Founder of the International Blade Collectors Association (IBCA) 

• Official Masazine of the Knifemaker's Guild 

• Total Editorial Page Leader 

• Total Advertising Page Leader 

• Knife Industry's Book Publishing Leader 




Associate Publisher - Tom Paar- ext. 549 
Advertising Mgr. - Steve McCowen - exi. 827 
Advertising Sales - Luci Stone - (423)877-7 1 10 



Publisher of Knives '98, Gun Digest and 50 More Great DBI Books! 
The ONLY Monthly Knife Magazine 

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mm 

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70,000 total paid readers with $83,985 average annual incomes 

Gun List readers spent $5,426 each last year on their gun hobby 

Gun List readers purchased more than 1,167,000 guns 

74.5% of Gun List readers are reloaders 

Average Gun List readers attend 6.90 gun shows per year. 91 .4% of Gun List readers 

attended one or more shows 






Your quarterly guide to collector gun shows nationwide 



Associate Publisher 

Tom Paar -ext.549 
Advertising Sales 

Dave Beauchaine - ext.408 
Randy Augustinak - ext. 780 
Ted Witlems - ext, 406 
Bruce Wolberg - ext. 403 
Jim Slow -ext. 809 



The ONLY complete, fully indexed gun and knife show calendar 
Krause Publications 



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SERVICES, MISCELLANEOUS 9980 MISCELLANEOUS PRODUCTS 9996 MISCELLANEOUS PRODUCTS 9996 



KNIFE REPAIR and restoration (pocket, skinning, 
lighting, etc.) Johnny, 1766 Camino Sierra. 
Bakersfield, CA 93306. 805-872-1785. (Ka-8ar 
authorized repair man), 

MISCELLANEOUS PRODUCTS 9996 

CHAIN MAIL Armor. Do it yourself! It's easy] For 
detailed instructions, send $5 and SASE. Art 
DeForest, PO Bon 9067, Grand Jet., CO 81501. 

CIGARS AND Premium Quality Custom Pipe 
Tobacco!!! Free Catalog: VSOP Tobacco & Gifts, POB 
1335. Agoura Hills, CA 91376-1335. 



FLINT KNAPPING materials, tools, flints, pipestones, 
learning aids, books, videos, complete starter kit. 
White River Supply. PO Box 460653, Aurora, CO 
80046. Call for free pricelist. 800-248-2309, 

FOR SALE; Huge selection! Antlers (deer, elk, 
moose), claws, skulls, bones, tanned fur, leather, 
buckskin, sinew, etc. Moscow Hide and Fur. On-Line 
Catalog: http://www.hideandfur.com 

FREE INFO. Slip joints, lockers, autos. Build your 
own from my designs, SASE to: Art Stagnitta, 4857 
So, Foil St., Depl. BL, Englewood, CO 80110. 



IVORY, SCRIMSHAW, furs, skulls! Legal: Scrimshaw, 
carvings, elephant tusks, walrus, hippo, warthog, 
mammoth ivory, oosik. Netsuke, Eskimo artifacts, 
pistol grips, buckles, jewelry, raw ivory for 
knifemakers & artists, fur rugs, horns, old trade beads, 
etc. Informative, illustrated catalog mail- SI or call 1- 
800-423-1945! Boone Trading Company, 562IBD) 
Coyote Rd., Brinnon, WA 98320. 

WANTED: NORMARK/ Martmni hand forged knives, 
top prices paid. Paul 630-789-7086. 

ZIPPO LIGHTERS, buy, sell, trade. Send SASE, free 
list, Jim Denton, PO Bon 460213, San Antonio, TX 
78246. PH/FAX: 210-377-2177. 



ADVERTISERS' INDEX 



A & J Enterprises 55,78 

A.G. Russell Knives, Inc. ...73 

ABC Direct 72 

Action Performance 31 

American Bladesmith Society 

72 

Americana Ltd 77 

Arizona Custom Knives 98 

Aumann Auction 80 

B 

Barrett-Smythe Galleries 

101 

Bear MGC Cutlery 35 

Beck's Cutlery & Specialities 

80 

Benchmade Knife Co 23 

Bergland, Eric 78 

Bladens Knife & Tool 70 

Blanchard's Fine Cutlery ...70 
Blue Mountain Turquoise ..65 

Blue Ridge Knives 43, 71 

Bob-Sky Knives 82 

BokerUSA 15 

Boye Knives 80 

Brend Handmade Knives ..77 

BriarCustom Knives 39 

Burke, Dan 78 



C.A.S. Iberia 

Canadian Knifemakers 



..116 
Guild 
....82 



Capdepon, Robert 78 

Centaur Forge Ltd 45 

Chris Reeve Knives 79 

Coast Cutlery Co 35 

Cobra Imports Ltd, Inc 73 

Coleman, Keith 74 

Columbia River Ill, 113 

Custom Knife Company ..101 
Cutlery Specialists 59 



Denton, J 77 



Edge Design Inc 69 

Edgecraft Corporation 52 



Elishewitz Custom Knives 



Emerson Knives 



Lansky Sharpeners 69 

_71 Lile Handmade Knives ....106 
„73 Lohman Company 79 

Lone Star Wholesale 75 



Finer Points 81 

Fowler, Ed 74 

Fowler Custom Knives 80 

Franklin, Mike 81 

Franklin Mint 17 

G 
G.L. Pearce Abrasive Co ....75 

Gallagher Knife & Photo ..102 54 

Gaston, Ron 76 Meyerco 60 



Magnum USA 52 

Masecraft Supplies 75 

Matthews Cutlery 71 

McDonald, RJ 71 

McDonald, Rich 79 

McGowan Manufacturing Co 



Gerber Legendary Blades ,.27 

Gigand Company Ltd 5 

Gilbreath, Randall 76 

GlendoCorp 79 

GT Knives 109 

H 

Hagen Doc 76 

Halpern Titanium 77 

Harper Ma n ufactu ri ng 70 

Himalayan Imports 82 

Horsehead Creek Knives ...80 

I 

Ironstone 52 

J 

Jantz Supply 26 

Jensen, John 72 

Johnson, Ruff in 70 

Joy Enterprises 113 

JT's Knife Shop 78 

Junglee-GKT 5,8,9 

K 

Katz Knives 45 

Kershaw Knives 7 

Kinnikin, Todd 76 

Kiotzli Burgdorf 54 

Knife & Gun Finishing Supply 

63 

Knifemakers Guild Show ...37 

Knives of Alaska 64 

Koval Knives & Supplies ....75 
Kris Cutlery 75 



Miami Machete Works .,..101 
Mission Knives & Tools ...101 
Moteng International Inc 

11,33 

Mother of Pearl Company 

65 

Muir& McDonald 106 

N 
National Knife Distributor ..71 

Natural Products 54 

NC Tool Company 76 

Nealy.Bud 76 

Newsletter 80 

Noble Collection 19 

Nordic Knives ,., 53,108 

Northeast Cutlery Collector 
72 



Outdoor Edge Cutlery Corp 

107,109 

P 

Paragon Cutlery Co Inc 30 

Paragon Industries 39 

Paragon Sporting Goods Co 

Inc 98 

Parkers' Knife Collector Serv 

40,110 

Patrick Custom Knives 81 

Perkins, Sean 76 

Plaza Cutlery 77 

Pro-Cut 16 

Pullen, Martin 73 



Randall Made Knives 82 

Razor Edge Systems Inc ....32 

Reba's Enterprises 77 

Red Hill Corporation 78 

RFG Safe And Knife 98 

RogerGamble 70 

Rosehips Folk Art Gallery ..78 



Serpan,Greg 79 

Seto Cutlery ..80 

Sheffield Knifemaker Supply 

74 

Shepherd Hills Walnut 2 

Skyiands Cutlery 98 

SOG Specialty Knives Inc ..63 
Southeastern Custom Knife 

Show 70 

Spyderco 3, 59 

Swisstech 43 

Szilaski, Joseph 73 



Texas Knifemakers Supply 

110 

Trans World Alloys 60 

Treestump Leather 75 

Tru-Grit 81 

Tru-Hone Corporation 79 

U 

Ultra Speed Productions ...76 

United Cutlery 25 

Utica Cutlery 107 



Vagnino, Michael 75 

VoylesJBruce 108 

W 

W.R. Case & Sons Cutlery Co 

115 

Watts, Wally 73 

William Henry Knives Ill 

Willy B's Custom Sticks/ Picks 

73 

World of Weapons 74 



The advertisers' index is provided as a reader service. Occasional last minute changes may result in ads appearing on pages other than those listed here. 

The publisher assumes no liability for omissions or errors. 



94/ BLADE 



June 98 



WHERE TO GET 'EM 



NEW W FACTORY K MV'r.jS 

Bear M<;t'. una: K. (mlt'ei. flcpt Ml . Mil Dt^ir Blvd.. 
Jacksonville, AL 36265 (2WI 435-S27; Hcnchmadc USA. 
aim: L. dc Asfe, Dept, BL. 300 BuivtrcFt.-i.-k Rd.. O rep in 
C'ily. OR J7045 (5113) 655-6004: lllun Mountain 
Turuauiso, atln: M Kiccilvllt. Dcpl. BL. I'OB 112. 
Quemado, NM K7s:<> (SOS) 533-6329; Buktr USA. altn: C. 
Hoffman, Dept, BL. I, 551) Balsam Si.. Lakuwoud. CO 
N02JS 1303) 4f>MIM>3; Bru»nin K , mm: I". Hull, Dept. BL, 
Rt. I. Mur S an, IJT 84050 (KIK1) 333-32HK; Buck, aim; D. 
Ciarvick. Dept BL. ROB 1267. El C'iijiw. CA 921)22 (fil9) 
449-11110; Camillus, alln: J. LaJlahian.i, Depl. BL. 54 
Main, Camillus. NY 1303) (800) 344-045*5 Case, alln: J. 
Sullivan, Dept. BL. Owens Way. Bradford. PA 16701 
(SI 4) 3(iS-4123: Columbia River' Knife & Tool, alln: R. 
Bremer. Dcjii. BL. 9720 SW Hi II man. Suite HI 15, Wilson- 
ville OR 97II7II (5113! hS5-5(U5: Edits Design, Inc/LDI. 
altn: W. Ferinell. Depl. BL.WI3 W. Mtinnte. Ariumiinl. IL 
(>24l I (618) 483-3343; GATCO/Tlmbcrihie, altn: J. 
Anihiin. Depl. BL. i'OB MM, {let/ville. NY l4llnN-0W)() 
(716) 877-2200? (icrhcr. altn; D. Hulehens. Dept. BL, 
I421X) SW 72nd. h >n land, OR 972KI-3I1KS (5(13) fi39-filfi1; 
<..iilin:iiui alln: S. Baliilia. Dept BL. FOB 2219. Bdlinu- 
ham. WA 98227 (3«D 656-9141; Ka-B»r. Mitt [>. HiHejas. 
Dept BL. 1125 E, Statu. Glean, NY I -1761) (MIX)) 2824)130: 
Ktttz, alio: K. Derkaiz, Dept, BL. POB 738, Chandler, AZ 
Ji5224-07.il i 1 602) 7Hh- ')334; Kills m attic J. Kcllofcoski. 
Dept BL, 479 Greynolck. I.anuina. EL 33462 (561) 5NK- 
31X5; Leulhermun Tirol, atln: M Baker. Dcpt. BL. 12106 
NE Airiswi>rih. Portland. OR 97220 (503) 253-7826: Mad 
l)(ij> Knives, aim: K. Medline. Depl. BL. KJ33 Pecos Dr. 
14. PreKOM Valley, AZ 86314 (521!) 772-3021: Meyereo. 
alln: B, Mever. Dcpt BL. 3920 S. Wall on Walker. Dallas. 
IX 75236 (214) 333-2111; Al Mar Knives, alln: G. 
Fadden, Depl, BL. 5755 SW Jean.Sie. 11)1, Lake Oswego. 
OR 970.15 1503) 635-922'): Micro-Tech, alln: A. Marfiiinc. 
Dcpt. BL. 932 3fith ("I. SW, Vera Beach. PL 329dM (561) 
569-3038; Queen, aim: J. Wvllie, Depl. BL. I'OB 145, 
Franklinvillc. NY 14737 (716)676-5527: Round Kyc Knife 
& Tuol, aim: C. Monlero, POB SIK.Saele. ID MUM) (208) 
265-NX5ti: SO(; Specialty Knives, alln: R Anderson. Dcpl. 
BL. POB 11124. Edmonds. WA 98020 (206) 771-62311: 
Santa tc Stoneworks, aim: J. Iverson. Dept. BL, 37911 



Cenilloj. Santa Fc. NM K7505 (51)5) 471-3953; Sehrudc. 
atln: J. Hufnagel, Dcpl. BL. 7 Schrade, Ellenvdle. NY 
1242H (914) 647-761X1: Sebtrtech. altn: B. Sehe-r. Depl Bl . 
M30 l.urline, Chalsworth, CA 91311 (H18) 718-4803: 
Sniiih & Wesson, c/o Taylor Cutlery, alln: S. Taylor, 
Depl. BL. POB 1638. KtngspOTL TN 37662 (423) 247- 
241)6; Spyderco. aim: J. Lailuri, Dcpl. BL, POB BOO, 
Golden, CO 8041)2-0800 (303) 279-S383; Swiss Army 
Hrunds. alln: J. Turner, Dcpt. BL. One Rcse;ircii Dr 
She I ion, CT 06484 (203) 944-2359; StvissTcch. aim T. 
Brunofsky. Depl. BL. 8613 East Menlor, OH 44060 (800) 
■M4-K799; Untied Cullery, alln: K. Rae, Dcpl, BL. 1425 
United, Sevierville. TN 37862 (615) 428-2532; Ulica, alln: 
R. Juswick, Dept. BL. 820 Noyes. Utica. NY 13503 (315) 
733-466.1; Wenger, c/o Precise Illti-rltatiuiial. [iltn: J. Jans- 
ehulz. Dept. BL. 15 Corporate, Orangeburg, NY 10962 
(800) 431 -2996 

MARRIED TO THE STEEL AND EACH OTHF . R 
Hatch and Judy Beaver. Dcpl. BL, 48835 N. 25, Phoenix, 
AZ 85027 (602) 465-7831: D 1 and Put Holder. Depl. BL. 
7148 W. C'ounirv Gables. Peoria, AZ 85381 (602) N7K- 
3064; Peter and Diane Martin. 28220 North Lake Dr., 
Waicrford. Wl 53185 (414) 662-3629; K.J. and Bene 
McDonald, Depl. BL, 1473061 Coon N. Loxahalchec, PL 
31470 (5ftl) 790-1470: Jim and Joyce M in nick. Depl. BL, 
1 44 North Tttt, Middlclown. IN 47356 (317) 354-4108; 
Chuck and Belle Ochs, Depl. BL. 1 24 Emerald. Largo. Fl. 
33771 (SI3) 536-3827; Cliff and Trena Polk, Depl. BL. 
4625 Webber Creek. Van Buren. AR 7245h (501) 474- 
3828; George and Karen Walker. Dept BL. Star Route. 
Alpine. WY 83I2S (307) 883-2372: Michael and Patricia 
Walker, Dept. BL. 2V25 Powell, Eugene, OR 97405 (541) 
465-5625: Buster and Julie Warenski. Depl. BL. POB 214. 
Richfield. UT 84701 (KOI) 896- 531 9: and Errol and Mary 
Young. Depl. BL. 4826 Storey Land, Alton. IL 62002 
(618) 466-4707 

PJiRl-l-(T CARRY FOLDER 

Rnhert Capdepon. Dept. BL, 829 Vatican. C arenero, LA 
7052(1 (318) 896-8753: Coast Cutlery, alln: N. Morgan. 
Dept. BL. POB 5S21. Portland. OR 97214 (MX!) 426-5858: 
Katz, aim: K. Derkalz, Depl. BL. POB 730. Chandler. AZ 



85224-0730 (602) 786-9,134: Kershaw, alln; D. Becker. 
Depl. BI„ 2531)11 SW Parkway, Wilsonville. OR 97(1711 
(503) 6X2-1966; Ken Onion Dcpl. BL. 91-990 Oaniani. 
Kapolei. HI 967117 (mix) 674-1300; Spvderco. alln: J, 
Lailuri. Dept. BL. POB 800. Golden. CO 80402-0800 
(303) 279-8383: Welly Walts, Dept. BL. 9S6fl Hwv. 36. 
Gatesville. TX 7652X (817) 487-2X66; William Henry 
Knives, alln: M. Conahle, Depl, BL. 3(1 J an is Way. Ste. A. 
Scot Is Valley. CA 95066 (408)461 -Oft I I 

WHICH CARBON FOR WHICH CUHEB2 
James Unison. Dept. BL. 1 76 Brentwood, Madison. AL 
35758 (205) 971-6860: Kevin Ca-shcn. Dcpt, BL. 5ft 15 
Tvler St. tluhhaidsion. MI 4XX45 (517) 9S167M0; Jcrrv 
Fisk. Dcpl. BL. 157 N. Park Ave.. Lockcshure. AR 71X4h 
(870) 289.3240: Ed Fowler. Dcpl. BL. 1672 N. Sniillt Rd , 
Riverioo. WY 82501 (307) 856*9815: Tim Hancock. Dept. 
BL. 10805 N. X3rd St.. Scotisdale. AZ N52ftl) (61)2) 99X- 
KK49; Red St, Cvr. Depl. BL. 1218 Cary Ave., Wilminalon. 
CA 90744 (310) 5IX-9525; J.D. Smith, Dcpl, BL. 5f6 E. 
2nd St., 1138. South Boston. MA 112)27 (hi 7) 2d9.|f)99 

BLADES IN BLAC K 

Benchmadc Knife Co.. aim: VI. Mc Willis. Depl. BL. 300 
Beav ere reek Rd.. Oleeoil ( in . OR 97045 (50.1) r.55.60114; 
Bokcr USA, Inc.. al'tn: C. Hoffman, Depl. BL. (550 
Balsam St. Lakewood. CO 80215 (303) 462-0662; Rnovn- 
iac. alln: T. Hall, Depl. BL. Rt. I. Morgan, I 1 '! 841150 
(800) 234-21145: Buck Knives, aim: R. Morgan, Dept BL. 
POB 1267. lit Cajoit. CA 92112(1 (800) 32f>-2825: Berber 
Legendary Blades, alln: D. HlHetiens, Depl. BL. 1 42110 
S.W 72nd Ave . POB 23088. Porlland. OB 97223 (505) 
63945161: < oilman ii Cutlcrv. Inc.. atln: Shira/ Bak>1ia. 
Depl. BL. mil 20ft l ). Belliii S harn. WA 98227 (360) 738- 
4901; Ka-Bar Knives, Inc. alln: D. Hillegns. Depl. BL. 
1 125 E. Slale St. Olean. NY 14760 (800) 282-013(1; Mucla. 
c/u C.A„S. Iberiu, Inc.. atln: B Ross. Depl. BL, 650 Indus- 
trial Blvd.. Sale Creek. TN 37.173 (800) 635-9366: SOG 
Specially Knives, Inc.. aim: R. Anderson. POB 1024, 
Edmonds, WA 98020(425) 771-6230; Spyderco, Inc.. altn: 
J. Lailuri. Depl. BL. POB 8(X). Golden.' CO XIJ402 (X(KI) 
525-7771): United Cutlery, altn: K. Rae. Depl. B L. 1425 
United Blvd.. Sevierville, TN 37876(81X1) 548-0835 PjL-VDE 



S *Tl NETWORK OF 
c ollectit.ne t CLASSIFIEDS! 



IF YOU COLLECT IT - YOU'LL FIND IT 



4 EASY OPTIONS TO REACH THE MOST ACTIVE KNIFE 
COLLECTORS FOR ONLY 400 PER WORD! 



S 




By Internet: Visit www.collectit.net 

* on the Internet to order with your credit 
card. 

By Mail: Complete order form below, 
send payment by check, money order or 
credrt card, mail to: BLADE, CLASSIFIE 
ADVERTISING DEPT., 700 E. State St., 
lola, Wl 54990. 




By Fax: Complete order form below, 
include your credit card number, Fax to 
7154454087. 

By Phone: Call 1-800-942-0673, 

7am-7pm M-F. Please have your credit 
card number & expiration date ready 



BLADE CLASS ADVERTISING • 700 East State Street, 

lola,WI 54990-0001 Ph: 715-445-2214* Fax: 715-445-4087* 

Website: httpy/WwvV,collectit.net 




LADE 



THE WORLD'S #1 KNIFE PUBLICATION 



JUNE 98 



BLADE/ 95 



Note: Shows marked with an asterisk f*J have knives as the main exhibited item. 



MARCH 



March 27-29 Janesville, WI I5lh Badger Ruhr 
Show. Coniact Bob Schrap, Dept. BL, POB 
511. Elm Grove, WI 53122 (414) 479-9765.* 

March 27-29 Cincinnati, OH Greater Cincin- 
nati Spring Knife Show. Contact NKCA busi- 
ness office, a tin: Lisa Broyles. Dept. BL, POB 
211171). Chattanooga. TN 37424 (800) 548- 
3907.* 



APRIL 



April 3-5 Harrisonburg, VA Shenandoah 
Valley Knife Show. Contact Edmund David- 
son (540) 997-5651.* 

April 4-5 Kokomo, IN 2nd Annual Kokomo 
Indiana Knife Show, Contact the show c/o 
Dept, BL. 5806 Arrowhead. Kokomo, IN 
46902 or call Dave Bohmer (765) 628-7852,* 

April 4-5 Eugene, OR Oregon Knife Show. 
Contact the show c/o Dept. BL, POB 2091, 
Eugene, OR 97402 (541) 484-5564.* 

April 4-5 Tulsa, OK Wanenmacher's Tulsa 
Ciun and Knife Show. Contact Wanen- 
macher's, Tulsa Gun Show, Dept. BL. POB 
33201. Tulsa. OK 74153(918)492-04(11. 

April 17-19 Louisville, KY Louisville Spring 
Knife Show. Contact NKCA business office, 
altn: Lisa Broyles, Dept. BL, POB 21070. 
Chattanooga. TN 37424 (800) 548-3907.* 

April 18-19 Melbourne, Australia Australian 
Knifemakers Guild Custom Knife Expo. 
Contact Anne Bennett (03) 9338 4481 or 
Tasman Kerley (03) 9754 6740.* 

April 18-19 Piano, TX PKA 2nd Annual 
Dallas/Ft. Worth Custom Knife Show. 
Contact Ernie Self (512) 858-7133.* 

April 18-19 Vancouver, Canada 3rd Annual 
Vancouver Knife Show '98. Contact Bob 
Patrick (6(14) 538-6214 fax (604)888-2683.* 

April 19 Marlboro, MA NCCA One-Day 
Show. Contact Joe Hughes, Dept. BL, 771 
Boston Post #179. Marlboro, MA 01752 (508) 
485-3326.* 

April 24-26 Solvang, CA Solvang Custom 
Knife Show, Contact Nordic Knives, altn: 
Dave Harvev. Dept. BL, 1634-C6 Copen- 
hagen. Solvang, CA 93463 (805) 688-3612.* 



MAY 



May 1-3 Monklon, MD Appalachian Knife- 
makers Rende/.vous, Con I act Ted Merchant. 
Dept. BL. 7 Old Garrett. White Hal). MD 
21161 (410)343-1)380,* 

Mav 2 Lapaz, IN Miehiana Knife Collectors 
4th Annual Knife Show. Call Shoe (219) 232- 



1008 or Jeff (2 19) 264-0833.* 

May 9 San Antonio, TX Flint and Steel Knife 
Show, Current 11 LADE® (BCA membership 
cards honored for admission. Contact Ken 
Felty. Dept. BL, 12194 State Hwy. 16 N. 
Helotes, TX 78023-4 1 12 (2 1 (!) 695-8332.* 

May 9-10 Glendale. ML Glendale Gun and 
Knife Show. Contact Jack Williams, Dept. BL, 
POB 82433. Phoenix. AZ 85071 (602) 234- 
5768. 

May 15-17 Greencastle, PA 14th Annual 
Mason Dixon Knife Club Show. Contact 
Ralph Scruton (717) 597-8511 or MDKC, 
Depl. BL. 914 Hykes, Greencastle, PA 
17225.* 



JUNE 



June 5-7 Pigeon Forge, TN Greatest Knife 
Show On Earth XV. Contact Parkers Knife 
Collector Service (8(H)) 247-0599 or (423) 892- 

0448.* 

June 12-14 Atlanta. GA 17lh Annual Blade 
Show & International Cutlery Fair, Cobb 
Gallcria Centre. [-285 & US 41. 'one exil off 1- 
75 across from the Cumberland Mall & adja- 
cent to the Renaissance Wavcrly Hotel. The 
world's largest combined show of handmade, 
antique & factory knives. Nearly 400 tables 
and 65 factory booths. Join Bill Moran. 
Spyderco. Gil Hibben. Buck Knives. Wayne 
Goddard. Bench made LISA. Case and many 
other great national and international makers. 
collectors and knife lovers. Site of the annual 
ABS meeting & special Knifemakers' Guild 
section. Seminars include ABS forging and 
cutting, knife throwing, flintknapping and 
many others. Site of the Blade Magazine 1998 
Knife-Of-The-Year Awards® for factory 
knives, points for the BLADEhandmade'" 
Awards, Blatie Magazine Cutlery Hall-Of- 
Famc® inductions & much more. Contact 
BLADE Magazine®, c/o Krause Publications, 
700 E. State, [ola, WI 54945 (7)5) 445-2214.* 

June 12-14 Indianapolis, IN Indiana Knife 
Collectors Annual Knifefest. Contact 
IKC/Knifefest, Dept, BL, POB 101, Fountain- 
town. IN 46130 or call Frank Phelps (765) 642- 
6313.* 

June 20-21 St. Louts, MO Heart Of America 
Knife Show VI. Contact Mike Helms, Dept. 
BL. 310 Andrews Tl.. St. Peters. MO 63376 
(314)928-5775.* 

June 20-21 Lukeville, CT "the Holley Pocket- 
knife Show. Contact Kerry Ann Keser (860) 
435-2878.* 

June 20-21 Waterbury, CT NCCA (6th 
Annual 2-Dav Show. Contact Russ Philippi, 
Dept. BL, Box 677. Mildale, CT 06437 (860) 
621-7776.* 



JULY 



July 10-12 Springfield, MO NKCA Springfield 
Knife Show, Coniact NKCA business office, 
atln: Lisa Broyles. Dept. BL, POB 21070. 
Chattanooga. TN 37424 (800) 548-3907.* 

July 10-12 Las Vegas, NV The Knifemakers' 
Guild Show. Coniact D' Holder, Dept. BL, 
7148 W. Country Gables. Peoria. AZ 85381 
(602) 878-3064.* 



AUGUST 



Aug. 13-15 Cincinnati, OH Contemporary 
Longrifle Association Show. Contact LRAS, 
atln: G. Barlow, Dept. BL. POB 2097. Staun- 
ton. VA 24402 or call Kim or Rachacl at (540) 
885-3200. 

Aug. 14-16 Lexington, KY Centra) Kentucky 
Knife Club Show. Contact G.T. Williams, 
Dept. BL, POB 55049, Lexington. KY 40555- 
5049(502)863-4919.* 

Aug. 14-16 Aurora, CO PKA 6th Annual 
Denver Custom Knife Show. Contact Don 
Davis (970) 669-9016.* 



SEPTEMBER 



Sept. 5-6 Ft. Smith, AR 2nd Annual Fori 
Smith Knife Show. Contact Morris Herring, 
Dept. BL. POB 85. Dyer. AR 72935 (501) 
997-8861 or Gary Braswell (501) 674-2150.* 

Sept. 11-13 Costa Mesa, CA Blade Show Wesl 
(formerly the California Cuslom Knife Show) 
at the Doubl eTree Hole). Site of the 1998 
BLADEhaudrnadc ™ Awards and more. 
Coniact Krause Publications, atln: C. Williams, 
700 E. Slate, tela, WI 54945 (715) 445-2214.* 

Sept. 12 Graham, TX 8ih Annual Graham 
Knife Show. Contact Harrell Braddock Jr.. 
Dept. BL, 1412 Los Colinos. Graham, TX 
76450 (940) 549-2607.* 

Sept. 12 Lebanon, MO Case Celebration in 
the Ozarks. Contact Shepherd Hills Cutlery 
(888)4CASE-XX.* 

Sept. 12- Ll Winston -Sal em, NC Southeastern 

Custom Knife Show. Contact T. McNahb, 
4015 Brownsboro, Depl, BL, Winslon-Saleni. 
NC 27106 (910) 759-0640.* 

To ensure timely publication of your 
knife show in the "Show Calender," 
BLADE® requests that yott send nil 
pertinent information concerning your 
show in written form—dates, locutions, 
etc. — at least three months before the 
show takes place to Krause Publica- 
tions, atln: J. Kertzman, 700 E. Stale, 
tola, WI 54945 (715) 445-2214 fax 
(715) 445-40H7. BLADE depends on 
the shows themselves for prompt and 
accurate information. BLaBe 



96 / BLADE 



JUNE 98 



Antiquin' 






Return To The Era 
Of Sleek And Cfcic 

The Camillus Streamline — a sleeper 
from the Golden Age of American Cutlery 

M By Barry Carithers 




El 



Indless fields of amber wheat bordered 
I the faded white structures of the old 
IMidwestern county fairgrounds. As I 
made my way around the weed-infested 
horse track, boxes and gallon buckets of 
vintage auto parts busily were being heaped 
on a blanket of blue-and-black tarps. 

My annual trip to the antique auto parts 
swap meet was becoming my sole means for 
replacing the broken and worn-out parts on 
my wife's granddad's '53 Ford two-door. 
Hours were spent leisurely digging through 
dusty boxes of assorted engine parts and 
chrome accessory items in the great search 
for needed replacement parts from the 
Golden Age of Detroit. 

Hours had passed and the sun was high 
overhead as I found myself pawing through 
an overturned hubcap heaped with chrome 
and Bakelite™ knobs and window cranks. 
Lying among this black-and-silver jumbled 
mass was a tarnished but minty looking 
two-blade celluloid jackknife. A quick once 
over and I instinctively knew I had a defi- 



nite pre-World War II piece in my hands. 
Balkingly, the master blade opened to 
reveal a pristine, four- line, Camillus "Sword 
Brand" logo with a beautiful long clip. 
However, the most fascinating part of the 
well-defined blade was the deep, full-length 
etch in bold letters: STREAMLINE. 

A gentleman with a certain likeness to 
Father Christmas gave a muffled chuckle as 
I patiently examined my newest prize. In a 
deep Midwestern drawl he quoted me a 
more-than-fair price for the gem and 
laughed as I inquired how such an interest- 
ing knife should appear in the contents of 
an old Chevy hubcap. He asked if I had a 
few minutes to spare and, handing me an 
old, battered lawn chair, proceeded to tell 
the story of my newly acquired treasure. 

Back To The '30s 

The old man wove a tale of a Depression- 
era Kansas town and a young man whose 
dream it was to acquire the latest in auto- 
mobile artistry — a 1939 Ford Coupe. His 



eventual hard-earned purchase was 
pampered and babied until that day in 1942 
when, reluctantly, it was placed on blocks in 
his parent's large garage. The young man 
packed a small bag and bid a tearful good- 
bye to his folks and boarded a bus for a 
military induction center. Two years had 
passed when his short life came to a close 
on the beaches of Normandy. His parents, 
out of love and respect for their only son, 
refused to allow the car to be moved from 
its resting place in their garage. Years 
passed and though the car never moved, it 
did become home to a number of mice and 
squirrels who took their toll on the car's 
mohair interior. 

In 1989, the old car, along with the 
remainder of the family estate, was sold at 
auction. The old bearded gentleman had 
given the winning bid for the vehicle and in 
turn spent many laborious months restoring 
the car into a prize-winning show vehicle. 
The knife, as he explained, was recovered in 
the deep recesses of the disintegrating 



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Aniiquin' 

driver's seat upholstery. The old gent 
could only presume that the knife had 
been a long-lost possession of that hard- 
working young man. 

That evening, as I carefully cleaned 
and oiled the old piece, the word 
STREAMLINE hauntingly struck a chord 
in my memory. The 1930s, a time of finan- 
cial turmoil and struggle for most Ameri- 
cans, was also the heyday of innovative 
architectural and mechanical streamlining. 
It was a term that was synonymous with 
saving energy and time and whose forms 
are characterized by smooth surfaces and 
rounded edges. The streamlining of the 
1930s also came to symbolize progress and 
the promise of a better future. But was 
there any correlation between streamlin- 
ing and the American cutlery industry of 
the period? 

"Streamlining meant 

smooth surfaces and 

rounded edges." 

Out of the dark days of the Depression 
came a new profession in America — indus- 
trial design. The earliest assignments for 
novice industrial designers was the 
restyling of packaging and products to 
improve sagging sales. The energies of 
these designers led them into hundreds of 
products that needed modernization, 
pocketknives being one of them. 

Among the designers' first efforts in 
the cutlery field were attempts at develop- 
ing more Art Deco-styled knife packaging, 
countertop boards and sales-related items. 
Bright, eye-catching colors, unique letter- 
ing and fluid designs all were incorporated 
into an effort to better attract the 
customer's attention. Knife-related inno- 
vations of the period included tipped 
bolsters, brilliant colors of celluloid scales, 
and an increasing use of serpentine-style 
knife patterns. 

Camillus took full advantage of 
streamlining and, in the late 1930s, intro- 
duced the Sword Brand streamlined jack. 
A full-bolstered serpentine pattern, the 
knife was a tad short of 4 inches long 
closed. All the specimens that this writer 
has ever encountered have the same some- 
what-bowtie-slyle shield. The celluloid 
handle usually tends to display pencil-thin 
streaks of brown running through a pale, 
creamy green. The clip blade with long 
pull boldly announces the jack as the 
Streamline model. 

Discontinued as Camillus went into full 
production for the war effort, the Stream- 
line two-blade jack is a true premium-qual- 
ity piece of superior pre-war construction. 
Fortunate is the knife enthusiast who has 
one of these sleeper collectibles from the 
Golden Age of American Cutlery'- 6l\de 



98 /BLADE 



JUNE 98 



TV Knives 



^ 



Not enough 

Jim Bowie, 

knives or 

historical 

accuracy 

characterize 

this latest 

Alamo vehicle 






i 



ByJ.R. Edmondson 






"Peter Coyote 

never quite rings true 

as Bowie." 



JUNE 98 



M^ v the Texians in Sam Houston ■ 

m1 army swap stories around « blai- 

^^^B ins; i mnpfire. Jim Bowie takes tuti 

his knife and draws site edge a trass a 

whet stone. 

"That's it, ain V it?" voting Son Holland 
asks slowly as lie gapes at the legendary 
blade. 

Bowie extends the knife, handle first. 
When Son seems reluctant, Bowie adds. 
"She won "i bite ya '. " 
Awestruck, Son ttikes the piece anil 
examines it carefully, "i heard stories 
about litis knife, " he says. "I didit 7 
know if it was real or not. " 
"Oh, it's real, all right. " Hugh 
Allison inter feet s. "There are 
plenty of men underground 
can testify to that." 

Mixing Hollywood and 
history usually makes for 
strange bedfellows, and 
Turner Network Televi- 
sion's recent film about two 
prison escapees who join the 
light lor Texas independence. 
Two for Texas, is no excep- 
tion- — but more on the 
movie later. For now. let's 
examine the knife 
presented as Jim Bowie's 
in the Hick. 

As propmaster for the 

TNT production. Byron 

Thomas provided the 

blade prominently 

featured in the film. His 

re utne includes the Texas 



Peter Coyote as Jim Bowie with the 75 
percent replica of the Joe Musso bowie 
made by Steven Rick. ( TNT Two for Texas 
©1997 TBS, Inc., a Time Warner Co. All 
flights Reserved; photo by Erik Heinila) 

BLADE 99 



TV Knives 

frontier miniseries. True Women, Tommy 
Lee Jones' The Good Old Boys, and the 

Xed Blessing western television series. "I 
enjoy period shows the most." he noted. 

After some preliminary research into 
bowies, Thomas presented two patterns to 
the film's director. Rod Hardy. "My prefer- 
ence was for the Searles," Thomas said, 
referring to the knife on display in the 
Alamo that Bowie's brother, Rezin, report- 
edly presented to Henry Fowler sometime 
between I K36-4 1 , However, Hardy selected 
the second pattern based on a knife in the 
collection of Bowie historian Joe Musso, 
Thomas acquired a full-scale replica of the 
Musso bowie from ABS master smith Joe 
Keeslar, but Hardy felt that the knife, with 
its 13 3/4-inch blade, was loo massive. As a 
result, Thomas contacted knifemakcr 
Steven Rick in Cimarron, New Mexico. 

Thomas met Rick years earlier when 
they both worked at the Philmont Scout 
Ranch. Thomas described Rick as a ■typi- 
cal blacksmith— a stout fellow with a long, 
dark beard." 

Rick describes himself as a "low -profile 
knife maker." lie began making blades 
about 13 years ago and employs both [he 
forging and stock-removal processes. 
Mostly he produces utilitarian sheath 
knives for hunters, but he's starting to 
concentrate more on folders. 

When Thomas began working on film 
productions, he contacted Rick to make 
the knives. Rick possesses an extensive 
library of cutlery books. As he recalled, 
"Thomas would call me and say. 'Look on 
page 52."' Rick would then replicate the 
knife pictured on that page. 

Movie knives have become a major side- 
line for Rick. He said he's produced knives 
for Ned Blessing, Tom and 
II tick. The Adventures ^^^^t 

of Huckleberry Finn, ^ j 

and one of the 
Gun smoke 




movies. He favors stock removal for the 
movie knives because he said it's faster. He 
said he's also made pistol grips for Chuck 
Morris in the Walker, Texas Ranger televi- 
sion series. 

"The thing that amazes me about (Rick) 
is that I can send him a prototype of any 
knife and he can turn out a perfect replica 
of it," Thomas observed. He also praised 
Rick for the speed with which he completes 
the knives. 



U 



My preference was 
for the Searles." 

— Thomas Hardy 



For Two for Texas, Thomas sent Rick 
the full-scale replica of the Musso piece 
with instructions to make two knives of the 
design scaled down 25 percent. "I took 4 or 
5 inches off the length." Rick recalled. The 
finished blades measured about 9 inches. 
Rick also made a sheath with a mounted 
throat and tip. 

Big Bowie Scene 

Peter Coyote, who portrays Jim Bowie in 
the movie, must have seemed uniquely 
qualified for the role. Peter had learned 
knife fighting for a 1W] film. Exposure, in 
which he played a modern-day photogra- 
pher drawn into a knife duel. On his first 
day on the set, when he was handed the 
bowie he would carry, Coyote flourished it 
with a grace and skill that would've earned 
the admiration of the real Bowie. 
However, this talent was never used in the 
film. 



Though Two for Texas spotlights the 
bowie in several closeups, the knife sees 
action only once. In the scene, Bowie is 
quizzed as to his proficiency with his knife. 

"Tell me something. Mr. Bowie." asks a 
skeptical Texian. "Are you really as good 
with that knife as people say you are?" 

"I don't know, sir," Bowie replies. 
"Probably not," Bowie then flings the knife 
past the Texian. The blade sticks in a 
wagon, simultaneously severing a rope 
suspending a side of beef. 

Hardy wanted the shot in one take. An 
evening was scheduled lor the sequence. 
The special -effects crew drilled a hole in 
one of the two knives to feed it along a 
guide wire stretching from Bowie to the 
wagon. A bungee cord would propel the 
knife. 

However, problems developed. On one 
attempt the guide wire broke. The knife 
wouldn't stick during other takes. Once, 
the knife hit the steel rim of the wagon 
wheel, breaking the point. Thomas quickly 
rcground it. After more than six hours, I he 
film crew still didn't have the shot, and 
they wrapped for the evening. 

The following night, Howard Schmidt 
resolved the problem. A re-enaelor, 
Schmidt also has appeared In The Trail to 
Abilene, The Postman and local television 
commercials. Like many re -en actors. 
Schmidt enjoys participating in frontier 
rendezvous, where he said he's won several 
knife-and-iomahawk -throwing competi- 
tions. Standing off camera, he threw the 
knife and stuck it in the wagon. 

"I stuck it the first lime," Schmidt 
smiled. "The special -effects man griped 

because 1 was a lfith-of-an-itieh off the 
mark.'" 





49 " 



In the final edited version of the 
sequence, the knife shoots along the invisi- 
ble wire. There's a quick cut of it flashing 
by the face of the skeptical Texian. Then 
there's another quick insert, the one when 
Schmidt threw the knife, of it slicking in 
the wagon. Then the scene returns to the 
master shot as the beef drops to the 
ground (and so does the knife, if you watch 
closely). The whole sequence transpires in 
a second or two. 

In Two for Texas, Hugh Allison (played 
by Kris Kristofferson) recovers Bowie's 
knife from the Alamo and later gives it to 
Son Holland (played by Scott Bairstow). 
In real life. Hardy acquired the undam- 
aged Rick bowie after the end of filming. 
He said, "[ want it," and the movie offi- 
cials gave it to him. 

That's the way they do things in Holly- 
wood. 

Forgetting The Alamo? 

Dozens of motion pictures and television 
productions have portrayed the epic story 
of the Texas revolution in varying degrees 
of inaccuracy. In his book, Alamo Movies, 
film historian Frank Thompson noted: 
"This book — or 10 like it — would not be 
nearly enough space to catalogue the 
Alamo movies' sins against history." Thus, 
the announcement that TNT would 
produce its own version of the saga gener- 
ated considerable enthusiasm among 
Texas history buffs. After all. Turner had 
stressed historical authenticity in such 
productions as Gettysburg and Rough 
Riders. 

"The movie knife 
is the Musso piece 

scaled down 

25 percent.' 



« 



Unfortunately, Two for Texas, which 
premiered on TNT this past Jan. 18. could 
provide Thompson another chapter, or 
perhaps another book, should he choose to 
catalogue this latest film's historical sins. 
The plot tells of two men, a stereotypical, 
crusty geezer named Hugh Allison and an 
innocent youth. Son Holland. Escaping 
from a brutal Louisiana penal farm, they 
take refuge from their relentless pursuers 
by joining Sam Houston's army. 

At Houston's camp. Hugh reunites with 
Bowie, his old drinking and brawling 
buddy from Louisiana. In reality, Bowie 
never could've been at Houston's army 
camp. Houston didn't have an army until 
after Bowie's death at the Alamo. When 
the Alamo siege began on Feb. 23. 1836. 
Houston was in east Texas negotiating a 
treaty of neutrality with the Cherokees. He 
then journeyed to Washington-on-the- 
Brazos to attend the convention that 
declared Texas independence on March 2. 

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BLADE/ 101 




Houston left ihe convention on March 6, 

not knowing the Alamo had fallen that 
very morning. He arrived in Gonzales on 
March 1 1 in assume command of the force 
that had hecn mustering there. It was the 
first lime the commander-in-chief of the 
Texian army actually had an army to 
command. Upon learning of the Alamo's 
defeat, Houston promptly ordered a 
retreat to the east. 
Usuallv an intriguing actor. Covole 



never quite rings true as Bowie. Curiously 
sporting shoulder-length hair, a mustache 
and goatee. Coyote prohably looks less like 
Bowie than any previous actor who's 
played the part. (Mustaches and goatees 
wouldn't become fashionable for another 
decade, yet Son and Santa Anna also wear 
them in this film.) Worse. Coyote imparls 
no depth, no real edge, lo Bowie's charac- 
ter. Insiead. Coyote plays him as a conge- 
nial bumpkin. 



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From left: Peter Coyote as Jim Bowie 
(with his knife sheathed in his belt): 
Kris Kristofferson as Hugh Allison; Sam 
Bail stow as Son Holland; and Tom Skenitt 
as Gen. Sam Houston. (TNT Two for Texas 
©1997 TBS, Inc., a Time Warner Co. All 
Rights Reserved; photo by Andrew Eccles) 



After learning thai ihe Alamo is under 
siege. Hugh and Son ride lo Bowie's aid. 
only to arrive at the Alamo immediately 
after the massacre. Amid the bloody 
carnage ihcy find Bowie's body. Hugh 
lakes Bowie's knife and sticks it in his own 
belt. At least Two for Texas provides a 
new theory lo an age-old mystery: What 
happened lo Bowie's knife after the 
Alamo? 

However, this scene, too. displays the 
screenwriter's historical ignorance. No 
Texians could've ridden into the Alamo 
right after ihe battle because Santa Anna 
lingered there for about a week. Even 
when he marched across Texas in pursuit 
of Houston. Santa Anna left a thousand 
troops stationed at the Alamo. 

After Hugh and Son rejoin the Texian 
army. Houston orders them to locate ihe 
enemy. They find Sanla Anna's army 
backed up against a bend in the San 
Jacinto River. They return in Houston 
and provide him with a crude map. In fact, 
the map bears no resemblance lo the 
historical battlefield at San Jacinto. 
Rather, it's a fairly accurate rendering of 
the movie set on ihe Colorado River in 
the hill country near Austin. 

Historically, the Texian army, not the 
Mexicans, encamped against the river. 
The map even depicts Vince's Bridge on 
the wrong side of ihe Mexican camp. 

As director. Hardy competently executes 
the climactic bailie but it lacks dramatic 
impact, primarily because ihe two prol ag- 
onists aren't involved in the initial fight- 
ing. Instead, Houston has seni them to 
blow up the bridge. Historically, Hous- 
ton's incredible scout. "Deaf" Smith, 
chopped down Vince's Bridge. But Holly- 
wood, of course, wants lo see it blown lo 
smithereens. And. in another dramatic 
failing, because Hugh is absent from the 
battle, Bowie's knife is never allowed lo 
avenge its master. 

The general public no doubi evaluated 
Two for Texas for its entertainment value 
rather lhan its historical accuracy. 
Nonetheless, the movie falls far below 
Turner's previous standards for historical 
integrity. Remember the Alamo but forget 
the history you see in Two for Texas. 

Knifemaker Steven Rick's address: POM 
581, Depi. BL, Cimarron, NM 87714 (505) 
376-2449, 

Editor's note: The author worked as an 
extra in Two for Texas anil was thus able to 
get the inside story on the production and 
the knives used in it, iSTuS! 



102 I BLADE 



JUNE 98 



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"You don't have to turn the knife 
over to engage the lever." 

— Frank Cento fan te -^ 




The latest production 
pieces are ready to cut 




By Steve Shackleford 




Iew foi 'W.'" you probably asked voursclf when you 
lead the kicker lor ihi\ t(Of) "Yeah." yovi no doubt 
continued, hot ;irc they Rl Al I Y M 

OK. ()K! Maybe mm everything herein is revohMJonar) 01 
even ncceixarily new though, in the Webster s MHC, the 
blowing «rr new in th.it they're "of reeeni origin. produc- 
iMin. purchase, etc" Nonetheless latest may he ■ better 
nm>iJ Webster's defines latest as "most reecnl; Current: 

latoi laihions" — became tbc following tio comprise the 

(actors industry's latest la.sb.ioti* 

Enough semantics. One thing's for sure. the '*< production 
models are hi-teeh and cool And here they tome. "yuhnyinj 
down the runway." the latest m factory EatbJottS, leil off by 
some that may or may ivol set trends for the comwj: yt II 
but llien you'll have the final say on A 

S|imK no Si 1 in. I n-k 

'ITie new Hank ("cnlolanle II C54Ki by Spy Jcrco r* designed 
by ( eiitolante. former presiilent ol I he Knifcm.ikers' (iuild. 
and features lite palcnl-pendins; SoaueLock™, the second 
linctloek-^ vafcly to hit the market in the past year- Michael 
Walkei Bad Ron Lake debuted their version, the Interlock .i 
the 1W7 Blade Show, a device that's now used t*i live Oeibct 
Applegalc-Paiitviirn Covert. 




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BLADE 103 



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The Genesis I by Edge Design, Inc. (EDI) features a specially designed clip that enables 
the knife to ride low in the pocket. 



As with the Interlock, the SecureLock 
isn't a lock but a back-up safety mecha- 
nism thai keeps l he line dock from acci- 
dentally disengaging once the blade is 
locked open. The lever for the Secure- 
Lock is on the left side of the knife 
handle, which situates it by the right- 
hand user's thumb for easy access. "You 
don't have to turn the knife over to 
engage the lever," Centofante noted. 
"You fling the blade open and push the 
lever all in one motion, and it's ready to 
go. lis simple but effective." The safety 



itself works off the blade instead of the 
liner and is self-contained in a 125-lhou- 
sandihs-inch-thick space. If engaged 
when the knife is closed, the lever auto- 
matically disengages and is ready to 
engage when vou open l he blade. 

the handle' is G-10. the blade is ATS- 
34 with a Rockwell hardness of 59-61 RC 
and the knife comes in two closed sizes; 4 
inches (the C25G. $129.95 suggested 
retail price, or SRP) and 5 inches (the 
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106 / BLADE 



JUNE 98 



weights: 2-3 ounces. The first 2,000 or 
each length will come wiih a 
Spy derco/ Cen tofante handle medallion 
in gold on black (the succeeding medal- 
lions wil be white on black). As 
MADE® went to press, the knife was 
slated to be available in March or April. 

Camillas C.U.D.A. 

Cam ill us breaks what for it is new 
ground with the C.U.D.A (Camillus 
Ultra Design Advantage). It's the 
company's first real tactical folder but 
what sets it apart is a nifty one- hand- 
opening device, a button you push along 
a channel that locks the blade open in a 
smooth, solid dick-click. Not only is the 
knife fun to operate but the button is 
large enough that, even with gloves on. 
you can open it easily. 

As noted Phil Gibbs, co-designer of 
the device and the company's head of 
new product development, the lock itself 
is nothing mure than a linerlock with an 
ingenious button opener operating it. 
"It's an incredibly simple idea. In my 
opinion, it's the simplest device 
compared to all the current easy-openers 
on the market. It would work on a lock- 
back or a sliplock. The only added part 
is the button. That's what makes il so 
clever," he said. The knife closes like 
any linerlock and. as it does so, the 
button returns to the "parked," or 
closed, position. 

The handle is G-10. the lip-down clip 
and liners are 301 stainless and the 
double-disc-ground blade is ATS-34 
with a bead-blasted finish. The stainless- 
steel button is a melal-injection-molded 
part. The blade works on a bronze bush- 
ing and Teflon® washers. The stainless 
steel fasteners are spline headed. Closed 





'£1%k One Bear of a Knife 



'I have never seen 
m easier, more 
efficient kiltie set 
in my 40 veers ol 
big game hunting." 

— Jim Zumbo 




WARNING: Use of the Kodi-Pak will result in 
lightening fast field dressing, super aggressive saw 
action and shorter skinning times. This is the 
most complete and effective field dressing system 
available. Only serious hunters need apply. 

SEE YOUR LOCAL DEALER 



2888 Bluff Street., #1 30-BM • Boulder, Colorado BO30 I ■ 3 3-652-8212 




The Schrade Teddy Roosevelt knife features 
a stag handle, a 24k-gold blade etch and a 
plaque bearing Roosevelt's image. 




JUNE 98 



BLADE/ 107 



America's Only 

Primarily 

Knife Auctioneers 



W 



RUCE 
OYLES 



AUCTIONEERS 



P.O. Box 22171 

Chattanooga, TN 37422 

Phone 423-894-8319 

Fax 423-892-7254 

E-mail JBruce77@aol.com 

Tcnn. License #4W»0 
TN firm license 4016 
Texas License 12328 



RANDALL & CUSTOM KNIVES 
FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 




RANDALLS SOLD AT RANDALL 
LIST PRICES 

Your satisfaction is guaranteed 
by our return policy 



Send for Catalog - 

Includes color pholos of knives 

wilh descriptive lists 



Catalog prices; 

Custom $3.00 Randall $2.00 
Both for $4.00 

Nordic Knives 

1634-C6 Copenhagen Dr. 

Solvang, CA 93463 U.S.A. 

(805) 688-3612 

or (800) 992-6574 (orders only) 

Knifamakers Guild Associate Member 




The Odyssey is Buck's answer to the manual one-hand market and Wenger's Microtech- 
nician Swiss Army knife offers tools with which to work on computers. 



length: 5 inches. SRP will be about $140 
and the knife reportedly will be available 
in June. 

Mi-Clung Mirage X 

Kevin "Mad Dog" McClung's new 
"corrosion-proof" Mirage X comes in 
four basic models featuring ceramic- 
composite blades thai are reportedly 
harder, denser and much tougher than 
the standard alumina ceramic. "The 
Mirage X blade is second in hardness lo 
a diamond" and has to be measured on 
the Molts scale instead of the Rockwell 
scale. McC'lung observed. As a result, he 
said the only way to sharpen it is with a 
diamond hone, 600- and 1200-grit 
models by EZE-Lap or Norton. 

The 10-inch-overall Mi race X sports a 
1/4-hy-I l/4-by-5 5/S-inch blade with a 
flat grind. Overall weight: 8,4 ounces. 
According to MeClung, though I he 
knife's not a pry bar, its prying ability is 
38 percent and its edge-holding ability is 
about 60X that of his steel knives with 
similar geometry. MeClung said the 
blade handles chopping chores 



108 /BLADE 



extremely well for a ceramic, reportedly 
without chipping. The handle is a glass 
epoxy composite. All models sold to the 
general public are fitted with a metal 
slrip in the handle so the knife will show 
up on metal detectors. 

EDI Genesis 1 

The Genesis I tactical folder is ihe flag- 
ship model of Edge Design. Inc. (HDI). a 
new specialty knife company under the 
direction of Will Fennell. A second- 
generation cutlery man (his father, vete- 
ran knife salesman Wallace Fennell. 
works for Camillus), Will employed the 
design talents of Michael Collins to 
arrive at the Genesis I. 

The knife features an ATS-34 blade 
with a Rockwell hardness of 59-61 RC in 
cither bead- blasted (SI 35 SRP) or lila- 
nium-aluminum-nitride ($155 SRP) 
finishes. The blade, which comes in 
straight or partially serrated edges, oper- 
ates on a bronze bushing with Tell on 
washers. Fennell said the advantage of 
ihe bronze bushing is thai when you 
lighten Ihe pivot pin all the way down it 

JUNE 98 



bottoms out on the hushing and the 
blade won't " freeze," and will continue 
to rotate freely. The handle is G-10 and 
the liners are titanium. Designed for 
ambidextrous use. the Genesis I features 
thumb studs on both sides of the blade 
and a reversible, lip-down clip. Weight: 4 
ounces. 

More Sharp Stuff 

As for your favorite knife companies and 
their latest blades for '98. following are 
capsule summaries in alphabetical order: 

BEAR MGC The new Super Bear 
Jaws tool knife with 17 functions/tools, 
including the 156CS version sporting a 
#10 and #15 Torx and a 3/32 Alfen 
wrench thai fits most scope rinys ($110 
SRP), 

BENCHMADE Two new designs by 
Mel Pardue and one by Allen Elishewitz. 
The Pardue 330 linerlock features a G-10 
handle and no clip. Closed length: 3.4 
inches ($99.95 SRP). The Pardue 350 has 
a Zylel handle and a black clip. Closed 
length: 4.1 inches ($79.95 SRP). The 
Elishewitz 905 Mini Stryker has a G-10 
handle and black clip. Closed length: 4.2 
inches (SRP $119.95). All models come 
with ATS-34 blades (the 330 in a satin 
finish and the 350 and Mini Stryker in 
satin or BT2 finishes) and straight or 
combo edges, 

BLUE MOUNTAIN TURQUOISE 
A pearl-handle version of the Spyderco 
Vtele with pearl on one side only ($300 
SRP). 

BOKER The Orion, a titanium-coaled 
blade with a breathtaking, crystalline 
finish that "sparkles" as you turn the 
knife in your hand ($295 SRP); the Sky 
Walker, a Michael Walker design with 
carbon fiber handles lined with titanium. 
due out in June ($330 SRP): the K.L030. 
designed by German knifemaker Chris- 
tian Wimprf and made by H.P. Klotzli, a 
one-hander with a Teflon -coaled, 
partially serrated, wharncliffe blade and 
a chartreusc-and-black carbon Tiber 
handle ($235 SRP): and the Omega 11, a 
black-blade-black-handle version of the 




At 2 7/8 inches closed. Gutmann's 
Kashmir cigar knife is a combo folding 
knife/cigar cutter with a clothing/money 
clip. 

JUNE 98 





Patents Pending 



One touch of your 

finger on the positive loch button, and 

the Wedge releases Instantly. It's the perfect 

quick access knife for climbing, Whitewater 

rafting, backpacking, hunting and fishing. Conies 

complete with a swivel-clip, cord loop and clothing 

clip for a variety of carry options. 

SEE YOUR 
LOCAL DEALER 

$19.95 Retail 



r CU7VCC/v\ 



OUTDOOR EDGE CUTLERV COUP. • ZOOS Bluff SI. "130-BM ■ Boulder, CO 80301 ■ 303-052-8212 



You asked for it! 

From GrffJV/V£S 




The Easiest 
Opening & Clasi 




Folder Made 

ffiumfflttrd opetr 

a/e - l*ush Button Close 
GT's Guaranteed Precision 

Button Lock Action ■ Solid Brans Button 

Dual Position Hatching (Hip 

Hidden Lanyard Hole 

Blade. ATS-S4 l/S" x .1 S/S" heat treated to SO Be 

Ctmtom machined knurled grip 





- 

And The Beat Goes On, 



BGtil TB aircraft aluminum 
Type /// hard anodtte 



(619)530-8766 



7734 Arjons Drive. San Diego, CA 921 2& Fax (619) 530-0734 
WEB SITE, http://www.gtkrtlvmi.com 



BLADE / 1 09 



A COMPLETE LINE OF KNIFEMAKING SUPPLIES 
FROM A FULL-TIME SHOP 



• NEW CATALOG 

• NEW BLADES & PRODUCTS 

• IN HOUSE HEAT TREATING 

• IN-HOUSE CRYOGENIC QUENCH 

• NEW SS DAMASCUS BLADES 




TEXAS 
KNtEEMAKERS 
SUPPLY 



METALS 

FINISHED BLADES 

EXOTIC WOODS 

HORNS 

M1CARTAS 

BELT SANDERS 

HEAT TREATING OVENS 

SHEATHS 




Send $3.00 for Catalog 

TEXAS KNIFEMAKERS SUPPLY 

10649 Haddington #180 

Houston, Texas 77043 

(713) 461-8632 Fax (713) 461-8221 
http://www.siteblazer.net/texasknife 



THE GREATEST KNIFE SHOW ON EARTH XV 

Buy - Sell - Trade 

Address: The Grand Hotel and Convention Center 

Highway 44 1 , 3 1 7 1 Pa rkway 

Pigeon Forge, Tennessee 

(30 miles from Knuxville, 5 miles from Gatlinburg) 
Hotel Reservations: 1-800-251-4444 

(Mention the Knife Show for special room rates.) 
Table Reservations: 1-800-247-0599 $55.00 - 8' Table 
Admission: $3.00 per day, $5.00 weekend pass 

Dates: June 5-7, 1998 

Friday, June 5, 1998 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM 

Saturday, June 6, 1998 9:00 AM - 6:00 PM 

Sunday. June 7, 1998 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM 

This show will feature over 350 mink's packed full of antique, custom, new. collectible, 
investment quality, and working knives. This show has u all!!! Need a knife lor working 
or bunting, you'll have no problem finding it here. Prices in all ranges. We have dealers 
from all over the United States bring some of the most rare displays of knives and 
memorabilia. Most people could never get lo see some of the specimens brought to 
our show just for public viewing. Pigeon Forge is a great all around family fun center. 
Not only are there plenty of antique shops, discounf malls, shows, and dinner theaters, 
but there are arcades, water partis, miniature golf, etc. Don't miss this opportunity to 
spend a great getaway in one of America's most beautiful places. The Great Smoky 
Mo u mains. 

Sponsor: Parkers' Knife Collector Service 

PO Box 23522, Chattanooga, TN 37422 




Boker Super Liner, the BLADE Maga- 
zine I «7 Overall Knife Of The Year® 
($175 SRI'). 

BROWNING Smaller versions of its 
Barracuda models and two-blade 
versions of its Kodiak F.D.T. 

BUCK The Odyssey line, a series of 
linerlocks with holes in their ATS-34 
blades, textured thermoplastic or 
Miearta grips, straight or partially 
serrated edges, and removable clips, 
with SRPs ranging from $50 lo $91; the 
Intrepid, four different sizes til tactical 
fixed blades designed by Kit Carson, 
including Kit's unusual serration design, 
with input from Navy EOD man Robert 
Cude: and a series of checkered, green - 
handle models with BG-42 blade steel. 

CASE The Mini CoppcrLock, a 
pattern that's basically a mini trapper 
with elements of the copperhead, and 
which comes in yellow synthetic, stag. 
Pocket Worn green bone and chestnut 
bone handles ($34.9S-$57.95 SRPs); and 
the addition of greenbone handles to 

"The Micro-Tech 
Razorback is Massad 
Ayoob's first fixed- 
blade design." 

the Pocket Worn line, as well as five 
more Pocket Worn patterns: large 
stockman, mini CopperLock, small 
Texas toothpick, slimline trapper and 
trapper nut ($29. 95-$59.95 SRPs). 

COLUMBIA RIVER KNIFE it 
TOOL The K.LS.S. integral one-hand 
knife designed by Ed Halligan ($39.95 
SRP); the Apache II ($74.95 SRP). a 
smaller version of the Apache tactical 



110 / BLADE 



JUNE 93 




The Gerber Multi-Lite Tool has a detach- 
able flashlight that doubles as a compart- 
ment holding a tweezers, toothpick and 
eyeglasses screwdriver. 



folder; and ihe Seahawk, 3 tactical folder 

with a serrated, havvkbill blade of ATS- 
34 and a 6061 T6 hard anodized black 
aluminum handle ($89.95 SRP). 

GATCO/TIMBERLINE The Aviator 
pilot survival knife, a Vaughn Neeley 
design with a fixed, chisel-ground blade 
in titanium-coated or bead-blasted 
finishes, a synthetic handle and a Kydex 
sheath designed by Tim Wugner with 
input from special ops jump teams. The 
sheath conies with a hex wrench for 
attaching webbing, a mi I -spec, quick- 
breakaway belt loop and other special 
features ($170 SRP). 

GERBER The Multi-Lite Tool, a tool 
knife with a detachable flashlight. The 
flashlighl body has ;i compartment hold- 
ing a twee/crs. toothpick and eyeglasses 
screwdriver. Each tool locks via a slid- 
ing, spring-loaded mechanism. Closed 
length: 3 1/4 inches. 

GUTMANN The Kashmir cigar knife, 
a combo folding knife/cigar cutler with 
an AUS-6 guillotine blade and cloth- 
ing/money clip. Closed length; 2 7/8 
inches. We'ighi: In ounces ($42.95 SRP); 
the Marshall Jr. and Marshall one-hand- 
ers in Zvlel handles with blue inserts and 
AUS-lf) blades (respective SRPs of 
$42.95 and $49.95); and the Baby Hatlori 
($199.95 SRP), a small version of the 
Hattori fighter. 

KA-BAR The Next Generation Tanto 
and Fighter (both $132.22 SRP). each 
with partially serrated, 7-inch blades of 
12C27 stainless; lOOih Anniversary 
USMC knife with presentation display 
case ($99.95 SRP); and 100th Anniver- 

JUNE 98 




Purpose Driven 

The Apache and all CRKT knives offer purpose-driven design and 
premium-grade materials with the truly advanced technology 
that guarantees high performance. 



m 




ATS-34 Stainless Steel Blade. 

Fine Bead-Blast Finish. 

T420 Stainless Steel Locking Liner, 

(One-hand opening and closing.) 

Teflon® Bearings. 

6061 T6 Hard Anodized Aluminum Handle. 

Pocket/Belt Clip 

Pick up the Apache. Swing open the blade with your thumb. 
Check out the blade. Test the edge. Inspect its overall quality 
and finish, feel its weight and balance and how it fits your hand. 
The purpose-driven Apache is all business. 

Simply Incredible 

£^q COLUMBIA 



Model 7013 

Removable Pocket/Belt Clip on reverse side. 
Reversible thumb-stud for left-hand use. 
Three models available, featuring 
Raior-Sharp. Triple- Point m 
Serrated, and Combination 
Blades. Overall Blade 
length: 4.06" 



$89.95 

MSRP 



RIVER & TO O L 



Please calf or write: Tel (503) 685-SOfS ■ (800) 891-3100 • FAX (S03) 682-9680 
9720 S.W. Hillman Court, Suite 805 • Wilsonville, OR 97070 USA 



Introducing a new 
line of exceptional 
folding knives. 



Model T12 - $229.00 
3" ATS-34 Blade, RC60 
Anodized Titanium Liner- Lock® 
Amber Jig Bone Handles 
Includes Sheath 



Catalog available - Dealer inquiries welcome 



^William Henry 

FINE KNIVES 



30 Janis Way, Suite A • Scorn Valley, CA 95066 
Phone (408) 461-061 1 • Fax (408) 461-0971 






BLADE / 111 



iiexTjssHJ 

Blade 

WORLD'S # 1 KNIFE MAGAZINE 




New For '96 



• The Knives My 
Father And His 
Father Carried 

•The Best Folder 
Mechanisms 

• America's 

Most Oppressive 

Knife Laws 

• If You Could 

Have Only 3 Using 

Blades, What 

Would They Be? 



•Why 
Wood Grips Are 
So Good 

• How To Make An 
Inlaid Sheath 

• And 

A Whole 

Buncft More! 



■ \ 



€%U 



L© 



1 




VV 



United offers a series of race-car knives and Columbia River Knife & Tool unveils its 
reproduction of the Ed Halligan K.I.S.S, knife design. 



sary Folding Grizzly Knife in presenta- 
tion case ($89.95). 

KATZ The CF800DP tockbaek with 
carbon fiber handle ($1 ]<>.'>5 SRP). 

KELLAM The Juniors, more afford- 
able versions of I lie company's fixed- 
blade Tommi utility line, with 
Progression tempered© carbon steel 
blades and curly birch handles ($100- 
$137 SRP), 

LEATHERMAN The SideClip. a tool 
knife with a clothing clip, and the Wave, 
a tool knife that includes among its other 
tools four that each operate on its own 
separate lincrlock mechanism (due out 
in Julv or August). 

AL MAR "KNIVES A tactical fixed 
blade design by Chris Reeve ($310 SRP) 
and a mini-multi-tool in gold or black 
finishes by Sober tech. 

MICRO-TECH The Massad Ayoob 
Razorback ($154 SRP). Avoob's second 



knife design and bis first fixed blade, a 
chisel-point ticketed for "legal carry in a 
majority of jurisdictions." 

MEYERCO A smaller version of the 
Strut'N'Cut and a new positive- lock 
design by Blackie Collins with a carbon 
graphite handle. 

QUEEN The Executive Series, a line 
of pockelknives with heavily embell- 
ished, patterned-brass handles. 

ROUND EYE KNIFE & TOOL The 
Pioneer series, manual one-handers 
featuring the Rolling Lock, an opening 
mechanism activated by a small lever at 
the blade/handle juncture. Blades come 
in a variety of shapes, two steels (ATS- 
34 and BG-42) and two finishes (Black T 
and Satin Silver). The handle is G-10. 
SRPis$12M. l J5. 

SANTA FE STONEWORKS A 
pearl-handle version of the Spyderco 
Viele with pearl slabs on both sides of 



112 /BLADE 



JUNE 98 



the handle ($580 SRP). 

SCHRADE The Jim Zumbo Special 
Edition I Elk. a heavy duty field knife 
with a 5 3/4-inch, stainless steel, gut hook 
blade and synthetic handle ($89.95 SRP}; 
the Theodore Roosevelt knife, the first 
in the American Legends series, with a 
stag handle. 24k-gold blade etch and a 
hardwood plaque bearing Roosevelfs 
image; and the CH4FH. a smaller version 
of the Cliphanuur <$2<J.<>5 SRP). 

SEBERTECH The Sebertech M4, a 
new version of the company's small 
multi-tool with a knife blade (due out in 
August). 

SMITH & WESSON The S.W.A.T. 

"The Genesis I blade 

operates on a bronze 

bushing with Teflon 

washers." 

tactical folder in a G-10 handle ($69.95 
SRP). 
SOG SPECIALTY KNIVES The 

Jetstream, a knife with a mechanism 
called the Frazer Lock due out this 
summer that will enable the user to 
disengage the linerloek mechanism easily 
from EITHER side of the handle 
($64.95-$74.95 SRP). 

SPYDERCO The Mini Dyad C39 
($85.95 SRP). a knife with 'a blade 
coming out of each handle end, one 
straight edged, the other serrated. 

SWISS ARMY BRANDS The Swiss- 
Tool, a tool knife with 23 features ($87 
SRP). 

SWISSTECH The Utili-Key. a multi- 
tool in the shape of a key that fits on a 
keychain and which sports a knife blade 
(due out in August). 

UNITED CUTLERY BRANDS The 
Action Racing 1:64 Scale Collectible Car 
Knife Series with models featuring the 
reproduced autographs of Jeff Gordon. 
Dale Earnhardt. Rusty Wallace. Dale 
J arret! and funny car man John Force: 
the David Ye I low horse Night Chant {3rd 
Edition) and Silver Series; the Colt Path- 
finder tactical fixed blade and camp 
knives: and the Colt Python tactical fold- 
ers in aluminum handles and 420 stain- 
less sleet blades. 

UTICA A smaller, updated version of 
the Minimaster ($30.4(1 SRP) keychain 
tool knife, with 16 features, each of 
which lock in place. Closed length; 2 3/S 
inches. Weight: I 3/4 ounces. 

WENGER The Microtech nician ($150 
SRP). a Swiss Army knife with tools 
designed to work on computers, and the 
Cigar Cutter ($65 SRP). an SAK with a 
cigar cutter (the latter due out this 
summer). 

For the tuldresses of the knives in this story, 
see "Wltere To Get 'Em" on pane 95. BCTdJ 

JUNE 96 




IT'S ONE 



A KNIFE 



-KEEP IT SUPER SIMPLE" said Ed Halligan, Knifcmakcrs' Guild Member, and designer/ 
engineer of CRKT's new K.I.S.S. Knife. And it is! The two major components - Blade and 
Frame - arc precision fine blanked of high carbon stainless steel and bead blast finished. 
Whether clipped in your pocket, used as a money clip or key chain knife, this one hand 
opening and closing Frame Lock™ folder is a honey. Available with 2%" Razor-Sharp or 
Combination cutting edge - MSRP $39.95. Limited lifetime warranty. 



^ COLUMBIA 

Wt RIVER 



K 
& 



N I F E 
TOOL 



9720 S.W. Hillman Court, Suite 805 

Wilsonville, OR 97070 USA 

Tel (503) 685-5015 • 800/891-3100 

FAX 503/682-9680 



iRiraiM 



1104 53 rd COURT SOUTH, AUSTRALIAN BUSINESS PARK, MANGONIA PARK, FL 3340. 

Phone: (561) 863-3205 ■ Fax:(561) 863-3277 • For Quick Service Toll Free:(800) 500-3879 

e-mail : mail@joyenterprises.com • Catalog available to dealers only. 

Please include letterhead, phone number & resale license number. 



Qoldem Jim Tachi Sword 



%&(£) 



SPORTING 
CUTLERY 

to 



a^aU 



15300 - 41" - TAiwAn 

440 Stainless - Ra20r Sharp - The Real Thing 







Kamq - 5i Sword 










15810 - 33'A" - TAiWArt 
t Beheading Sword 
4 Etched Blade 

Super Heavy 

Stand Included 



'^^Jj^qJI' ,\¥xiM~,*. 



mmmm 



V 




BLADE/ 113 




BLADES & BEYOND 



By David Kowatski 



Custom Knife Judging Moves To Friday At BLADE Show 



When attendees enter the 
BLADE Show & Interna- 
tional Cutlery Fair on Friday 
evening this year, they'll see the distinc- 
tive BLADE custom knife awards 
displayed on winners' tables. Thai's 
because we're moving the judging to the 
first day of the custom knife show. 
Friday. June 12. 

Then on Friday evening, we'll 



announce the winners and hand out the 
awards. As attendees walk the show late 
Friday, and then on Saturday morning, 
they'll be able to quickly pinpoint those 
distinctive awards and the proud makers. 
The BLADE Show has a long history 
of custom knife judging. We have always 
believed that knife judging adds another 
level of interest to any knife show and 
helps pinpoint makers of high-quality. 



innovative products. 

Especially for our numerous first-time 
show attendees, such award programs 
are an additional source of knife educa- 
tion. If qualified judges rale a knife- 
highly, we would certainty invite show 
attendees to examine the piece closely to 
appreciate the fit, finish and design 
features that impressed the judging 
panel. 



BLADEhandmade Award Program Alive And Weil For I 99B 



As magazine publishers, we get 
frequent calls from knife collectors 
and investors asking us to recom- 
mend quality makers. It's a conflict of 
interest for us to do so. We would 
certainly want all of our advertisers to 
have an opportunity to impress readers 
with their craftsmanship and artistry. 

Thai's one of the reasons we developed 
the BLADEhandmade™ Awards. We 



wanted to recognize quality knives 
winning awards in shows across the coun- 
try. So we invile all show promoters to 
send for rules so they can enter the 
winners of their knife competitions in the 
program. 

If a show has a minimum number of 
entries and uses three qualified judges, it 
can submit its results to us. We then do a 
tabulation at the end of the year to deter- 



mine the BLADEhandmade Awards in 
ten categories. 

Winners at the BLADE Show custom 
knife competition are automatically 
entered in the BLADEhandmade 
program. So are winners at BLADE 
Show West in California in September 
and several other shows held throughout 
the year. The overall winners are then 
announced at the BLADE Show West. 



Got Ready For FREE 
Suoer Sominars At 
The BLADE Show 



Another great tradition at the 
BLADE Show is the opportunity 
to attend a variety of free educa- 
tional seminars conducted by real experts 
in their respective fields. And 1998 will be 
no exception. 

We'll give you the chance to hear about 
52100 steel, knives of the Special Forces, 
Vietnam knives, Randall knives and the 
knives of Scagel. Bill Moran and Jay 
Hcndrickson will conduct another of their 
famous forging demonstrations. You'll 
learn how to throw knives, sharpen knives 
and watch culling demos. 

Now thai the American Knife & Tool 
Institute is a reality, you'll learn how you 
can get involved in the important fight to 
keep knives in American life. In our 
August issue, we'll give you all the dates 
and limes for these exciting seminars. 

Knife displays have also been a big pari 
of the BLADE Show. And we'll give you 
more knife displays in 1998 than we've 
ever had at the show. They'll be right on 
the show floor ... our bigger-than-ever 
show floor. 

Plan lo attend! You'll be glad you did. 

114 /BLADE 




JUNE 96 



Classic 
Pocket Worrf 



': 



There's a certain feel to a pocketknife that has spent years in a front pocket 
Slightly smoother. Corners ever-so- rounded, rivets worn a tad flatter. It's a comfortable 
feel — and one which we've duplicated right here. By spending a little more time hand- 
finishing this knife, we've made it T- 1 -J-J^f. T5 \ U f a wa v 
feel like it's been in your pocket forever. ^eiS riglU* IVlgHt dWdy. 

That's a Case Pocket Worn® knife. 

Choose from 16 knives hi old red or classic green bone. 



-HAND-CRAFTED KNIVES SINCE 1889- 

For information aboul Case knives visil our web site at http://www.wrcase.com For a copy of the latest Case catalog send S5.00 to W R Case and Soi 
Owens Way. Bradford. PA 16701 • For Ihe location of Ihe nearesl aulhorized Case knife dealer, call 1-800-523-6350 



( tht "Citizen" 



First in a new line of knives from C.A.S., 
the "Citizen" is a super-quality, high-tech 
triple- locking folder with a dual position 
blade and a patented push-button locking 
system. 



44QC stainless Blade is heat treated 
to'Kf 58-61 

lull-open position 
•Blade locked 



/^fe\ 




'Push 'tuition lock ing 
mechanism is seated for 
consistently smooth 
operation 



Investment-cast stainless steel frame 
has "open Back" styling for easy cleaning 
and ergonomic design J or comfort and control 
in normal grip, counter-grip and push-dagger 
positions 




'Push-dagger position 
-Blade locked 



' Oversize self-guard 
for tmvcimum safety 



/ ^\ 





Closed 
position 
-Blade locked 



' 'picket 'Damascus 
inlays are always 
different, making 
each knife a 
personal and 
unique worfafart 

'Xand'-Braided leather lanyard 
for fast accessibility 



Shown full size, the "Citizen" measures 4-5/8" 
closed and is supplied with a lateral-carry belt 
sheath for comfort and security. 



C.A.S. IBERIA 

650 Industrial Blvd. 
Sale Creek, TN 37373 
(423) 332-4700 
www.casiberia.com